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For November (Fall) 1969
LASELL LEAVES
Vol. XCV, No. 1

see previous bound volume
of the Leaves



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Fund Issue
Winter 1970



Lasell Alumnae, Inc.



Officers 1969-70

President

Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 (Mrs. Bruce B.)

3 Knollwood Drive, Dover 02030

First Vice-President

Sandy Shelton Fitch '56 (Mrs. Norman P.)
9 Fox Lane, Medfield 02052

Second Vice-President

Penny Rafkin Hurwitz '56 (Mrs. Budd H.)

4 Rolling Drive, Framingham 01701

Recording Secretary

Betty Williams McGowan '47 (Mrs. F. M., Jr.)
52 Brewster Avenue, Braintree Highlands 02185

Corresponding Secretary

Linda Nolin Ahern '55 (Mrs. Robert)
106 Hemlock Street, Arlington 02174

Treasurer

Ruth Turner Crosby '42 (Mrs. R. A.)
170 Harvard Street, Newtonville 02160



Assistant Treasurer

Ruth Buswell Isaacson '36 (Mrs. C. G.
10 Laurel Avenue, Waltham 02154



G.)



Alumnae Fund Committee

Alice Pratt Brown '29 (Mrs. William W.)
Crest Road, Middlebury, Conn. 06762

Mildred Bell Cole '31 (Mrs. Oliver S.)
95 Fox Hill Street, Westwood 02090

Louise Tardivel Higgins '37 (Mrs. C. A., Jr.)
150 Hickory Road, Weston 02193

Scholarship Committee Chairman

Virginia Wolfe Perkins '44 (Mrs. E. F., Jr.)
76 Orchard Lane, Melrose 02176



Directors

Mildred Strain Nutter '17 (Mrs. Denton G.)
1094 Centre Street, Newton Centre 02159

Toni Meritt Smith '23 (Mrs. W. N.)

110 Woodland Road, Auburndale 02166

Dorothy Inett Taylor '30 (Mrs. L. D.)
41 Brentwood Drive, Holden 01520

Shirley Gould Chesebro '33 (Mrs. R. Alan)
110 Carver Road, Newton Highlands 02161

Camie Porter Morison '40 (Mrs. Wm. K.)
8 Park Ridge, Concord, N.H. 03301

Marilyn Blodgett Hall '46 (Mrs. E. Sherman, Jr.)
60 Ledgelawn Avenue, Lexington 02173

Kay Woolaver Parsons '46 (Mrs. George E.)
32 Marcia Road, Watertown 02171

Mary Small Lee '48 (Mrs. Walter C.)
192 Pine Ridge Road, Waban 02168

Judy Parker Haas '49 (Mrs. R. H.)

3 Sherwood Road, Nashua, N.H. 03060

Betty Lou Foy Reid '52 (Mrs. William I., Jr.)
6 Gardiner Avenue, Lincoln, R.I. 02865

Marilyn Senior Legg '60 (Mrs. Richard M.)
32 Edgewood Road, Scituate 02066

Nan Sparks Hunter '61 (Mrs. Carl E.)
69 Main St., Framingham Centre 01701

Linda Foster Nixon '65 (Mrs. David S.)
32 St. Paul Street, Brookline 02146



Alumnae Secretary

Marjorie MacClymon '32

Lasell Junior College, Auburndale 02166

Lasell Leaves

Editor

Patricia Searles

Alumnae Editor

Marjorie MacClymon '32



The Lasell Leaves is published quarterly by Lasell Alumnae, Inc., Lasell Junior College, Auburndale, Mass. 02166,
a member of the American Alumni Council since 1947. Single copies of Lasell Leaves may be obtained for $1.25
from the Alumnae Office. Application for second-class postage permit pending at Boston, Massachusetts.



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photo credits:
Robert Case; 2, 3
Robert Chalue: 4, 5, 10
Carolyn A. Wilson; 8



Vol. XCV No. 2
March 1970



Contents



A Visit with Mrs. Greene 2

Counseling Service Introduced 4

The Lasell Medallion 1969 6

Junior College or Early College? 9

What Has Happened to the

Class of 1969? 12

Engagements 16

Marriages 17

Class Notes 20

In Memoriam 32

Clubs 33



A Visit with Mrs. Greene



When it was announced in January that Dr.
Kenneth M. Greene would become Lasell's
tenth chief executive in July, various
campus news media hurried to interview Dr.
Greene. Meanwhile, The Leaves dropped in
at the Greene's present home just off campus
to talk informally with Mrs. Greene about her
current interests and plans for the next year.

During the remainder of this semester the
Greenes will continue a rather hectic schedule
of time divided between Boston and
Auburndale since, as circumstance would
have it, most of the Greene family, moving here
eight years ago to get away from the city,
now commute back into town every day. While
Dr. Greene combines the completion of his
term as Chairman of the Department of
Education at Simmons College this spring, with
becoming better acquainted with Lasell,
Mrs. Greene simultaneously will complete her
semester of teaching in Brookline. Presently
teaching kindergarten in the morning at
the Edward Devotion School, and giving special
tutoring in English to small groups of non- or
semi- English speaking children in the
afternoon, she will stop teaching when they
officially come to Lasell in July. Of the Greene
children, Kenneth Jr., 12, does his share of
commuting presently to Roxbury Latin
where he started school this year. The two
girls, Jocelyn, 16, and Janet, 13, attend





Mrs. Greene and Janet



Janet

Newton High and Warren Junior High
respectively.

Like Dr. Greene, who originally came from
Cleveland to the New England area to attend
college at Brown University, Mrs. Greene
came "east" to Boston to attend Simmons
College, but from closer-by, western Massachu-
setts. After receiving her Bachelor degree
at Simmons, she then went on to obtain an
M.Ed from State College in Fitchburg.
Except for the years when their children
were pre-schoolers and family pre-empted
professional interests, she has been teaching
and working with all ages of nursery-to-
eighth-grade children ever since. When they
first moved to Auburndale, in fact, she taught
nursery school locally and later directed a
children's church choir in Auburndale. Now she
prefers to work with children from nursery
school level through the third grade, while they
are still spontaneous, and before they
become hardened by the routines of subject
studying in later grades. With her city
kindergarteners she enjoys trying new things
to meet their special needs. This year, for
example, as an extracurricular project she
thought of offering these predominantly
apartment-living children the otherwise unlikely
experience of owning a pet. Now, as a result,
one well-traveled class guinea pig leaves
each Friday with a different child and his
provisions packed for the weekend, and returns
to school on Monday morning. This temporary
ownership plan for younger children who want
the fun of a pet but not necessarily the







tit

^ . 1



Dr. and Mrs. Greene



extended responsibility for taking care of it,
has been a great success with children and
parents alike, she adds. It seems to get
this need worked out of the child's system, and
the family is of course glad this is so.

Mrs. Greene's afternoon program is one she
says offers a very different kind of teaching
satisfaction. Of the approximately 50 children
who are in the program because their level
of proficiency in English has caused them to fall
behind in school, some are from Chinese,
Korean, Israeli, Indian, and some from Spanish
families. She and another teacher share the
tutoring load for these students who, by age,
actually represent various school levels
from second to eighth grades. In the tutoring
program they are divided by ability, rather
than by age or native language, into small
conversational groups. There they work
with a few simple visual aids, and listen and
respond in English, until they have the
conversational ability to participate in and




return to their appropriate grade level course
work. Tutoring in this type of program,
Mrs. Greene says, is just as rewarding as it is
challenging for the teacher.

While Mrs. Greene is tremendously enthusiastic
about her present teaching efforts, she
says she is looking forward very much to
participating in the life of the college next fall
in her full-time role as wife of the President.
She hopes too to have some time to continue
with some of the many hobbies and
interests she developed when their children
were not yet school age. In their present
Grove Street home there is ample evidence of
her interest in interior decoration and oil




Kenneth, Jr. and Dr. Greene



Mrs. Greene and Jocelyn

painting, and now she is making plans for
the changes involved in adapting the
President's House to their particular needs,
when the move comes later this year. Among
the artistic and musical interests she hopes
to find time to continue are: experimenting
with simple design in both knitting and sewing,
playing the piano, the autoharp, singing in the
church choir, and the latest: learning to
play the guitar. Her musical interest, which she
traces to her own family, is shared by the
Greene's children whose collective talents
include playing the trumpet, piano, and
clarinet, and by Dr. Greene who plays the oboe
and recorder. Other common interests of
the family have led to their attending concerts
in Tanglewood together and taking family
vacations during August, as they have for
the last few years, on Cape Cod, where
they fish and sail, often visiting Dr. Greene's
mother in Harwichport. The latest common
interests of the family are bridge and chess, and
undoubtedly there will be many more. ��



Counseling Service Introduced




ounseling Service building
on Maple Terrace



New to the Lasell community this year is a
Counseling Service, located directly across
from the Health Center at the end of Maple
Terrace, which operates as a wholly
independent arm of the Center. The new service
is an offshoot of ideas long under
consideration by faculty and administration
and formalized last year by Health Center
Director, Dr. R. Emerson Sylvester. Its
principal purpose, as outlined by Dr. Sylvester,
is to provide confidential help for students
with their interpersonal and emotional needs.
As a part of the college health program no
fee is charged.

Formerly the residence of Mrs. Dorothy Harris,
assistant to the deans, the building housing
the service is a unit physically set apart
from the Health Center containing a reception
area and waiting room, individual counseling
offices, a group therapy room, a staff
conference and educational seminar room, and
a small area to be set aside as a library-
reading room.




Full-time director of the new service is
psychologist Mr. Donald Manthei who was
formerly teaching and counseling at Boston
University, and came to Lasell this fall
from nearby Mt. Ida Junior College, where he
was also an instructor and counselor. Assisting
Mr. Manthei two days a week is Mrs. Ronnie
Michaelson, a summa cum laude graduate
of Queens College in New York City, who is
presently enrolled in a Master's program for her
M.Ed, in Counselor Education at Boston
University. Other graduate trainees in
counseling may be added to the staff as the
service develops. Mrs. May Parker of Framing-
ham, a former resident of Newton, is the
receptionist-secretary for the Counseling
Service.

Although individual counseling, as the
Counseling Service suggests, is an important
part of the work of the entire program,
its overall scope is far more extensive. Besides
diagnostic evaluation and psychiatric referral,
which are coupled with individual counseling
when appropriate, group therapy sessions
and non-credit educational seminars have also
already been successful. Mrs. Michaelson
has provided leadership for a seminar during
the first semester with topics ranging from
preparation for marriage to more general issues
such as the role of women in society today.

In carrying out the individual counseling side
of the program, Mr. Manthei says the facility
actually acts as a mental health adjunct to
the Lasell Health Center. Its principal concern
is to provide the same easy access to help
in mental and emotional problems that the




Health Center provides for physical problems.
"Setting up the facility with this end in mind
was in part a response to a new cultural
acceptance of psychological help that has
removed much of the stigma formerly attached
to having mental illnesses as well as
emotional problems. This is a significant step
forward and continues the concept of concern
for the "whole person" by Lasell Junior
College." A student may benefit from an evalua-
tive or mental health interview, just as she
would from a physical exam. She may obtain
some "feedback" on who she is and where she
is, which can help her in the process of
normal growth.

The list of reasons that have led students to
come for consultation covers the full range
of what one might expect from a cross-section
of any group of comparable size. Mr.
Manthei asserts that most of the girls he sees
are normal and growing; that they simply
need an assist in this process. Some are in a
crisis where they find their normal growth being
interrupted and need some assistance in
overcoming the obstacle before continuing the
natural growth process. There are two other
normal types of girls which he calls
"conformists" and those "acting out".
The "conforming" individual displays an apathy
which is really a fear of change, or is closely
conforming to peer group standards;
individuals who are "acting out" are rebelling
against either undue or incorrectly perceived
authority. This latter type of normal acting
out, he says, is a legitimate form of experiment-
ing comparable to the experimentation in
previous generations. It is to be distinguished



from a delinquent acting out which is
destructive to oneself and to others.

As a full-time counselor on campus, Mr.
Manthei feels that the service has the
opportunity to provide the college with a unique
program; one which should be tailored to
give maximum help to the student by meeting
specific needs as they arise, and that the
key to developing this program is flexibility.
One of the special features he has incorporated
into the Lasell service, therefore, is a
"walk-in" time. Regularly scheduled Monday
and Friday each week from 1 :00-2:30 P.M.,
it is a free time during which any student may
just drop in, or any faculty or staff member
who feels that a student needs encouragement
to come, may suggest that they drop in
together if the student wishes. Both the
counselor and the student can usually deter-
mine their ability to work with each other in
an initial interview within fifteen or twenty
minutes. Therefore a student usually
waits about five minutes or so for her interview
if there is already someone talking with the
counselor. Occasionally as many as five girls
have come through the office within the
hour-and-a-half period. Regular appointments
are scheduled through the Counseling
Service secretary.

In addition to flexibility the program offers
availability through a "phone-in" time which
increases access for staff, faculty and
student personnel services. Outside office
hours phone contact may be made by calling
the Health Center.

As this first year of the service progresses, the
staff plans to continue to offer leadership
for student discussions on some of the normal
problems and issues that are of concern to
all young adults, such as sex, dating,
parents, planning both a marriage and career,
and other social relations problems.
Educational seminar groups will also consider
the students' particular areas of interest as
they come to light.

The response to all aspects of the program has
in fact already been very encouraging, after
only one semester on campus. Mr. Manthei
noted that within a week of their setting up their
offices in October, the schedule was full.
Although some students are referred by faculty
or staff, well over fifty per cent are self-
initiated contacts. ��



Mr. Donald Manthei
Mrs. Ronnie Michaelson



The Lasell Medallion 1969



On June 15, 1968, Lasell's fourth President,
Dr. Vincent C. DeBaun, announced the
establishment of a new award: the Lasell
Medallion, honoring special outstanding
members of the College community, to be
presented annually at Reunion in June.

As stipulated at that time, the bronze medallion
award "may be made to any member of the
Lasell Junior College family who, by virtue of
distinguished service to the College or to
society at large, has brought added honor to the
name of Lasell." Any alumna, faculty member,
administrator, trustee, staff member, or
other person connected with the college was
thus made eligible to receive this honor.

The Lasell Medallions are the gift of Mr.
Chester H. Lasell of New York City, who is the
grandson of Josiah Lasell, co-principal
(1852-1861) of Lasell Seminary, and brother of
founder Edward Lasell. Each year a committee
appointed by the Alumnae Board of Manage-
ment selects individuals to receive the award.

The five first recipients of the Lasell
Medallion were honored at the 1968 ceremony.
They were: Constance E. Blackstock '09,
Margaret Trice Gibbens '16, Helen L. Beede
'21, Alice Hillard Smith Corbin, and Maude
Simes Harding '06.

On June 14, 1969, there were six recipients
honored at the second annual ceremony. They
included three Lasell alumnae and three
distinguished members of the College
community. As they received their medallions,
the following citations were made:



Josephine Woodward Rand '10 (In Absentia)

"It does seem fitting — on this — the Golden
Reunion celebration of the Class of 1919 — that
we applaud the President of the Class of
1910 in words of the President of 1919 — the late
Priscilla Alden Wolfe.

I quote: 'Back in the dear old days, which are
definitely not beyond the ability of a great
many of us to recall, Lasell used to specialize
in training leaders. This was done, to a
certain extent, through the medium of military



drill and extremely strict rules for dress and
decorum, plus, of course, diligent attention
to one's lessons. This type of schooling
(or finishing, as they chose to call it) produced
young women who were able to take the lead
in all good things such as making a home,
rearing a happy family, attending to civic
duties, and keeping an unfailing interest in the
College and its welfare.' Josephine Woodward
Rand is an outstanding example of Lasell
girls of this era.

The oldest sister in the family of three girls, all
of whom graduated from Lasell, she spent
her first years after leaving school in being a
busy wife and mother. When her three
sons were old enough to allow her to take an
active interest in other affairs, she became
President of the Lasell Alumnae Association
and served for five years. It was during
her term of office that the Association was
incorporated.

Her involvements have been many; her interest
in gardens and show dogs became a hobby
for the entire family. Mrs. Rand's responsi-
bilities have included: President of the Garden
Club Federation of Massachusetts, Com-
missioner of the Brookline Girl Scouts,
Chairman of the Brookline Chapters of the
American Cancer Society, American Red Cross,
and Women's Republican Committee. She is
a member of the New England Historical
and Genealogical Society and of the Women's
Advisory Council of the University of
Massachusetts.




Janet Lee Sheffer '69



All of these offices require graciousness, tact,
tolerance, executive ability and a zest for
life that Josephine Woodward Rand has
in abundance. Lasell Junior College — and
importantly, Lasell Alumnae Incorporated — are
justly proud of her and grateful for this
opportunity to recognize Josephine Woodward
Rand.

Mildred Strain Nutter '17

Mrs. Nutter's association with Lasell began
in mid-Atlantic in the summer of 1911 when she
was returning from a European vacation. It
was then she met — for the first time — the
late Lillie Rose Potter, who was chaperoning a
group of students. Mildred came to Lasell in
September 1914, from the Mary A. Burnham
School in Northampton. After her marriage to
Dr. Denton G. Nutter, she settled in Newton
Centre where she became active in all
community affairs, and is now a Trustee of the
United Methodist Church.

Lasell has been of prime and continuing
interest to Mrs. Nutter. President of Lasell
Alumnae in 1940-42, she has served as a
member of the Lasell Corporation since 1937.
A Life Member of the Alumnae Association,
Mrs. Nutter is a Director of the Board of
Management; has served a number of years as
a Director of the Greater Boston Club. She
has been Agent for the Class of 1917;
annually hostesses a mid-summer picnic for
vacationing and visiting alumnae on Cape Cod.

Her more personal association has been as
wife of a Trustee, the late Dr. Nutter; as
mother of current Alumnae President, Marion
Nutter Bredehoft '55, and mother-in-law of
current Trustee, Bruce Bredehoft.

In the presence of her immediate family —
Marion and Denton G., Jr. — we are pleased
to award a Medallion to this devoted and
loyal alumna.

Janet Lee Sheffer '69

Just six days ago — on June 8th — Janet Lee
Sheffer was awarded an Associate in Arts
Degree from Lasell Junior College. Daughter
of Mr. & Mrs. John Sheffer of Oreland,
Pennsylvania, Janet followed closely the



Lasell pattern of her mother, the former Janet
Jansing of the Class of 1941.

For the 1988-69 academic year, Janet has
served as President of the College Government,
and has done an outstanding job in meeting
the demands of both the student body and of
the faculty. Janet was an effective guest
speaker at the 1969 Annual Alumnae Council
Meetings.

When she was awarded a Lasell Jacket at
this year's Class Day Exercises, Janet was
given a standing ovation by her classmates.

With every good wish for the future, Lasell
Alumnae Incorporated today presents a
Medallion to Janet for outstanding leadership
during her student days.



Muriel R. McClelland

As she herself often announces, 'Miss Mac'
holds the title of 'oldest living on campus' —
but that is in service only! Miss McClelland
joined the Lasell faculty — as a member of the
Physical Education Department in September,
1929; in 1945 she was appointed Assistant
to the Dean.

In 1940, she became Lasell's crew director —
and has successfully managed to sustain
enthusiasm for this — our unique tradition.

Mac's roots are solidly implanted in Newton —
she was born in the Newton-Wellesley hospital.
While attending grammar school, she placed
No. 1 in a tennis tournament; then and there
decided to become a Physical Education
teacher. At Oberlin College she was the
all-college tennis champion, at Boston Bouve
(now a part of Northeastern University) she
was named Best Athlete. The highlight of her
athletic career was being chosen a member of
the All-American Field Hockey Team.

Miss Mac is a faithful supporter of all Lasell
activities — four classes have chosen her
Class Advisor; three yearbooks have been
dedicated to her.

It is a distinct privilege for Lasell Alumnae
Incorporated to award a Medallion to this most
loyal non-alumna Alumna.




Muriel R. McClelland




t, Mildred Strain Nutter '17
wing Medallion to Mrs.
ton Levenson '22; and right,
and Mrs. Sylvester with
rgaret Ricker Tewksbury



Margaret Ricker Tewksbury

Margaret Tewksbury, wife of Lasell's third
President, Dr. Blake Tewksbury, is a friend
indeed of the Lasell family and recent alumnae.
During their five years on campus, Mrs.
Tewksbury was a most gracious hostess at the
President's home on Woodland Road.

A graduate of the Buckfield High School,
Buckfield, Maine, she holds degrees from
C. B. Post College in Worcester, Massachusetts,
and from the College of Practical Arts and
Letters, Boston University. She taught for six
years in Maine High Schools, and served
for three years on a Committee for study habits
at the Rye Country Day School in New York.

Prior to coming to Auburndale, the Tewksburys

lived in La Plume, Pennsylvania, where

Dr. Tewksbury — for 20 years — was President

of Keystone Junior College. There too, Mrs.

Tewksbury was famed for her gracious

hospitality.

The Tewksburys have two sons and one newly
acquired daughter-in-law. Mrs. Tewksbury
greatly enjoys antiques, music, weaving
and people.

We proudly present a Medallion to Margaret
Tewksbury for her continued friendliness,
service and interest in Lasell Junior College.



Dr. R. Emerson Sylvester

Dr. R. Emerson Sylvester, Director of the
College Health Service at Lasell, is one of
Newton's more prominent citizens. A graduate
of Tufts University and Boston University's
School of Medicine, he is presently Senior
Physician, Active Staff of the Newton-Wellesley



Hospital, where he has served as President of
Staff.

Within the City of Newton he has been
President of the Tuberculosis Association,
Director of District Nursing Association,
Director of the Auburndale Village Improvement
Association, and for 15 years has been General
Chairman of Halloween Parties for the City.

A Woodland Road resident, Dr. Sylvester is
extremely active in the local Centenary
Methodist Church, where he is currently
President of the Board of Trustees and has
served as Chairman for two capital fund drives.

For the past several years he has been a
member of the Board of Directors of the Boston
Wesleyan Association, publishers of Zion's
Herald and is serving at present as its
president; he is also a member of the Corpora-
tion and Board of Directors for Morgan
Memorial Incorporated. Dr. Sylvester is a
member of the Massachusetts Medical Society,
Fellow of the American Medical Association,
and a member of the Massachusetts Academy
of General Practice.

Dr. Sylvester claims his most outstanding
accomplishment is to have chosen a Lasell
alumna for his wife. She is the former
Arlene Wishart, a 1938 classmate of his
sister, Myrtle Sylvester Ensor.

Dr. Sylvester, father of two daughters and a
son, is sincerely dedicated to his profession
and particularly to his obligation to the
entire Lasell College family.

We are indeed pleased to present a Medallion
to Dr. R. Emerson Sylvester." ��



Junior College



or Early College?



by James W. Stanley
Director of Development



During the past few months, there has been
considerable publicity devoted to a new
educational institution in these parts — Simon's
Rock College in Great Barrington, Mass.
First opened in 1965 as something of an experi-
ment, the college will graduate its first class
this June.

Simon's Rock is a girls' college with a present
enrollment of about 200. What makes it
noteworthy — even in educationally sophisti-
cated Massachusetts — is the fact the
whole institution is pitched two years below
normal levels. Girls enter the freshman class at
age 16, aften ten years of schooling, rather
than at 18 with 12 years behind them, the rule at
other colleges. They then graduate at age
20 after what the institution's founder, Mrs.
Elizabeth Blodgett Hall, insists is a complete
college experience.

Simon's Rock, in other words, encompasses the
last two years of high school and the first two
years of college. Mrs. Hall dislikes the term
"junior college" — who doesn't? — preferring the
phrases "early college" or "middle college".
She predicts that by the end of the century
not only Simon's Rock but many other colleges
will have shortened the basic educational
process by two years, and will be granting
Bachelor degrees at age 20, after ten years of
preparation and four years of "early college".
For those who wish to continue, there will
then be either a three-year Masters program,
or vocational specialties.

What is interesting to Lasell in all of this is —
despite the talk about innovation and
educational progress at Simon's Rock — this
seems to be exactly what the Lasell brothers
had in mind when they came to Auburndale in



1851 — their new female seminary was intended
to prove their conviction that the proper
educational unit for young women, if not for
young men as well, was the last two years
of high school and the first two years of college.
That was the way Lasell was started; that
was the way it continued for 90 years until the
lower grades were dropped in the 1940s.
Simon's Rock is plowing new ground one full
lap behind.

Much of this early history now seems to have
been forgotten, even at Lasell itself which
often appears unduly modest about its
truly amazing record as an educational pioneer.
Yet the documentation is clear.

By far the most exhaustive study of Lasell's
early days was completed in 1939 for the
American Association of Junior Colleges by
Theodore Halbert Wilson, formerly president of
the University of Baltimore. At that time the
junior college movement (basically started by
the Lasells) was well established, and
variations were being proposed. One of these
was the so-called "four-year junior college",
advocated by President James M. Wood
of Stephens College, Missouri.

Dr. Wilson e^mined Lasell's origins in a five-
page article in the Junior College Journal
(April, 1939). His conclusions:

1 . "(Lasell) antedates by nearly half a century
President Harper's mention of junior
colleges." (President William Rainey
Harper of the University of Chicago is
credited with, or blamed for, coining the
phrase "junior college" in 1896. He
said somebody ought to invent such a
thing.)




2. "It antedates by more than 50 years Mr.
Merrill's recommendation of the 6-4-4
plan of organization." (In 1908 a San
Francisco educator, George A. Merrill,
proposed an educational division much like
Simon's Rock today.)

3. "It antedates by three score years and ten
President Wood's proposal that the last two
years of high school be combined with

the first two years of college."

Even in 1851, Dr. Wilson noted, Lasell's
curriculum was clearly on a college level.
Edward Lasell had, of course, come to Auburn-
dale from the recently established Mount
Holyoke Seminary, and from Williams College
(where he had been at age 19 the youngest
valedictorian in Williams' history and, later, at
age 25, a full professor of chemistry).

"The parallelism between the offerings at
Williams College and at Lasell Seminary is
obvious," he commented. "The parallelism
between the offerings at Mount Holyoke
and at Lasell is likewise evident."

This early philosophy of education at Lasell was
reviewed and clarified in the Lasell catalog
for 1874-75. This declared:

"Young people of ages 15 or 16 to 18 or
19 should be grouped together in one
administrative unit.



"This unit should include the last two years

of high school and the first two years of

college.

"The course of study during this four-year

period should emphasize general education

rather than specialized training."

In this connection, it is interesting to read

in other early catalogs that Lasell classes took

Harvard examinations without being aware

of their origin. Their success in the tests

was taken as evidence Lasell's new educational

theories were valid.

So it is ironic today to find another institution,
Simon's Rock, putting new blazes on Lasell's
old trail, while Lasell is content to follow
more conventional highways. Its initial four-
year concept was never proved unsound
educationally; it was slowly abandoned during
the 1940s when, in effect, the popularity
of the junior college crowded out the lower
grades, and wartime conditions made it difficult
to maintain both. Lasell never returned to its
previous pattern.

Perhaps it should. In complete fairness to
Mrs. Hall at Simon's Rock, it must be admitted
that if the idea made sense 120 years ago, it
probably makes even more sense today —
especially in view of her theory that "early
college" should lead to a Bachelor degree, not
simply to the junior year somewhere else.



Today's students are more mature than ever
before. Mrs. Hall maintains today's tenth
grader is the equivalent of the 12th grader a
generation ago; she is probably correct.
Certainly our youth is healthier, better fed.
Schools are better. Students today have access
to a whole range of educational aids not
available a generation ago — language
laboratories, audio-visual devices, closed
circuit television, improved textbooks.
Teaching is better; educational budgets are up.
There is surely no compelling reason why



10






we cling to a centuries-old educational format
when, with the present steady improvement
in both learning and teaching, we ought to
be able to compress the old 16-year track
into 14.

Certainly Mrs. Hall is going to try. In her view,
Simon's Rock is not preparatory for college,
even senior college — it is college. Inevitably
she will have to prove her case before she
can grant an A.B. degree — or even receive
accreditation — but at present she is full of
confidence. Fortunately she needs help from
neither foundation nor federal government; her
father was the late Thomas H. Blodgett,
chairman of the board of the American
Chicle Corporation, and the money to establish
Simon's Rock, as well as the property itself,
came from his estate.

It also appears she has started something.
Two years ago the Carnegie Foundation made
grants to four private schools for boys — Exeter,
Andover, Lawrenceville and the Hill School —
asking them to explore the possibility of
adding two years of college work to accomplish
exactly Mrs. Hall's purpose. No final
conclusions have been announced, but now
the College Entrance Examination Board is also
reported to be interested.

So where does this leave Lasell? With some
questions, obviously; it may be our alumnae
have the answers. Should the college resume
the experiment it ended inconclusively 25
years ago?



qualified to get into many colleges including
Lasell?

Would Carnegie Foundation be willing to help
with such an experiment in the institution
that started the whole idea in the first place?

Such questions must ultimately be answered,
of course, by Lasell's administration and
trustees, at least to the extent of deciding
whether to pursue such an innovative program.
Meanwhile, expressions from our alumnae
would be of real interest. Would you want your
daughter to enter Lasell at the tenth grade for a
full but telescoped college career? Theoreti-
cally she would not need to go on after
Lasell unless she wanted a graduate degree, or
further professional training. Or would you
feel this would apply still more pressure to
youngsters already trying to do too much too
fast?

Would such a pre-admission policy avoid the
present college-application selection rat-race,
or simply advance it two years?

Do you feel students today stay in school too
long, finally emerging at age 22 without an
employable skill? Or is the steady extension of
formal education a measure of progress?

We welcome your views. ��



Should we experiment again with a program to
admit a few bright, goal-oriented tenth
graders and try to give them the equivalent of
four years of college by age 20?

Would such a program be of particular interest
to black students who, because of inferior
high school backgrounds, are often not



11



What Has Happened to the Class of 1969?



The placement office has received the
following information from the class of 1969 on
their current activities. This year, for the
first time, these lists were compiled solely
from information submitted by members of the
class themselves, rather than from the
institutions to which they transferred or from
other sources. Of the 397 questionnaires sent



by the College, according to Mrs. Juliette
Fager, Director of Placement, 195 responded
with the information contained in
these lists; of these, 88 are presently
transfer students at other colleges and univer-
sities, and 107 report job placement since
graduation.



Name

Ahearne, Kathleen
Ashton, Sue Ellen
Barr, Cynthia

Barr, Kathryn

Barry, Jane
Bingel, Margaret
Bonney, Judith Ann

Boyle, Laurel
Brooks, Linda
Citro, Linda
Clapp, Martha
Clark, Mary Beth
Coe, Anne

Cole, Adele

Conboy, Mary Anne
Cooper, Dana
Cooper, Kathleen
Damon, Jennifer
Davis, Aviva
Davis, Mary Jane
Davis, Nancy
DeVito, Janet

Doherty, Judith
Donovan, Kathryn
Eager, Elizabeth
Englund, Karla
Evans, Linda Ellen
Faber, Lynn
Fahrbach, Barbara

Farrar, Martha
Farrell, Nancy
Ferrick, Susan
Gavin, Jean
Gimbel, Betsy
Goebel, Gail
Goldenberg, Nancy
Greenberg, Marilyn
Guenther, Diane
Guinan, Sharon
Hitchins, Rena
Holbrook, Sarah
Howard, Lucy



PLACEMENT LIST — 1969 GRADUATES

Position

Instructor — Day Care Center, Boston City Hospital

Head Teller Trainee — Society for Savings, West Hartford

Head Teacher, 4 year olds — Creative Country Day School

lona College (Evenings)

Junior Clerk — Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (until February)

University of Massachusetts — Entrance February 1970

Flight Stewardess — American Airlines

Secretary/Underwriter — George F. Brown & Sons, Insurance

Secretary, Science Department — Boston University

Boston University — Part-time

Stewardess — Pan American World Airways

Assistant Manager Training Program — Franklin Simon & Company

Medical Secretary — Thomas J. Giblin, Jr., M.D., Waltham

Secretary — Peterson, Howell & Heather, Baltimore, Maryland

Secretary — Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration

Teacher, Pre-First Grade — Westfield Private School, Brockton

Bridgewater State College (Evenings — 2nd Semester)

Nurses' Assistant — Melrose-Wakefield Hospital

Massachusetts Bay Community College (Evenings)

Secretary/ Receptionist — F. Schumacher & Company, Boston

Assistant Buyer & Executive Trainee — Filene's, Worcester

Assistant Buyer — Mercantile Stores Company, New York City

Nursery School Teacher — Dreamwold Country Day, Scituate

Medical Secretary — Children's Hospital, Boston, Orthopedic Department

Medical Secretary — Lahey Clinic, Boston

Executive Training Program — Macy's, New York City

Nursery School Teacher (afternoons) — White Plains, New York

Also: Attending Dominican College of Blauvelt — Education Major

Nursery School Teacher — Pulsifer ABC Nursery School, Newton

Secretary — Trust Department, Brookline Trust Company

Secretary to Coordinator, Staff Education, New England Baptist Hospital

Policy Coding Computer — Kemper Insurance Company, Boston

Legal Secretary — landiorio & Grodberg, Patent Attorneys

Secretary to Manager Special Reports, Sheraton Corporation of America

Assistant Section Secretary, Radio Frequency Engineering Department,

Grumman Aerospace Corporation, New York

Banking Office Secretary — State Street Bank & Trust Company

Medical Secretary — Freddie N. Peterson, M.D., Wayland

Junior Executive Trainee and Assistant to Merchandising Manager, Grover Cronin's

Executive Training Program — Sears, Roebuck & Company, Boston

Clerical and Sales Work — Book Store, Kansas State University

Staff Nurse — Greenwich Hospital

Secretary to Vice President Corporate Advertising, J. Walter Thompson Co., New York City

Secretary — Cummings and Lockwood, Attorneys, Stamford, Connecticut

Staff Nurse — Newton-Wellesley Hospital

Public Relations Work — Xerox Corporation, Boston

Executive Secretary — Morgan, Lewis and Bockins, Attorneys, Philadelphia

Secretary, Guest Services — Honeywell, Incorporated, Wellesley

File Clerk for Manpower (Working at Sylvania)

Boston University or Boston College, School of Education — Entrance January 1970



12



Name



Position



Hughes, Susan

Jewell, Lydia

Johnston, Regina Bonano

Judd, Susan

Kanoff, Judith

Kaull, Janet

Keller, Carole

Kreter, Kathleen
Krug, Shelley Gray
Koed, Linda
LaCoe, Suzanne

Lambert, Nancy
Langer, Mary

Lavyne, Carol
Lazaroff, Lynne
Loguidice, Candace
Luskin, Linda
McCabe, Cynthia
McCarthy, Meredith
McCotter, Marcia
Mancuso, Nancy Ann
Manoogian, Sharon
Marabello, Cynthia

Margolis, Shelley
Moore, Phyllis
Moss, Catherine
Muller, Linda
Murphy, Sharon
Murdock, Sheila
Nichols, Suzanne
Olson, Janis
Paquette, Sarah
Robarts, Rebecca
Rondeau, Marie
Ross, Cynthia
Rotondo, Georgeen
Salzer, Margaret
Saresky, Gayle
Satterfield, Linda
Schnelwar, Susan
Schwartz, Shirley

Scribner, Colleen
Seay, Margaret
Shea, Maureen
Sherman, Brenda
Shore, Stephanie
Sibley, Melinda
Solberg, Linda-Marie
Sorgman, Bernette
Soux, Linda
Spagnoli, Emily
Stanley, Janet
Telega, JoAnn
Thompson, Susan
Twomey, Patricia
Umanoff, Laurie
Weil, Wendy
Whitehead, Nancy
Woolfort, Wendy
Yas, Marilyn

Zullo, Charlene



Team Leader Nurse — Leonard Morse Hospital, Natick

Kindergarten Teacher — Robert Day School, Cambridge

Teacher, Grade 6 — Most Holy Rosary School, Perth Amboy, New Jersey

Medical Secretary — Dr. deForest, New Haven

Secretary — Yukon Office Suppiy Company, Anchorage, Alaska

Secretary, Sales Team — IBM Corporation, Cambridge

Teacher — Frondelea Developmental Nursing School, Hicksville, Long Island

C. W. Post of Long Island University, Brookville — Evenings

Legal Correspondent Trainee — American Photocopy Equipment, Evanston

Assistant Teacher — Green Acres Day School, Waltham

Medical Secretary — John E. Haye, M.D., Framingham

Staff Nurse — Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston University Met College — Part-time

Medical Secretary — Robert M. True, M.D.

Secretary — Albany Medical Center Hospital

Ski School Desk — Magic Mountain, Londonderry, Vermont (Winter work)

New Accounts Department — Capital Bank & Trust Company, Boston

Copywriter, Advertising Staff — Grover Cronin's, Waltham

Medical Secretary for general surgeon (Connecticut)

Medical Secretary — Edward C. Kattany, M.D.

Medical Secretary — Matthew Cushing, M.D., Andover

Cashier — University of Massachusetts Bookstore, Amherst

Head Nurse — Montclair Community Hospital

Secretary — S. C. Johnson & Son, Incorporated

Teller — State Street Bank & Trust Company

Kindergarten Teacher

Framingham State Teachers College — Part-time

Staff Nurse — Children's Hospital

Staff Nurse — Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey

Secretary/Receptionist — MIT Center Advanced Engineering Study

Staff Nurse — Long Island Jewish Medical Center

Nursery School Work — Middlesex County Hospital

Bank Teller — Somerset Hill County National Bank, New Jersey

Charge Nurse, Nursery — Boston Hospital for Women, Lying-in Division

Staff Nurse — St. Vincent's Hospital, Worcester

Aide Assistant — Edward Street Day Care Center, Worcester

Saleswoman — Hurwitch Brothers, Wellesley

Staff Nurse — Massachusetts General Hospital

Head Teacher — Auntie Thubs Nursery and Pre-Kindergarten, Montreal

Staff Nurse — Winchester Hospital

Secretary to Director Public Relations, Diners Kugazy Travel, New York

Secretary — Polychem Corporation, New Haven

Assistant Buyer — Gilchrist Company, Boston

Secretary to Analyst of Stocks — Loomis Sayles & Company, Boston

Charge Nurse — Lowell General Hospital

Northeastern University — Part-time

Staff Nurse — Massachusetts General Hospital

Teacher Assistant/ Aide — Head Start, Framingham

Medical Secretary — J. Frederick Harrington, M.D., Framingham

Secretary — Blue Cross-Blue Shield, Boston

Secretary — Biological Laboratories, Harvard University

Staff Nurse — Emerson Hospital, Concord

Group Life and Health Accounting — Massachusetts Mutual Life, Springfield

Staff Nurse — Boston Hospital for Women

Secretary — Vironic Systems, Amityville, New York

Service Representative — Public Relations, Business Office, New England Telephone

Secretary to Coordinator Executive Recruitment — Belk Stores Ser., Charlotte, North Carolina

Assistant Buyer — Gilchrist's, Boston

Medical Secretary — Matthew J. Janesics, Jr., M.D., East Braintree

Commission Secretary, Town of Needham, Park and Recreation Commission

Child Care Worker — Jewish Child Care Association of New York

Unit Control Manager — Bloomingdale Brothers, Incorporated, New York City

Staff Nurse — New England Deaconess Hospital, Boston

Secretary to Vice President, Sales Department — Business Equipment Corporation, Boston

Saleswoman — Shop for Pappagallo, Chestnut Hill (Temporary)

Towson State College or Suffolk University — Entrance January 1970

Medical Secretary — Doctors Griffey, Pierce & Cheren, Framingham



13



1969 GRADUATES ACCEPTED FOR FURTHER EDUCATION



Name

Albom, Shelley
Berger, Judith
Blumenthal, Susan
Bohmfalk, Charlotte
Cameron, Derelyn
Campagna, Valerie
Chandler, Joanne
Chesley, Jan
Christian, Patricia
Cooke, Susan
Corrao, Theresa
Correnti, Melanie
Cowan, Christine
Cromer, Nancy
DeVito, Janet
Drossos, Marguerite
Dubin, Jacqueline
Eager, Josepha
Eaton, Barbara
Eicoff, Audrey
Fortunato, Georgia
Geremia, Christine
Germaine, Sherri
Glass, Laura
Goldsmith, Barbara
Goldsmith, Beth
Goodrich, Paula
Gordan, Jane
Goss, Sandra
Greany, Diane
Greenberg, Jill
Greene, Joyce
Hartsig, Susan
Hartstone, Anne
Hausman, Robin
Hilden, Louise
Hulton, Susan
Jewell, Sally
Kagno, Marcia
Kinross, Kathleen
Lavitt, Carol
Layng, Sally
Leach, Sherry
Leavitt, Constance
Lehan, Deborah
Lewis, Deborah
Lieberman, Diane
Lione, Linda
Louis, Jill
Macaione, Kim
Mandravelis, Faye
Marcus, Susan
Marquess, Alice



College or School

University of Miami, Coral Gables

Temple University

American University

State University of New York at New Platz

Simmons College

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Boston University School of Education

University of Alabama

Boston University

Upsala College

Springfield College

University of Bridgeport

Katharine Gibbs School, Boston

Parsons School of Design

Dominican College of Blauvelt

Curry College

Hillsdale College

University of Georgia

Boston University, College of Liberal Arts

University of Miami

Boston University School of Nursing

C. W. Post College of Long Island University

University of Bridgeport

Boston University, College of Business Administration

George Washington University

Betty Owen Secretarial School, New York City

Hofstra University

Lesley College

University of Arizona

University of Colorado, Boulder

Boston University

New York State University at Potsdam

Boston University School of Education

Wheaton College

Boston University

C. W. Post College of Long Island University

University of Connecticut

Boston University

Boston University, School of Education

University of South Carolina

University of Massachusetts

University of Miami, Coral Gables

Southeastern Massachusetts University

Boston University School of Education

Boston University

Newark State College

Boston University School of Education

Cornell University School of Nursing

Roanoke College

University of Massachusetts

Boston University

University of Miami

Boston University School of Education



Major

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Sociology

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Art Education

Sociology

Biology

Elementary Education

Art Education

Secretarial

Graphic Design

Education/Social Studies

English

Education

Art/Interior Design

Sociology

Child Study

Nursing

Mathematics

Elementary Education

Business Education

English

Secretarial

Elementary Education/Psychology

Elementary Education

Elementary Education



Biology

Elementary Education

Sociology

English

History

Spanish, Clothing/Textiles

History

Elementary Education

French

Sociology

Commercial Art

Sociology

Elementary Education

Occupational Therapy

General Elementary Education

Early Childhood Education

Nursing

English

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Elementary Education



Name

Marsh, Yin-Chin
Martin, Marcia
Meyer, Ellen
Meyer, Susan
Michaelson, Ellen
Miller, Linda
Mitchell, Mary Ann
Morris, Jean
Murchison, Charlotte
Nelson, Janice
Newberg, Janice
Nicoll, Jane
North, Terri
O'Ravitz, Sandra
Parker, Deborah
Pomeroy, Anne
Robbins, Deborah
Rosenberg, Paula
Rubenstein, Alice
Rovner, Debbi
Sheerr, Patricia
Sheffer, Janet
Smith, Sonia
Tarter, Ruth
Tom, Jacquelyn
Trilling, Lois
Turnbull, Judith
Turner, Kathryn
Walker, Janet
Weiner, Joanne
Weiss, Dorrit
Wills, Pamela
Wood, Virginia



College or School

American University

American University

Adelphi University

Wheelock College

University of Massachusetts

Drexel Institute of Technology

University of Hartford

Central Connecticut State College

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Boston University

Boston School Cytotechnology

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Boston University School of Education

University of Connecticut

Maryland Institute College of Art

Trinity College

C. W. Post College of Long Island University

American University

University of Colorado

Boston University

Parsons School of Design

Gwynedd-Mercy College

American University

New York University Heights

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Boston State College

University of Illinois, Chicago

Boston University School of Education

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

University of Wisconsin

Katharine Gibbs School, New York

Elmira College

Gorham State College



Major

Chinese/Far East Area Study

Sociology

Nursing/Social Work

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Fashion Merchandising

Secondary Education/Spanish

Elementary Education

Medical Technology

Education w/Social Science, Case Evaluation

Cytology

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Education

Graphic Design

English

Sociology

Broadcast/ Journalism

Asian Studies/Far East

Elementary Education

Fashion Illustration

Elementary Education

Sociology

History

Fine Arts/Art Education

Kindergarten/ Primary

History

Childhood Education

Sociology

Education

Secretarial

Psychology .

Kindergarten/ Primary



ATTENTION

ALL
O's and 5's

1970's Alumnae Weekend

is

June 12, 13, and 14

Save the weekend

and watch for
more information



15



Engagements



Barbara Jacoby '60 to Harvey Adelstein
Mary Wheaton '62 to Raymond L. Coakley
Beverly Issokson '63 to Robert S. Levine
Karen Skooglund '63 to Stephen C. Bartow
Susan Dangel '65 to Stephen C. Jockers
Meredith Gowdy '65 to Harry P. Meislahn
Lois MacKenzie '65 to Richard L. Elia
Catherine H. Sanford '65 to Kenneth J. Nurmi
Susan Warnick '65 to John A. Krueger
Leslie A. Berger '66 to Melvin M. Frankel
Carol V. Bettman '66 to John R. Hebbe
Maura J. Dale '66 to George C. Thorsen, Jr.
Linda J. Fagan '66 to Peter S. Casey
Suzanne N. Golfe '66 to Michael A. Rosenberg
Polly Merrick '66 to Edward E. Shumaker, III
Susan Ruby '66 to Marshall I. Pomer
Lynne Sintros '66 to Jack N. Dercaw
Barbara L. Titus '66 to Charles Spaulding, Jr.
Elspeth M. Anderson '67 to Steven R. Blauvelt
Virginia Beecher '67 to Harley L. Parker, Jr.
Daphne Cole '67 to Daniel W. Keeler, Jr.
Lynne Davis '67 to Peter E. Fallon
Carol S. Dorfman '67 to Steven A. Gould
Jacqueline L. Frost '67 to Ronald DiPerna
Karen R. Furman '67 to Leon Pelz
Donna Garrow '67 to C. Peter Johnson
Connie-Lee Hammond '67 to Lee S. Carter
Carol S. Liska '67 to Paul R. Keating
Catherine McGrath '67 to John F. Hersey
Nancy Moorefield '67 to Edward L. Shead
Pamela Robie '67 to Forest A. LaValley



Patricia A. Thatcher '67 to John R. Woodford
Lynne C. Akeson '68 to John A. Arimenta
Christine A. Copeland '68 to Marshal E. Johnson
Melissa A. Derby '68 to Lt. Richard P. Oettinger
Jane L. Levine '68 to Joseph S. Lombardi
Joyce M. McCarthy '68 to James E. Kehoe, Jr.
Carol L. Spindler '68 to James R. Picciano
Dale Tufts '68 to Glenn A. Yale
Kathleen M. Ahearne '69 to David R. Pedrick
Anne Alford '69 to Second Lt. Ralph S. Maloney, USMC
Frances P. Allen '69 to Paul A. Ingraham
Annabelle Barnett '69 to Marshall J. Levinson
Judith A. Chambers '69 to Steven C. DeWitt
Kathleen H. Conway '69 to Walter S. Emerson, Jr.
Henrietta DiCroce x-'69 to David J. Jackman
Karla W. Englund '69 to John H. Thompson
Barbara J. Fahrbach '69 to Airman 1.C. Theodore W.
Li bath

Tina Goldsmith '69 to Charles J. Pacheco

Diane Guenther '69 to Duane L. Keeler, II

Margery E. Hunt '69 to David K. Harmon

Linda Kelterborn '69 to George V. Milbury

Susan Layng '69 to Warren F. Bogle, Jr.

Shelley Margolis '69 to Gordon M. Daniels

Leonita A. Natale x-'69 to Robert M. Senno

Gilah Rutstein '69 to Jeffrey D. Quinttner

Sheila Ryan '69 to Thomas R. May

Nancy Sengstaken '69 to Daniel C. Wright

Melinda Sibley '69 to Mark V. Brown

Kimberly F. Smith '69 to Frederick E. Cluthe

Margeretha M. VanWoerkom '69 to William L. Beason, J



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE 1968-1969 ALUMNAE FUND

Note: An "L" in front of a name indicates life member; an "x" , a non-
graduate giver. Names of other life members appear at the end of each
class list.



All classes before 1906

Total contribution: $518.00



1895

Mabel Taylor Gannett

1896

Lestra Hibberd Saxton

1896-97

Bessie Brainard Schmadeke



1899

L Evelyn Ebert Allen
L Alice Jenckes Wilson



1902

Georgie Duncan Seavey
L Clara McLean Rowley
x Cora Stone Trimmer

1903

Agnes Drake Foss
L Edith Ebersole Doud
Lx Helen Ebersole Swartzel

x Sara Lawrence White

x Lucia Parcher Dow

1905

Hazel Carey Adam
Margaret Henderson Soule

x Argenta MacDonald Carothers

x Eleanor Percy Irish

Other Life Members

Harriet L. Freebey '95
Emma Aull Duncan '98
Alice R. Kendall '99

1906

Total contribution: $95.00

Chairman
Helen Carter Kenway

Contributors

L Mildred Peirce Wise
x Elizabeth Polhemus Rockwood

L Maude Simes Harding
x Elizabeth Thielens Miller
x Mary-Florine Thielens Peeples
Lucy Wilson Errett (deceased)

Other Life Members
Helen Carter Kenway
Dorothea Turner Moulton
Elsie Young Hayden

1907

Total contribution: $682.50

Chairman
Lilian Douglass Heeb

Agents
Alice J. Chase
Fern Dixon Leahy



Contributors

x Ruth Adams Whiston

Alice J. Chase
L Fern Dixon Leahy
L Lilian Douglass Heeb
Lx Jennie Drew Hinman
x Carre Fuller Eldridge

Clara F. Nims
x Sadie Peckham Mayers
x Carrie Sessions Dodge
Mr. George C. Dodge

1908

Total contribution: $195.00

Contributors
L Grace Emerson Cole

x Ethel McCorkindale Harwood
L Charlotte Ryder Hall

x Florence Stark Burnham

Other Life Members
Grace T. Griswold
Elizabeth Love Macey

1909

Total contribution: $65.00

Contributors
Constance E. Blackstock
x Gertrude Leonard McClanahan
Florence Swartwout Thomassen
Dorothy Wells Seller
Katherine H. Wheeler

Life Member
Annie Crowe Collum

1910

Total contribution: $186.00

Contributors

L Nell Corneal Drew
x Lucy Cox Nelson

Margherita Dike Hallberg
L Mary Lumbard Courtney
(deceased)

Ina McLean Hunt

Marguerite Murdock

Mildred Snyder Grant

M. Cornelia Stone
L Josephine Woodward Rand

Other Life Members

Julia Crafts Sheridan (Trustee)
Mildred Goodall Fairbanks
Julia Hamilton Peters

1911

Total contribution: $70.00

Contributors
Vera Bradley Findlay
x Dorothy Frost Frost
x Margaret Thacher Drury

Life Members

Elizabeth Brandow Trumbull
Marion Ordway Corley
Marion Shinn



1912

Total contribution: $250.00

Chairman
Ruth Coulter Bierer

Agents
Charlotte Lesh Coats
R. Marjorie Risser Blackwell

Contributors
Agnes Adelsdorf Weil
Ruth Coulter Bierer
Elizabeth Edson
Mary Goodwillie Townsend
Marion Joslin Oppenheimer
Charlotte Lesh Coats
Berenice Lincoln Beers
Annie Merrill David
Clara Parker Colby
Jane Parsons Westervelt
R. Marjorie Risser Blackwell
C. Pearl Townsend
Winifred Whittlesey Knowlton

Life Members
x Hazel Drew Adair

Florence Jones Allen
x Sara Shuttleworth Houwert

1913

Total contribution: $1 72.00

Contributors
Alma L. Bunch
xJean Humbird Dickason
x Ruth Stokes Crick
x Edessa Warner Slocum
L Mildred Westervelt Warner
Adelle Wilson Moffett

Other Life Member
Ruth Trowbridge Brown

1914

Total contribution: $378.00

Chairman
Mary Quick Dean

Agents
Angeline Emery MacCulloch
Ruby Newcomb McCorkindale
x Dorothy Smith Tolman

Contributors
x Ruth Adt Stephenson

Helen Gaird Vance

Mary H. Bingaman

H. Alleda Burnett Arneson
L Ruth Davis Giller

Elsie L. Doleman

Myra Eby Craighead

Angeline Emery MacCulloch

Marcia Fogg Moore

Dora E. Goodwillie

Dorothy Hartshorn Underwood

Carolyn B. Moore

Ruby Newcomb McCorkindale

Mary Quick Dean

Helen Rollins Fisher

Mildred Smith Leach

Charlotte Swartwout Quackenbush

Nellie Youngers Henkle



Other Life Member
Lois Brader Buckner

1915

Total contribution: $363.00

Chairman
x Madeline Farmer Ryder

Contributors

Irene Ball Sill

Margrethe M. Bauman

Elizabeth Beach Bierer

Ida Beane Rice

Katherine Bingaman Heron
x Doris Brien Tamm

Catherine Carter Rasbach
x Madeline Farmer Ryder

Frances Johnsen Edwards

Ida Laubenstein Moyer
L Ada F. Patterson

Clara Paton Suhlke
x Emma Robinson Petrie

Martha Schumann Laubenstein

Doris Waller O'Hara
L Nell Woodward Collins

Other Life Member
Myrtle Brix Spongier

1916

Total contribution: $831.00

Chairman
Marion Griffin Wolcott

Agents
Dorothy Crane Crowe
Frances Harris Spear
Maude Hayden Keeney
Carol M. Rice

Contributors

x Rose Baer Trexler
Gertrude Baker Davis
Marion Beach Barlow

x Wilda Berkey Cartland
Dorothy Brate McPherrin

x Elizabeth Carleton Stillman

x Marjorie Collins Cisco-Smith
Dorothy Crane Crowe
Lavinia Fera McKinney
Helen J. Foster

M. Adolphia Garnsey Ettinger
Helen S. Gerrett
Marion Griffin Wolcott
Sarah Hammond Brookes
Ruth Harris Frank
Lena Hauck Johnson
Maude Hayden Keeney
Marian Lerch Mehle
Dorothy Mathias Bates
Eleanor McCarty Thomas
L Helen Merrill Strohecker
Florence Morris Smith
Mildred Ordway Brahana
Helen Overholser Towle
Carol M. Rice
Elizabeth G. Richards
Madeline Shelton Herfurth
Mabel Straker Kimball
Alma E. Sweet

x Margaret Trice Gibbens
Dale Whipple Turnbull
Charlotte Whiting Clark

x Natlie York Terry



1917

Total contribution: $522.00

Chairman
Ruth Burnap Jones

Agents
Florence Bell Merrill
Dorothy Deering Ewart
Nora Hayward Rodd

Contributors

E. Gertrude Allen
x Lillian Astill Ainsworth

Ruth Burnap Jones

Dorothy Deering Ewart

Edith Hobson Fricke

Alice Jenks Nickerson

Helen Lesh Zerfas

Virginia Moore Starkey

Marjorie Morrison Coburn
x Carita Palmer Moffett

Lenette Rogers Atkinson
L Helen M. Saunders

Ruth Straight Mock
L Mildred Strain Nutter

Mary Louise Taylor Gish

Other Life Members
Helen Bauman Roblin
Florence Bell Merrill
Fannie Gates Frey
Jessie Shepherd Brennan
Helen Stephan Sterley

1918

Total contribution: $645.00

Contributors
L Lydia Adams Godsoe
L Dorothy Barnes Paine

Mildred Cary Hill
x Harriet Fera French

Helen Hart Lind
x Marian Harvey Higgins
Barbara McLellan McCormick
Ruth B. Newcomb
x Almira L. Shepard
Helen Smith Stone
Roxana Stark Burns
L Gail Wilson Boynton

1919

Total contribution: $297.00

Chairman
Mercie V. Nichols

Agent
Edith Abbott Chapman

Confr/bufors

Edith Abbott Chapman

Miriam Bell Bell
x Judith Burbank Brown

Olive Chase Mayo

Frances Coombs
x Mary Eshleman Willauer

Dorothy C. Hall
x Ruth Lapham Lyle
x Alice McFarland Dunlop

Helen Moss Post
x Elizabeth Moyer Wilson
L Mercie V. Nichols
x Maria Orozco Cobb (Faculty)

Marian Owen Pollard

Ethel Ramage Lougee

Edith Vance Nicolson

Helen Webster Fitz



1920

Total contribution: $260.00

Chairman
Freda Griffin Leining

Agenfs
Dorothy Burnham Eaton
Eloise Carey Wad ley
Marion Eaton Gumaer
Lillian G. Grant

Contributors
Frances Adams Pastene
Dorothy Burnham Eaton
Eloise Carey Wadley

L Anna Crane Sherwood
Marion Eaton Gumaer
Josephine Florence Preusse
Lillian G. Grant
Freda Griffin Leining
Alice Grimes Griffin
Ruth D. Hayden
Beulah McFarland
Margaret Perley Downey

L Katherine Rice Broock
Margaret Stewart Bartlett

x Ruth Wardle Livingston

Other Life Members
x Carolie Abrams Painter

Elaine Bass Pierce

Doris Crawford Clovis

Isabel M. Fish
x Katherine Moss Shriner

1921

Total contribution: $1287.50

Chairman
Helen L. Beede

Agents
Pauline Butler Poore
Lillian Doane Maddigan
Mary King Sargent
Mildred Knight Norwood
Esther H. Story

Confr/bufors
L Helen L. Beede
Doris Bissett Bryant
Thelma Blossom Ross
Pauline Butler Poore
L Lillian Doane Maddigan
Dorothy Edwards Rogers
Dorothy Ely Bigham
x Edith Geeson Seewald

Mary King Sargent
L Mildred Knight Norwood

Margaret Loomis Collingwood
L Ruth Rowlings Mott
Doris Sanborn Adams
Feme Smith Hodgins
L Esther H. Story
x Katharine VanFleet
x Sarah Wild Gordon

Other Life Members

x Helen Jacobs
Gladys V. Lucas
Julia Russell Robertson

x Mary C. Shannon

1922

Total contribution: $1635.00

Chairman
Harriette Case Bidwell



Agenfs

Ethelle Cleale Collett
Jean Field Faires
Marjorie GifTord Grimm
Josephine Holbrook Metzger
Marjorie Lovering Harris
Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker
Mabel Rowlings Eckhardt
Theresa Thompson Osborne

Contributors

Carolyn Badger Seybolt
L Iverna Birdsall Lutze

Dorothy Caldwell Jordan
L Harriette Case Bidwell

Miriam Chollett Bershon

Miriam Dailey Taylor

Jean Field Faires
L Grace Gates Brown

Marjorie GifTord Grimm
L Helene Grashorn Dickson

Eleanor Knight Bowering
x Elizabeth Laughlin Wadsworth

Marjorie Lovering Harris
L Elizabeth Madeira Campbell
x Marjorie Norris England
x Bertha Phelps Bogg
L Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker
L Mabel Rowlings Eckhardt

Margaret Reid Perry

Thelma Schweitzer White

Mayno Seltzer Richmond
L Barbara Smith Huntington

Dorothy Smith Stefanides

Louise Stevens Prince
x Marion T. Weidman
x Marion Westphal Newhall

Louise Weymouth Thompson

Other Life Members
Frances Angel Levenson
Ethelle Cleale Collett
Violet Comley Peirce
Sarah F. Crane
Florence Day Wentworth
Josephine Holbrook Metzger
Louise Jackson Davol
Theresa Thompson Osborne

(Trustee)
Jean Woodward Nelson

1923

Total contribution: $438.00

Chairman
Toni Meritt Smith

Agent
Carolyn Colton Avery

Contributors
x Marion Austin Hakewessell

Elizabeth Chandler Healy
L Carolyn Colton Avery

Anne Dougherty Slater

Ruth Dinsmore Sayward

Adrienne Fontaine Caron

Helen Hinshaw Toohey
x Lisinka Kuehl Dawson

Ida A. Markert
L Toni Meritt Smith

Dorothy K. Millspaugh
x Louise Orr Daniels

Claire Parker Everett

Helen F. Phillips

Evelyn Shidler Robertson

Jessie Watters

Doris Wilde Lobdell

Other Life Members

Ethel Cole Hoose
x Ruth Emery
Ruth Hills Livermore



Ruth Hopkins Spooner
Marjorie Lowell Weeks
Adrienne Smith Stone
Louise Woolley Morgan

1924

Total contribution: $576.00

Agents
Elizabeth Anderson Hanna
Edith Clendenin Stahl
Matilda Dougherty Linn
x Helen Davis Worthington
Helen B. Perry
Helen Robson Hamill
Maude A. Wilcox

Contributors

Elizabeth Anderson Hanna

Frances W. Badger
L Dorothy Ballou Collier

Dorothy Barnard

Adele Bigham Nelson

x Dorothy Brown Inman

L Edith Clendenin Stahl

Matilda Dougherty Linn
x Helen Davis Worthington

Edith Hadley McLean
L Katharine Knox McClaren

Margaret Lonval Epps

Helen Robson Hamill

Katharine C. Webb
L Maude A. Wilcox

Geraldine Wilder Bogart
L Alice Wry Anthony

Other Life Members
Lucile Norris Leyda
Helen B. Perry (Trustee)

1925

Total contribution: $461.00

Agents
Martha Fish Holmes
Dorothy Hagadorn Taylor
Estelle L. Jenney
Martha Wilcox Hills

Contributors'
Blanche D. Avery
Catherine Beecher Wood
Helene Berkson Hoover
Helen Black Sprague

x Barbara Bridgman McHenry
Lois Bryant Warner
Christine Chamberlin Kenney

x Ethel Clow Black
Dorothy Cook Hagen
Barbara Cushing Jenkins
Martha Fish Holmes
Dorothy Hagadorn Taylor
Louise Hegeman Whitman
Katherine Kelley Gaul
Gertrude Kendall Lund
Estelle L. Jenney
Jessie Matteson Ray

x Mary Saunders Houston
Ruth Shepard Parmenter
Virginia Smieding Fenn
Sylvia H. Solari
Eleanor L. Steele
L Helen Wahlquist Shenning

Other Life Members
Ruth A. Buffington
Helen McNab Willand

1926

Total contribution: $355.00



Contributors
x Natalie Albury Boswell

Margaret Anderson Gage

Dorothy Aseltine Wadsworth
x Bernice Cunningham Smith

Mary Freeman Wisdom
L Dorothy Hale Brown

Mildred Hamlin Mather

In Memory: Anita Krakauer Doerr

Hazel Kramer O'Donnell

Grace Lawrence Groves
x Muriel L. McLauthlin

Gertrude Moeller Baum

Emma H. Ockert

Ruby Rice Troup

Madeleine Roth White

Charlotte Russell Pellini

Doris Schumaker Walthers

Elizabeth Smith Lum







Other Life Members
Margaret Beck Hamlin
Helen Duncan Devereux
Sara Mackay Roblin
Elinor Stevens Stockman



1927

Total contribution: $462.00

Chairman
Esther T. Josselyn

Agents
x Gladys Boardman Amos
Sylvia Chandler Hooker
Minerva Damon Ludewig
Elinor Day Conley
Clarice Haines Nevers
Loretta Krause Eyer
Marjorie Maxfield Smith
Rosanna McConnell Wallis
A. Katheryn Royce
Elizabeth Selkirk Chipps
Edith Thorpe VanDine

Contributors
Lx Gertrude Bicknell Harvey

Edith Bronstein Silverman

Sylvia Chandler Hooker

Minerva Damon Ludewig

Elinor Day Conley

Lucy Field Wildman

Clarice Haines Nevers

Virginia Hight Wilder
L Esther T. Josselyn

Loretta Krause Eyer

Elizabeth Lloyd Dean
L Lucy MacLeod Helm

Marjorie Maxfield Smith

Rosanna McConnell Wallis

Ethel Noyes Hathaway

A. Katheryn Royce

Evelyn Suor Butterworth

Edith Thorpe VanDine

Katherine Tufts Wiese

Virginia Wellington Fauver

Helen White Parker

In Memory: Mary Etta Williams
Sharpe

Other Life Members
Lilly Butters Schwartz
Alice Crawford
Madalyn Patten Hoberg
Madeleine Robinhold Leinbach
Janette Smock Simpson

1928

Total contribution: $410.00

Chairman
Lillian G. Bethel



Contributors
Margaret Basley Irwin
Lillian G. Bethel
Evelyn Bostel Dotterer
Christina Finlayson Dana
Kathryn W. Forgey
Mary Goodwin Culver

x Alice C. Graham
Helen Hawes Loomis
Helen Head MacFarland
Caroline Hopkins McLean
Edith Hussey Adams

x Bernice Kent Ennis

x Julia Klingensmith Frey
Evelyn Ladd Rublee
Josephine Laughton Hopkins
In Memory: Barbara E. Lawson
Katherine Paige Colon
L In Memory: Mary Pryor Miller

x Anna Rainey Bonner
Hester Shaw Gordon

x Helen Shew Schofield
L Marjorie Winslow MacCuspL

Other Life Members
Margaret Behrens
Margaret Newman
Mary Timmins Moulthrop

1929

Total contribution: $997.00

Chairman
Alice Pratt Brown

Agents

Katherine Braithwaite Woodworth
Julia Clausen Bowman
Emily Crump Ramstetter
Dorothy Hayward Sutherland
Harriet Hewins Sanderson
Harriet Holt Buker
Marion Kingdon Farnum
Betty Lyman Zsiga
Helen Ohm Kingsman
Marjorie Parrish Green

Contributors

Esther Angel Frank

Preble Borden Gruchy

Katherine Braithwaite Woodworth

In Memory: Mrs. Sarah A.
Braithwaite

Charlotte Brooks Armstrong

Frances Brown Winthrop

Constance Chalmers Harlow

Julia Clausen Bowman

Dorothy Cole MacRae

Margaret Contrell White

Emily Crump Ramstetter

Isabelle Daggett Wilson

Katharine Edwards Bennett

Dorothy England Chester

Barbara Goodell Trott

Jane E. Gray

Mary Groff Cooper

Muriel Hagerthy Meikle

Annette Harvey Jensen
L Dorothy Hayward Sutherland

Harriet Hewins Sanderson

Harriet Holt Buker

Eleanor C. Humphrey
x Helen Jones Macon
L Marion Kingdom Farnum

Betty Lyman Zsiga
x Marguerite Mcllvain Ricker

Catherine Morley King (Deceased)

In Memory: Catherine Morley King

Helen Ohm Kingsman

Myra Page Haven

Marjorie Parrish Green

Eleanor Pitcher Hansen
L Alice Pratt Brown

Marion Roberts Dyer

Ruth Rowbotham Strickland



Marjorie Schaller Schoonmaker
Jeannette Smith Orne
Louise Thompson Rondelli
Elizabeth Wells Turtle
Maude Williams Gittleson
L Helena Willson Hanson
Barbara Wilson Steele
Ellen Zacharias Cullen

Other Life Members
x Ruth Beckley Brown

Rosamond Cornell Cannon
Ruth Richards Stripp
Marion Simpson Lunt

1930

Total contribution: $390.00

Chairman
Frances Smith Miller

Agents

Priscilla Barber Fitch
Joan Collier Cooper
Elizabeth Day Cook
Jeanette Gessner Somers
Helen Morgan Riederer
Elinor R. Taylor

Contributors
Dorothy Camin Rozan
Joan Collier Cooper
Elizabeth Day Cook

L Clara Dietz Rosenburg
Kathryn Dow Mathes
Jeanette Gessner Somers
Marjorie Hubler Kiefer

L Dorothy Inett Taylor
Harriet Kimberly Coale
Eleanor McKenney Black
Dorothy Meeker Pearce
Helen Morgan Riederer
Sylvia Morgan Williams
x Ruth Richardson Pease
Frances Smith Miller
Elinor R. Taylor
Dorothy Young Heath

1931

Total contribution: $256.00

Chairman
Mildred Bell Cole

Agents

Ruth Bee Jackson
x Marjorie Keller Mayer

Lenna Lyon Hill
x Jane Porter Brown

Ruth Rohe Smith

Helen M. Schaack

Dotha Warner Jope

Ruth Winslow Neulieb

Frances Wynkoop Benjamin

Contributors

Elizabeth Bear DeStaebler

Mildred Bell Cole

Betty Condit Kessel

Karin Eliasson Monroe
L Sarah B. Fletchall

Clara Giarla Albiani

Virginia Hinshaw Wilks

Ann Louise Houlihan

Jane Hupman Preston

Marion Inglis Leonard
x Marjorie Keller Mayer

Lenna Lyon Hill

Marjorie Magune Curtis

Aline Paull Ireland
x Jane Porter Brown

Ruth Rohe Smith

Pearl Thompson Hasey



Dotha Warner Jope
Frances Wheeler Sawyer
Blair Whittier Shepardson
Ruth Winslow Neulieb

Other Life Member
Virginia Riley Richardson

1932

Total contribution: $309.00

Chairman
Gertrude Hooper Ring

Agents
Marjorie MacClymon
Elizabeth Page Sealey
Marjorie Tarbell Quandt

Contributors
L Charlotte Cahners Glass
Blanche Dougherty Horsman

x Jane Ellison Ragan

x Carol Griffin Teich
Mildred J. Guyett
Katharine Hartman Macy
Gertrude Hooper Ring
Gertrude Horner Mosher
Margaret V. Hrubec
Enid Jackson Giles
Eugenia Loomis Flagler
Marjorie MacClymon

x Nathalie C. Mosher
Elizabeth Page Sealey
Natalie E. Park
Betty Parrish Newman
Annamelia Paxton Wildman
Minerva Pritchard Barratt

x Phyllis Rhinehart Collins
Elinor Small Domina
Marjorie Tarbell Quandt
Frances Turner Sleigh

x G. Althea Ward Weatherhead

x Mary Whitaker Briggs

Other Life Members

Julia C. Case
Edith Parsons Booth

1933

Total contribution: $210.00

Chairman
Shirley Gould Chesebro

Agents
Grace Dunne Walker
Barbara Edmands Place
Dorothy Guest Harney
Jeanne Heilig Noack
Elizabeth Mclntire Bennert
Anna Mills Koeck
Virginia Ogden Hayes
Charlotte Phillips Wilkins
Wilma Silvernail Berry
Harriet Smith Rawson

Contributors
x Eunice Andrews Brooks
Helen Bardua Childs
Helen C. Burwell
Dorothy Day Funk
Hope Decatur Rowland
Grace Dunne Walker
Barbara Erickson Rogers
Alice Fernandez Harkins
Shirley Gould Chesebro
Dorothy Guest Harney
Jeanne Heilig Noack
Amorette Larcher Skilton
Maude Lee Bliss
Charlotte F. M. Ockert



L Virginia Ogden Hayes
Elizabeth Schuller Stark
Mary Shiveley McNeill
Wilma Silvernail Berry
Jane V. Spear
Ruth Stafford Clark
x Emeline Walker Fatherley

Ofher Life Members

x Laura Dietz Rudginsky
Angelita Santiago Gebelein

1934

Tofal contribution: $370.00

Contributors

Kathleen Atkin Torcom

Bettina Cook Kalbach

Roberta Davis Massey

Edith Downey
x Helen Dunlap Kayes
x Caroline Frey Anderson

Helen Gibbs Studley

Helen Hall Streeter
L Mabelle Hickcox Camp

Jane Jensen Bailey

Marjorie Jones Hopkins

Barbara Kerr Marshman
L Virginia Leahy Berwick

Dell L. Masterjohn

Carol Morehouse Jones

Gwen Murray Larsen

Bettina Potter Janse

Alice Schrade Vander Voort

Eleanor Young Antoun

Ofher Life Member
Celia Kingsley Percival

1935

Total contribution: $500.00

Chairman
Eleanor Gebelein Greene

Contributors

Betty Jane Allenbaugh Weller

Harriet Colwell Reeves

Marion Cruickshank Manning
x Eleanor Dippel Reed

Charlotte Eames Terry

Eleanor Gebelein Greene
L Barbara Iris Johnson
L Barbara King Haskins

Roberta Leonard Matthews

Marjorie Long Maish

Barbara McKelleget

Eleanor Meyer Gere

Josephine Moore Alexanderson
L Roberta Morrill Buchanan (Faculty)

Gertrude Morris MacCallum

Barbara Ordway Brewer

Ruth Ann Putnam Jackson

Bernice Silva Davis

Caroline Smith Goodwin

Sally Swanson Dahlberg
L Molly Upham Menges

Virginia White Wardwell
L Priscilla Winslow

Priscilla Wood Caverly

Barbara Young Leach

Other Life Members
Sophia Latchis Lyras
x Miriam Nichols
Eleanor Ramsdell Stauffer
Mary Jane Selby Guerry

1936

Total contribution: $483.00



Chairman
Ruth Buswell Isaacson

Agents
Marjorie Bassett MacMillan
Bili Baxter Perkins
Virginia Hausler Heath
Margaret Pearl Ide
Ethel Stroud Hartley
Martha Sweetnam Pearson
Charlotte Weitzman Kaplan

Contributors

Selma Amdur Heringman

Jane Arend Durbin

Marjorie Bassett MacMillan

Bili Baxter Perkins

Ruth Buswell Isaacson

Barbara Darcey Thomas

Phyllis Gunn Rodgers

Virginia Hall Warren

Virginia Hausler Heath

Emily Hubbel Weiss

Natalie Hutchison Clouser

Virginia Johnston Loud

Jeanne M. Keck

Arlene Kerr Sonnabend

Ruth Keyes Wendt
L Margaret Pearl Ide

Marjorie Reed Colley
x Sylvia Savitz Taylor

Adelaide Seeley Bull
x Adelaide Shaffer Campbell
L Audrey Smith Henderson

Martha Sweetnam Pearson
x Georgianna Taber Cotter

Charlotte Weitzman Kaplan

Deborah York

Carolyn Young Cate

Other Life Member
Muriel Ray Hunt

1937

Total contribution: $953.00

Chairmen

Louise Tardivel Higgins
Priscilla Paramenter Madden

Agents

Dorothy AcufF Stone
Frances Austin Beaumier

x Anne Campbell Terrill
Dorothy Coffin Amon
Irene Dreissigacker Brimlow
Jane Eldridge Meaney
Helen Flint Moody
Louise Hedlund Mercer
Marjorie Hills Buffington
Barbara Lane Roper
Glennys Preston Allicon
Rae Salisbury Richards
Lois Small Redden

x Anne Tipton Gardner
Louise Visel Redfield
Virginia Webb Tompkins
Barbara Wheeler Sampson

Contributors
Dorothy AcufF Stone
Frances Austin Beaumier
Ruth Buchanan Lenart
x Anne Campbell Terrill
Flora Chicos Theodore
Dorothy Coffin Amon
Eleanor Cole Keeler
Adele deL'Etoile Breitenstein
Irene Dreissigacker Brimlow
Jane Eldridge Meaney
Ruth Fitzgerald O'Brien
Helen Flint Moody
Dorothy Forsstrom Spotanski



Marjorie Gilbert Wiggin

Barbara Harding Kakas

Louise Hedlung Mercer

Marjorie Hills Buffington

Lucille Huse Chappell

Betty Olson Cooper

Madeline Orcutt Arthur

Janet Owens De Arment

Priscilla Parmenter Madden

Glennys Preston Allicon

Alcine Rippere Gager
x Mary Ruth Sanford Hall

Emily Saxton Braman

Meta Searles Hopkins
L Marian Sleeper Hall

Lois Small Redden
x Viola Smith Williams

Florence Stetson Pipes
L Louise Tardivel Higgins (Trustee)

Evelyn Towle Slotnick (deceased)

Virginia Webb Tompkins

Marjorie Westgate Doran

Augusta Williamson Lips

Elizabeth A. Wisdom

Countessa Wood Hall

Isabel Wyatt Asselta

Ofher Life Members
Betty Harrington Van Huysen
Margaret Harris Abreu
Eleanor Kenney Hettrick

1938

Total contribution: $509.00



Chairman
Arlene Wishart Sylvester

Agents
Winifred Aldrich Chapoton
Ruth Fulton Griffin
Margaret Jones Howry
Elizabeth Leland Kibbe
Eleanor Pierce Puffer
Mildred Royce MofFett
Faye Wadhams Smith
Elizabeth Yeull Collins

Contributors
Winifred Aldrich Chapoton
Jean Allen Bird
Virginia Amesbury Stone

x Eleanor Ayers Ware

x Hersilia Baker Enz

L Betty Black Boynton
Joanne Bohaker Smith
Elizabeth Clark Brighton

x Mary Frigge Teschner
Ruth Fulton Griffin
Mary Jane Holton Bohling
Barbara Jeppesen Thomann

L Margaret Jones Howry
Florence Kent Parks
Dorothy B. Keyes
Janet Kunkel Funkhouser
Elizabeth Leland Kibbe
Elizabeth Lloyd Fritch
Eleanore Leoffler Olsen
Margaret T. McEnerney
Ruth Meighan Gillette
Elaine Meiklem Sargent
Carole Myers Lowe
Harriet Newcomb Stoughton
Eleanor Pierce Puffer
Elizabeth Putnam
Jean Randall Dockham
Dorothy Schwarz Foster

L Lee Shepard Wilgus
Jane Sherman O'Brien
Audrey Slawson Drake
Audrey Spiller Smalley
Elizabeth Sylvester Robinson
Myrtle Sylvester Ensor
Faye Wadhams Smith



Virginia Wilhelm Harshbarger
Arlene Wishart Sylvester
Elizabeth Yeuell Collins

Ofher Life Members

Priscilla Barker NefF
Mildred Birchard Pentheny
M. Adele Brown
x Eleanor Dresser Gross
Constance Hatch Herron
Mildred Royce MofFett
Alice M. Seidler

1939

Total contribution: $599.00

Chairman
Margaret Schneider Thieringer

Agents
Ruth Conklin Anderson
Jeanne Daniels Wheeler
Margaret Fish Allsopp
Helen Forsberg Powers
Norma Jacobus Riddle
Janice Marr Demer
Cora Pratt Gillett
Helen Richardson Bonander
Ruth Shepard Cushman
Harriet Tifft Longley
Marian Traxler Crum
x Ruth Waldron Anderson

Contributors
Barbara Albrecht Minnig
Nancy Allen Schmetzer
Doris Benecchi Del Colliano
Margaret Christiansen Marbach
Jeanne Daniels Wheeler
Katharine Farnell Guay
Margaret Fish Allsopp
Helen Forsberg Powers
Helen Henderson Chillingworth
Norma Jacobus Riddle
Betty Jensen Curtis
Louise A. Johnson
Jane Leckie Tracy
Janice Marr Demer
Phyllis McCormick Farmer
Cora Pratt Gillett
Vyrling Rawson
Helen Richardson Bonander
Jane Robinson Williams
Margaret Schneider Thieringer
Barbara Small Walsh
Margaret Smith Wolcott
Georgia Pierce Steck
Mary Jean Schultz Waddell
Harriet Tifft Longley
Marian Traxler Crum
Betty Wallace White
Barbara Wells isham

x Eleanor Wentworth Person

x Janet Whitten Smith

x Dorothy F. Williams

Life Members

Marjorie Dietz Jacobs
Ruth Shepard Cushman

1940

Total contribution: $340.00

Contributors
Esther Bennett Quinlan
x Evelyn E. Bishop

Ruth Bowman Burrough
Elizabeth Carlisle Muller
Dorothy Cooke Leary
Delpha Corazza Marchetti
Janice Donavan Neal
Florence Evans McLaughlin



Marion E. Gray

Jeanne Hubbard Brooks

Pat Kieser

Sibyl Lander Fletcher

Edythe MacDonald Dowd

Mary Mathews Dilts

Elizabeth Phillips Dick

Barbara T. Quirk

Julia Rankin Sprague

Susan Ridley

Grace Roberts Gummersall

Madelyne Rose Browne

Barbara Schilf Fournier

Jean Shaw Keary

Mary Shenk Darmstaetter

Ruth Sullivan Lodge

Miriam Tappan Gilbert

Barbara Wilkinson Hunt

Helen Woodward Fassett

1941

Total contribution: $653.00

Chairman
Virginia M. DeNyse

Agents
Jane Ansley Sundborg
Lucille Armand Boyle
Geralding Bixby Averill
Jean Bohacket Pegram
Susan Cairoli Peck
Jean Cooney Leitch
Kathryn Davis Almeida
Mary Doig Nicholson
Norma Forsberg Burman
Lucille Hooker Paterson
Janet Jansing Sheffer
Louise Lorion DeVries
Betty McGrath Brown
Dorothy Mellen Harwood
Elna Pollard Hanson
Alice Jean Townsend Kerslake
Ellen Visscher Taft
Marvine Weatherby
Lucille Wielandt Speight

Contributors

Jane Abbott Wiederhol
Mary Elizabeth Allen Ryan
Lucille Armand Boyle
Judith Birch Williams
Virginia Black DeLong
Nancy Bommer
Dorothy Brewer Carlson
Imogene Caney Fair
Josephine Caruso Kuchera
Athena Constantine Andersen
Jean Cooney Leitch
Elizabeth Danker Trenholm
Betty Davis Trow
Virginia M. DeNyse

L llene Derick Whelpley
Betty Dungan Norden
Gertrude E. Fischer

L Marian Fitts Sternkopf
Norma Forsberg Burman
Jane Gallup Devine
Mary Hale Shaner
Lucille Hooker Paterson
Jeannette Jahn Warren
Janet Jansing Sheffer
Nancy Keach Paine
Louise Lorion DeVries
Marie MacGregor Woodward
Dorothy Macomber Vannah
x Joyce Master Foster
Frances McBride Perkins
Betty McGrath Brown
Marjorie Mead Carlson
Dorothy Mellen Harwood
Lois E. Newton
Mary Sawyer Philpott
Grace Sheffer Hendrick
x Marion Thomas Ashenden
Marian Timpson Intemann



Marvine Weatherby
Lucille Wielandt Speight
x Marjorie Williams Lovejoy
Arax Zulalian Johnian

Other Life Members
Harriet Hanson Nelson
Charlotte Lakeman Patt
Dorothy Stuhlbarg Kopple

1942

Total contribution: $644.00

Chairman
June Cherry Bruns

Agents
Elizabeth S. Allen
Marjorie Allyn Merrill
Shirley Armstrong Blount

x Jean Barnes Butts
Marion Beers Jamieson
Barbara Berkman Sherman
Marcia Corey Hanson
Eleanor Easterly Vogt
Shirley Egglefield Schless
Nancy Gorton Ross

x Margaret Grover Scott
Margaret Homan Kreter

x Phyllis Johnson Klein

x Helen Keenan Centlivre
Nancy Larsen Holbrook
Constance Lynch Walsh
Katherine Nannery Rafferty
Barbara Rockwell Tweddle
Ruth Turner Crosby

Contributors

L Elizabeth S. Allen
Marjorie Allyn Merrill
Shirley Armstrong Blount

Lx Jean Barnes Butts

Barbara Berkman Sherman
Doris Bracher Jenkins
June Cherry Bruns
Helen Cizek Niedringhaus
Marcia Corey Hanson
Mary Dobson Lincks
Jean Ferrell Howe
Mary Ann Fisher Espy
Mildred Fraser Pauley
Louise Freeman Coombs
Dorothea F. Godfrey

L Nancy Gorton Ross
x Margaret Grover Scott
Nina Hobson Mellor
Margaret Homan Kreter
x Phyllis Johnson Klein
x Helen Keenan Centlivre
Barbara Kelly Morell
Arline Kreider Roberts
Nancy Larsen Holbrook
Doris Leach Almeida
Barbara Leonard Wiser
Margot Moore Harley
Dorothy Mosher Stone
Katherine Nannery Rafferty
x Virginia Nestler Whitney
Sally Nolan Williams
Winifred Northrup Mudge
Marjorie Ray Blackett
Helen Raymond Schwable
Virginia Robinson Nast
Barbara Rockwell Tweedle
Ruth Roughgarden Frank

L Mildred Slaunwhite Straw
Kathryn Starkey Litehiser
Ruth Turner Crosby
Arline G. Walter
Barbara Walworth Starr
Virginia Weeks Hatch
Anne Witney Shea

1943

Total contribution: $476.00



Chairman
Jeanne A. Revene

Agents
Gertrude Baninger Duquette
Frances Beebe Jones
Mildred Bond Fincken
Carolyn Boyce Richards
Jean Burroughs Rawson
Frances Church Sampson
Dorothy Coffin Bauer
Jane Glassbrook Hamilton
Elizabeth Gorton Collier
Marilyn Isenberg Barnes
Lynn Kuch Jones
Elinor Kuchler Hopkins
Dorothy Marr Peckham
Eleanor Millard Parsons
Eloise Moffet Harper
Nathalie Monge Stoddard
Elizabeth Moore Young
Barbara S. Pearson
Elaine Towne Batson
Joyce Wagner West
Shirley Wolcott Wells

Contributors

L Gertrude Baninger Duquette

Mildred Bond Fincken

Carolyn Boyce Richards

Carol Brumond Allen

Jean Burroughs Rawson

Fay Chapin Adams

Frances Church Sampson

Dorothy Coffin Bauer
x Jane Cook Cardoza
x Clare Di Tullio Marchionne
Lx Phyllis Edmiston Olstad
L Elizabeth Gorton Collier

Marilyn Isenberg Barnes

Mary Ledbetter Basteun

x Dorothy Lingo Stebbins

L Grace Marble Philbrick

Eleanor Millard Parsons

Eloise Moffett Harper
L Nathalie Monge Stoddard

Barbara S. Pearson

Persis Pendleton Howarth

Jean Perry Thompson

Jean Phillips Canning

Priscilla Redfield Potter

Janet Reid Sherwin
L Jeanne A. Revene
x Jeanne Robinson Beardsley

Barbara Schaufele McBride
L Elizabeth Schmidt Morrill

Barbara Scott Wilson

Virginia Shaw

Harriet Smillie Boynton

Olive N. Swanson

Jane Tarbutton Travis
x Barbara Thornburg Donnelly
L Joyce Wagner West

Other Life Members

Priscilla Houghton

Marjorie Langworthy Hegeman

Martha Maddock Heffner

Joan Moller Brown

Elsinor Prouty Mallory

1944

Total contribution: $375.00

Chairman
Virginia Wolfe Perkins

Agents

Anne Calder Dick
Betty Fleer Cooper
Millicent Greason Booth
Shirley Haviland Woody
Margaret Hermann Raiche
Lorrayne Hron Reynolds
Eleanor Kimmey Shaw



Ruth Perkins Goodwin
Elfreda Reck Dubin
Peggy Revene Winans
Barbara Staples Virgie
Dorothy Tobin Staffier
Imogene Williams Genewich

Contributors
Evelyn Allen Clune
Elizabeth Burpee Crooker
Jacqueline Campbell Lumbard
Jean Campbell
Jodie Coudon McCluskey
Jessie Doig Clark
Mary Donnelly Chapman
Betty Fleer Cooper
Marion Gooding Christensen
Barbara Goodwin Flint
Shirley Haviland Woody
Margaret Hermann Raiche
Lorrayne Hron Reynolds
Suzanne Lange Riddlemoser
Joe Leroy Bramm
Jane Maynard Robbins
Dorothy Nickerson Tehan
Ruth Perkins Goodwin
Priscilla Perley Kerans
Elfreda Reck Dubin
Peggy Revene Winans

L Ann Scott Thompson

Dorothy Tobin Staffier
x Bette Walsh Schwartz

L Virginia Wolfe Perkins

Other Life Members

Eleanor Del Bianco Kosow
Norma Dietz Tarlow
M. Shirley O'Connor

1945

Total contribution: $442.50

Chairman
Dorothy Piper Bottalico

Agents
June Ahner Gilroy
Eleanor Bradway Lammers
Lillian Feneley Cooley
Naomi Lederman Grossman
Marion Munro Waitt
Priscilla Otis Drew
Barbara Preuss Reynolds
Drucilla Roberts Bickford
Susanne Ross Westberg
Elsie Simonds Follett
Susan Slocum Klingbeil
Martha Stonebraker Ely

Contributors

June Ahner Gilroy

Lorraine Anderson Crabtree

Constance Arley Brown

Jane Baringer Wordsworth
x Miriam H. Black
x Margaret Brickett Sawyer

Ursula Burns Keely

Jane Calderwood Price
x Alice Carr Polley

Janet Chesson Hale

Marguerite Clark McManus

Bernice Coyne Boon

Ruth Davis Burk

Jane A. Dittrich

Lillian Feneley Cooley

Dorrit Gegan Green

Shirley A. Gleason

Elizabeth Groth Johnsen
x Mary Elizabeth Hamill Meagher

Carol Hauber Mitchell

Jean Henry Goggins

Mary Elizabeth Kelleher Dorsey
x Marilyn S. Keyes

Florence Loizeaux Ritchie



Elaine Macdonald Aldrich
Bette McEwen Price
Marilyn McNie Middlebrook
Lynn Metzger Pharo
Gwen Norton Mercer
Marjorie Olson Bjork
Priscilla Otis Drew
Constance Pettigrew Edie
Barbara Preuss Reynolds
Drucilla Roberts Bickford
Susan ne Ross Westberg
Henrietta Sharpe Smith
Martha Stonebraker Ely
L Althea Taylor Goldberg
Terry Tounge Park
Claire Tracy King
Barbara Wentworth Dean
Doris Winkemeier Dieffenbach

Other Life Members
Emma Gilbert Carver
x Elizabeth D. Knox
Naomi Lederman Grossman
Elaine McQuillan Marston
Susan Slocum Klingbeil

1946

Total contribution: $455.00

Chairman
Marjorie Norris Harris

Agents
Marilyn Blodgett Hall
Margaret Harman Salisbury
Mary Jane Magnusson Megroz
Lee Parker McBurnie
Constance Wilbur Dowden



Contributors
Marilyn Blodgett Hall
Raemary Chase Duryea
Carolyn Coleman Peyrot
Mildred Day Clements
Marilyn Dickson Liebenguth
Rose Emer Bucalo
Ruth W. Goldner
Margaret Harman Salisbury
Barbara Harris Ryan
Audrey Hill Kennison
Elizabeth Kendall Hunter
Patricia Luther Wilkin

x Eloise Macintosh Dexter
Mary Jane Magnusson Megroz
Patricia Marland Lasnier
Deborah Newton Warren
Ruth Nordstrand Emery
Marjorie Norris Harris
Norma O'Shea Delaney
Lee Parker McBurnie
Valerie Pertsch Bartholomew
Nancy L. Peterson
Louise Pool Langley
Janice Schuelke Test

x Janet Stirn Martinsen
Claire Stolzenberg Manger
Carolyn Stuart Scantlebury
Jean Thiel Weld
Joan Walker Doane
Jean Watson Wetrich
Barbara Weeks Dow
Corinne Wilkins Staid

x Judith Woodbury Berenson
Kathryn Woolaver Parsons
Meri Zanleoni Goyette

Life Member
xJean Davis Putnam

1947

Total contribution: $772.00



Chairman
Joan Lambert Laffin

Agents
Margaret Beach Otis
Elaine Capone Hixon
Betty Jane Cnossen Whitehead
Millicent Entwistle Harmon
Joan Familton Gardner
Betsy Frew
Marcia Kesseli Allen
x Linda Koempel Tompkins
Margaret Leary Hacker
Betty MacNeil Lentini
Mary Murray Sutton
Rhoda O'Donnell Erickson
Mary Ellen Roberts Gill
Jean Sharron Strong
Elizabeth Waters Hartman

Contributors
Margaret Beach Otis
Carol Birath Dennison
Jane Bradley Anderson
Elizabeth Brady Hickey
Patricia Brunner Thiede
Sarah Cross Finigan
Elizabeth deChiara Capozzi
Millicent Entwistle Harmon
Joan Familton Gardner
Barbara Fenstermaker Kiley
Joan FitzGerald Cole
Charlotte Fletcher Kelly
Jeanne Franklin Bates
Betsy Frew

Phyllis Haviland Hildebrandt
Vestra Horton Kent
Jean Hubbard Midwood
Shirley Johnson Dow
Mollie Kendrick Pike
Mary Kinney O'Connell
Frances Lake Gray
Joanna Lamb Lewis
Joan Lambert Laffin
Marcia Landick Desmond
Margaret Leary Hacker
Joanne McMillan Mars
Jean Morgan Koenitzer
Mary Murray Sutton
Nancy Noble Ehrman
Rhoda O'Donnell Erickson
Marie O'Hare O'Neil
Dorothy Papani Palmer
Gertrude Powers Lawson
Marjorie Ross Lawrence
Ruth Small Stott
Janet Stearns Gille
Phyllis Sykes Brown
Marion Taylor Sanderson
Susan Voss Harrigan
Elizabeth Waters Hartman
Sally Waters Manning
Eunice Watson Crosen
Helen Widenor Bailey
Betty Williams McGowan
Patricia Zeigler Dillingham

Life Members
Nancy Collett Hendricks
Olga Diamond Lake
x Ruth Park Lanier

1948

Total contribution: $677.00

Agents
Virginia Bailey McAllister
Elizabeth Bain Hagerstrom
Joanne Block Nichols
Eyvor Briggs Gaskill
Janet Campbell Woodburn
Anne Chapman Berl
Mary Detwiler Fides
Muriel Diversi Cuddy



Carol Galligan Massard
Michelle Hires
Florence Keeney Havens
Martha Kennedy Ingersoll
Judith Macintosh Mennella
Lois McLucas Martin
Shirley Miller Carroll
Eleanor T. Munro
Dorothy Page Kuehl
Jacqueline Pfeiffer Lueth
June Smith Noreen



Contributors

Margaret Abrahamian
Jane Anderson Calhoun
Dorothy Azadian McKinnon
Virginia Bailey McAllister
Constance T. Barry
Betsy Curtis Winquist
Anne L. Behrendt

x Ann Bradford
Elaine Burrell King

x Virginia Butt Grey
Anne Chapman Berl
Miriam Day Butcher
Mary Detwiler Fides
Paula Drake Hodgdon
Joanne Eaton Friborg
Jane Edsall Jacobs
Barbara Ershler Levy
Carol Galligan Massard
Louise Gleason Chock
Ardell Goodman Baker
Patricia Greenhalgh Barrows
Ellen Grover MacVeigh

x Charlotte Guptill Norcross
Virginia Hall Anderson
JoAnn Hanson Long
L Florence Keeney Havens
Beulah Kwok Sung
Frances Lee Osborne
Sally Lindberg Hartnett
Judith Macintosh Mennella
Babette Mauer Williamson
Lois McLucas Martin
Jeanne Meyer Bird
Eleanor T. Munro
Ann Myers Beck
Janecke Naess BoMadsen
Barbara Noel Garvin
Barbara Noyes Walsh
Norma Noyes Bouchard
Nancy O'Rourke Trevisan
Dorothy Page Kuehl
Elsie Paulson Chapman
Jacqueline Pfeiffer Lueth
Dorothy Piranian Ryan
Barbara Rymer Cole
Betty Scott Swift
Mary Small Lee
June Smith Noreen
Barbara Street Berry
Shirley Sturm Bullard
Judith Tracy Shanahan
Doris Trefny landoli
Ann Truex Dickinson
Alice Vavoudes Lindblad
Dolores S. Winslow



Other Life Members

Elizabeth Bain Hagerstrom
Margaret Hanson Marion

1949

Total contribution: $1496.00



Chairmen

Nancy Lawson Donahue
Joanne Molan Wheaton

Agents

Carol Cedergren Salerno
Carolyn Clark Thomas
Pauline Donaldson Converse



Gloria Ellis Tompson
Elizabeth Felker Hancock
Mary Ellen Fiske Brubaker
Natalie Hall Campbell
Nancy Hayden Drooff
x Ann Mitchell VanDeusen
Ellen Morris Phillips
Kathryn Poore Hamel
Barbara Potier Grey
Priscilla Randall Hurter
Emogene Starrett Anderson
Joan Weiler Arnow



Contributors

Ann Ashley Sanderson
Diane Baird Jasset
Barbara Berry Roberts
Marjorie Boynton Anderson
Janet Bridgham Foss
Mary Bush Trunz
Barbara Childs Hussey
Carolyn Clark Thomas
Nancy Clarke Ryder
Jean Cook Jacobs
Nancy Curtis Grellier
Barbara Ann Davis Collins
Carol Dunn Polvere
Mary Ellen Fiske Brubaker

x Joan Franzosa Leland
Shirley Greenhalgh Fadley
Natalie Hall Campbell
Ann Hollett Munro
Martha Hurd Davenport
Joan Kennedy Johnson
Eva Laitinen Stromski
Janice Levenson Sherman
Maragaret Maclnnes Miller
Meredith McKone Krieger

x Ann Mitchell VanDeusen
Audrey Mitchell McKibben
Joanne Molan Wheaton
Ellen Morris Phillips
Nancy Newhall Mackay
Shirley Olesen Somes
Diane Palady Barry
Pamela Perry Atwood
Kathryn Poore Hamel
Barbara Potier Grey
Katherine Raizes Srameris
Priscilla Randall Hurter
Eleanor Ritchie Elmore
A. Marilyn Ross
Alice Smales Young
Frances Smith Macdonald
Joyce Stanley Pederzini
Virginia Towe Beck
Betty Vail Morrissey
Jane Wadhams Hazen
Joan Warren Hepburn
Joan Weiler Arnow
Blanche Westhaver Gauld
Dorothea Zuschlag Torgersen

Life Member
Nancy Lawson Donahue

1950

Total contribution: $1085.37

Chairman
Sally Hughes Fasick

Agents

Marilyn Bartlett Erratt

Margot Bergstrom Semonian

M. Ann Carpenter Towle

Joyce Davies Harrison

Lois Form Senft

Dorothy Goehring Rourke

Helen Graham Gordon

Joan Hahn Fern

June Handleman Gilmartin

Joan Harrington Price

Doris Oneal Becker



Contributors

Lillian Reese Roche
Joan Antun Rednor
Marilyn Bartlett Erratt
Eleanor E. Barton
Nancy Bean Lord
x Deborah Brush Morse
Nancy A. Burrows
Cynthia Butler Barnes
M. Anne Carpenter Towle
Barbara Chipman Will
Nancy Coggeshall Foose
Marcia Collingwood Martin
Jean Davies Stanley
Lois Dickerman Neugent
Mary Dodge Davis
Joan Dorau Hohorst
Gloria Drulie Schluntz
Laura Eckert Gatto
Marion Ettinger McDonald
Lois Form Senft
Dorothy Goehring Rourke
Sally Griffith Mathews
Lorraine Grontoft Sutton
Joan Hahn Fern
Janice Halligan Maria
Carol Haye Deal
Marilyn Haynes
Barbara Hires Baxter
Sally Hughes Fasick
Carol Husted Schneider
Betty Jones Bolton
Diane Krause Sherman
Ariel Leonard Robinson
Elizabeth Maclnnes Deal
Natalie Malin Foley
Janice McGoughran
Marilyn Munson Farrar
Marguerite Nahigian Sarkisian
Marilyn Newhall Kendall
Margaret Olson Belden
Doris Oneal Becker
Jean Ostrander Lowman
Jacqueline Paulding Hauser
Jane A. Perry
Anne Pomeroy Bailey
Lillian Reese Roche
Joan Robilotto Gibson
Ruth Rosebrock Hardie
Lois Schaller Toegemann
Winifred A. Schulman
JoAnne Secor Rier
Clara Silsby Lamperti
Carolyn Snook Rauscher
June Spottiswoode Beaulieu
Jacquelyn Temperley Dey
Dorothy Tomer Monahan
Joan Wallace Billings
Claire Wallis Harris
Carmen Welch Clark
Barbara Welles Smith
Helen A. Wetherbee
Jean Woods McNeilly

Life Member
Elaine Orth Rodey

1951

Total contribution: $508.00

Chairman
Joan Kearney Cormay

Agents
Elizabeth Baumbach Hyne
Marilyn Clark
Ann Fish Shriber
Joan Groccia Cowan
Shirley Hannafin Adams
Carol Hess Recco
Barbara Hill Breen
Charlotte Kelley Campbell
Jean Kilgore Owen
Rosalie Kolligian Demarjian
Joan D. LeFrank



Nancy Mitchell Quinn
Patricia Raeder Crone
Katherine Rothe Matson
Jean Schuster Robbins
Janice Weyls Moore
Mary Jane White Miller
Joan Williams Arnold
Robin Witt Mosher
Joanne Zeigler Dupen

Contributors
Norma Appleyard
Claudette Awad Razook
Georgia Bakes Sigalos
Kathleen Ballard Heck
Adele Barbeau Holden
Joan Barnett Atwood
Maureen Barry Steinfeldt
Elizabeth Baumbach Hyne
x Lorna Becker Harrington
x Gwendolyn Bennett Hedrick
Etta Burns Peters
Marilyn Clark
Nancy Cusack Smith
Edna Duge Watson
Martha Edwards Whippen
Libbie Fleet Glazer
Janet Fornoff Hauber
Priscilla Freeman McCartney
Margaret Gardner Larkin
Nancy Green Curry
Shirley Hannafin Adams
Carol Hess Recco
Barbara Hill Breen
Lois Hutchinson Woodward
Charlotte Kelley Campbell
Jean Kilgore Owen
Marjorie Kleindienst Guidera
x Marlene Maloof Saidnawey
Florence Mangan Putnam
Dorothy McPherson Wickersham
Roberta Morin Aronowitz
Ann Murray Reynolds
Beverly Pink Reynolds
Elaine Quavillon Tull
Patricia Raeder Crone
Nancy Roetting Clifford
Harriet Schwarz Hamilton
Joan Seremeth Teague
Barbara Sessions Reiley
Isabell Stanley Davis
Anna Stevenson Mangano
Alice Stover Kachline
Ann Van der Veer Lander
In Memory: Mary Ellen Wait
Nancy Webb Canepa
Joyce Weitzel Flanagan
Janice Weyls Moore
Mary Jane White Miller
Joan Williams Arnold
Robin Witt Mosher
Janet Woodward Powers
Janet Wyman Meade
Joanne Zeigler Dupen

Life Member
Mary Jane Clark Maurici

1952

Total contribution: $465.00

Chairman
Ann Rathburn Spadola

Agents
Nancy Cool Kaercher
Mary Diggs Stafford
Lois Hickey Treacy
Barbara Kane Mullin
Jean McCambridge
Eleanor Mekelones Marple
Naomi Peck Kroner
Barbara Rost Goodman
Nancie Shean Roth
Ann Woods Talbot



Contributors
Nancy Allen Banks
Jean Aslaksen Podimsky
Barbara Ayrault Smith
Elizabeth Beasley Petermeyer
Betsy Brown Cramer
Joyce Carroll Mulcahy
Pauline Coady Goodwin
Mary Comstock Singarella
Nancy Cool Kaercher
x Lois Dickson Glenzel

Ruth Easterlind Cederberg
Betty Lou Foy Reid
Carol Frank Sweeney
Teresa Giordano Martignetti
Phyllis Gleason Riley
Joan Hess Brand
Lois Hickey Treacy
Joan Hochstuhl Wallace
Joyce Kitfield Anderson
Joan Lee Crump
Betsy Lewis O'Donnell
Jean McCambridge
Eleanor Mekelones Marple
Joan Morrison Wilson
Marlene Murray Zuker
Merilyn Peck Erickson
Naomi Peck Kroner
Frances Peters Dunlevy
Joanne Purcell Brooker
Joeyna Raynal Rearwin
Marguerite Rudolf Mesinger
Joan Siebert Mege
Eleanor Silver Birger
Rena A. Silverman
Virginia Snedaker Marschall
Barbara Trout Krohn
Joyce Wardle Chapman
Phyllis Werblow Strompf
Pauline A. Zorolow

Life Members
Marilyn McGuire Levine
Dorothy Rich Anderson

1953

Total contribution: $591.00

Chairmen

Elsie Knaus Klemt
Elizabeth Sleight Dexter

Agents
Judith Brewer Campbell
Phoebe Byrd Gregory
Nancy Chase Ferguson
Ruletta Coats Stryeski
Leonora Coronella Krueger
Joan Darelius Chirnside
Louise Dawe Turner
Cynthia DeGelleke Cole
Evelyn Earle Lukeman
Sally Garratt Dean
Martha Gries Davis
Jeanette Roberts Mann
Harriet Hickok Brown
Barbara E. Howell
Doris Hungerford Zaenglein
Althea Janke Gardner
Marie Kaden
Jean Smith DiLeone
Beverly Thornton Hallowell
Virginia Wilder Melitz

Contributors

Joan Antupit Stillman
Nancy Bilezikian Kamborian
Molly Bondareff Krakauer
Barbara Brown Fitch
Jean Burke Johnson
Mary Louise Burke Alexander
Phoebe Byrd Gregory
Nancy Chase Ferguson
Ruletta Coats Stryeski
Elinor Cohen Goldman



Elaine Cowles Doolittle

Elaine Crook Birrell

Diane Cueny Harden

Joan Darelius Chirnside

Edith Davis Nixon

Louise Dawe Turner

Cynthia DeGelleke Cole

Shirley DeMund Hilgenberg
x Jane Doderer Sampson

Mary Ann Donahue

Joan Eckert Lowenstein
x Elizabeth Fried Slater

Judith Gardner Whitehouse

Doris Gartner Gould

Shirley Gibbons San Soucie

Joan Godfrey Emmert

Martha Gries Davis

Elaine Harper Johnson

Barbara E. Howell

Althea Janke Gardner

Elinor Johnson Palmer

Marie Kaden (Adm.)

Elsie Knaus Klemt

Claire LaLiberte Adler

Audrey Lang Clark

Carol Lindstrom Jobes

Theresa Lopas Speight

Kathleen MacGregor Randolph

Molly McBride Kalogeros

Lillian Medhurst Meiggs

Barbara Morris Louria

Carol Morse Woods

Greta Nilsson Masson

Helen Pearlstein Golden
x Constance Peterson Sloan

Sylvia Pfeiffer Nesslinger

Jeanette Roberts Mann

Donna Ross Wright

Joanne Schur Sommers

Elizabeth Sleight Dexter

Jean Smith DiLeone

Mary Thomas Justice

Audrey Thompson Rielle

Beverly Thornton Hallowell

Jean Weeks Hanna

Joan Wilckens Pittis

Virginia Wilder Melitz

1954

Total contribution: $852.00

Chairman
Sandra Reynolds Grant

Agents
Rita Keevers Claflin
Patricia Kelsey Scharf
Elizabeth Lindsay Buhler
Sandra MacDougall Sullivan
Ruth Paetz Braun
Joan Pickett Morrow
Sara Rojas Casarella
Carol Sharpies Pyle
Marilyn Taylor Ames

Contributors
Barbara Adams Owen
Carolyn Berghahn Whitman
Betty Born Deacon
Ann Bowerman Logan
Beverly Bruce Dandeneau

x Carolyn A. Bruns
Elaine Budarz Wiatrowski
Patricia Carpenter Field
Marguerite Chandler Brewer
Ann Chidsey Moebius
Susan Cluett Stocker
Shelia Collins Frank
Marion Crossman MacCallum
Sandra Davis Mather
Kama Erickson Feltham
Frances Everets Rosser
Patricia Flett Davidson

x Amy Frye Thorndike
Lenore Fuller Hoag
Anna-Mae George Wogan



Thelma Greenberg Florin
Judith Hansen Hull
Frances Hayden Stavnitzky
Nancy Hawk Gilbert
Priscilla Head Davis
Nancy Hedtler Ford
Shirley Herold Johnson
Joan Hildebrandt Estey
Norah Horsfield Maling
Nancy P. Horton
Roberta Horton Johnson

x Nancy Husted Koerner

x Sandra Johnson Grill
Susan Johnson Keane
Fruma Kaplan Kaufman
Rita Keevers Claflin
Barbara Kelly Thoresen
Ann Kennedy Duncan
Elizabeth Lindsay Buhler
Rosemarie Lochiatto Billy
Carolyn Marino Zentmaier
Jeanette Marvin Brown
Carole Mattucci Wall
Janet McElgunn Flynn

x Mary McLeman Brown
Carol Meyer LaViale
Sybil Moore Pinkham
Carol Moulton Hokanson
Beverly Mulock MacDonald
Catherine A. Murray
Nancy Notte Smith
Ann Olsen Schlubach
Ruth Paetz Braun
Deborah Paradise Mahony
Martha Phillips Fearing
Joan Pickett Morrow
Glenna Pofcher Bloom
Deborah Potter Waugh
Marjorie Price Johnson
Joan Rabbitt Downey
Sandra Reynolds Grant
Orelyn Rice Emerson
Margaret Robson Priddy
Carol Rofer Hofmann
Eleanor Sclare Mazur
Carol Sharpies Pyle
Shirley Sherwood Adams
Audrey Smith Ruggles
Harriet Solotist Grunberg
Nancy Swanson Horsfield
Janice Sweet Morsilli
Marilyn Taylor Ames
Jane Urtel Rogers
Priscilla VanDine Redmond
Joanna Ward
Janet A. Welch
Mary Patricia Wilson Kane
Helen Wood Queenan

1955

Total contribution: $832.00

Chairmen

Ann Harris Hughes
Mary Sweenor Ruggieri
Sally Warner O'Such

Agents
Marlene Berman Lewis
Rhea Cooney Simonds
Elaine Montella Butler
Joy Stewart Rice
Marilyn Valter Maclay
Abby Alderman Kleinberg
Betty Bod ay Fox
Ann Bottjer O'Donnell
Judith Bowen Drews
JoAnne DiPietro DiMarco
Priscilla Fenton Abercrombie
Ethel Griffin Browning
Barbara Hammett Mills
Diana Hendley Cooper
Charleen Herrling Smith
Barbara Karasik Davidson
June McLaughlin Lombino
Carol Merwin Robinson



Stephanie Purcell Barton
Hazel Schoppy Callahan

Contributors
Abby Alderman Kleinberg
June Anderten Seifert
Thelma Appel Kaplan
Ruth Birch Bastis
Betty Boday Fox
Ann Bottjer O'Donnell
Judith Bowen Drews

x Carolyn Caie Hathorne
Sue Cassan Jones
Rhea Cooney Simonds
Carol Ann Cunningham
Elinor Dana Righter
Carole Darsky Giller
JoAnne DiPietro DiMarco
Marion Domber James

x Darrylle Donahue Curran
Priscilla Fenton Abercrombie
Diane Flynn Passavant
Jane Gray Milne
Susan Gray Lichtenstein
Ethel Griffin Browning
Patricia Gura Conroy

x Judith Gushue Blythe
Barbara Hammett Mills
Joyce Happ Campbell
Genevieve Harold
Marcia Harrington McCarthy
Ann Harris Hughes

x Judith Hartnett Clavin
Diana Hendley Cooper
Judith Hulsman Buffington
Barbara Judd Ozinga
Carol Kenneally Gardner
Lois Kuhn Hopson
Judith Lanese Karazulas
Eleanor Lasky Lapides
Patricia Lee Oswald
Shirley MacDonald Biamonte
Mary Mack Gutsche
Jane Mclnnis Bennett
June McLaughlin Lombino
Anne Merchant Davis
Marilyn Meyer Herlin
Mildred Monahan Regan
Valerie Montanez Randolph
Elaine Montella Butler
Joan Murano Swanson
Lucinda Nicol Peterson
Linda Nolin Ahem
Lucinda Nolin Johnson
L Marion Nutter Bredehoft
Arlene Pariseau Cairns
Stephanie Purcell Barton
Cynthia Raymond Paalborg
Elizabeth J. Reynolds
Patricia Reynolds Fisher
Letitia Saglio Lycke
Beryl Schelhorn Frey
Hazel Schoppy Callahan
Barbara Schuster Klinefelter
Maxine Seidel Lindemuth
Audrey Silver Rogers
Barbara Smith Lynch
Caroljean Somers Irrgang
Sandra Stone Myerow
Dorcas Styles Hodgkins
Mary Sweenor Ruggieri
Angela Tabellario Mitchell
Susan Thomas Wiard
Mary Jane Tidman Bridges
Nancy Tisler Hurley
Barbara Travis Hendrick
Marilyn Valter Maclay
Sally Visel Hayes
Polly Waterman Weaving

1956

Total contribution: $765.00

Chairmen
Sandra Shelton Fitch
Amy Shuttleworth Jensen



Agents
Nancy Ahlgren Tewes
Alicia Albright Leach
Mary Augur Wallace
Judith Berger Hurwitz
Joyce Bliss Doyle
Beverly Breed Hovey
Judy Caswell Allen
Joan Conley Eid
Helene Driscoll Kukola
Thelma Epstein Lapides
Carol Fitzpatrick Harrell
Patricia Gammons Dodgen
Barbara Gorman Trice
Ann Hastings Peterson
Ann Hekemian Krikovian
Sally Herman DeRosa
Terry Kilgore Mannix
Elizabeth Larrabee Martin
Carol LeCompte Cuthbert
Barbara Murdock Woods
Susan E. North
Janet Parmenter Ellinwood
Carolee Pedusey Virgilio
Carol Phalen Swiggett
Elaine Richardson Lefebvre
Donna Schmitt Gormley
Margaret Schwingel Kraft
Beverly Yaghjian Arabian

Contributors

Nancy Ahlgren Tewes
Alicia Albright Leach
Mary Augur Wallace
Ann August Marcus
Judith Berger Hurwitz
Louise Bernson Neiterman
Janet Berry Auletta
Elaine Bertini Roske
Joan Bloch Hulihan
Beverly Breed Hovey
Judy Caswell Allen
Marjorie Cavallo Olson
Sarah Churchill Downes
Joan Conley Eid
Dionisia Constantine Athans
Eleanor Cranston Hileman
Joan Daniels Reiser
Hanna Den Hartog Abrahams
Janice Engstrom Barbato
Thelma Epstein Lapides
Deborah Farnum Varney
Dorothy Fayan Hammond
Carol Fitzpatrick Harrell
Martha Forristall Smith
Gail Frank Wells
Gail Gelinas Nixon
Ann Hastings Peterson
Patricia Hayes Schoeller
Ann Hekemian Krikovian
Joan Hoffman Wark
Patricia Holland Bird
Evelyn Holmsen Frank
Diane Keenan Partnoy
Suzanne Kellner Canfield
Terry Kilgore Mannix
Carol LeCompte Cuthbert
Judith Littlefield Clark
Patti Lockwood Blanchette
Patricia Luchka Butterworth
Kaye Mackler Aronson
Ann Marcus Karol
Joyce Maroni Gomes
Joan Morris Frank
Barbara Murdock Woods
Marion Nelson Holland
Frances Nettleton Konsella
Diana Neusner Shapiro
Susan E. North
Reyna Olderman Stein
Mary Panetta Thomas
Sheila Paquette Ward
Mary Parmakian Asadoorian
Janet Parmenter Ellinwood
Ann Pasquale Bassett
Alice Paugh Keefer
Angela Pennio Takessian



Carol Phalen Swiggett
Mary Porter Darroch
Sally Quicke Reiss
Sylvia Rafkin Hurwitz
Barbara Richman Elliot
Lorraine E. Saunders
Carolyn Scherer Butler
Frances Scott Simmons
Evelyn Shear Pinsof
Sandra Shelton Fitch
Amy Shuttleworth Jensen
Nancy Smith Marchese
Audrey Spawn Stockman
Phyllis Steckler Thomas
Patricia Strawbridge Mulhern
Katharine H. Taft
Suzanne Wadsworth Jonas
Bette Walsh Ollstein
Beverly Yaghjian Arabian
Ann Yetter Thomas

1957

Total contribution: $425.00

Contributors
Edith Berger Kaplan
Barbara Bean James
Mildred Berg Cunningham
Joan Bergevin Barron

x Susan R. Blake
Annette Bogdan Ferris
Sandra Bristol Walters
Marilyn Brown Stover
Virginia L. Bruce
Carol Crandall Stiles
Marjorie Day Grosjean
Dorothy Fenley Manning
Virginia Field Coburn
Barbara Flint Gerold
Norma Gamins Wise
Sue Garratt Wollard
Merle Goldman Jacobson
Sheiia Graham Foley
Muriel Hagerthy Meyer
Lorraine Hintlian Damerjian
Patricia Howe Bassett
Frances Howell Rodenhizer
Marcia James Carthaus
Marcia Jones Leighton
Louise Jorda Matarazzo
Suzanne Jouret Kowalski
Peggy Kenison Haraty
Caroline Killam Moller
Katherine Knowles Scully
Judith Komito Oster
Judith Leventhal Winer
Janet L. Lutringer
Audrey MacAdam Lowe
Sheiia Marcus Zucker
Ann Moulton Hastings
Sally Payne Perley
Marilyn Pearce Schreiber
Joyce Pendergast Maney
Carol Preater Feldman
Nancy J. Sommer
Barbara Sturges Kraus

x Jean Warren Tredwell
Margaret Zipf Metzler

1958

Total contribution: $538.50

Agents
Betty Anderson Fairchild
Constance Baker George
Audrey H. Biggerstaff
Jeanne Bradner Spackey
Susan Clary Delahunt
Ann L. Dunkel
Mary Ann Fuller Young
Elizabeth Hambro Burnes
Marion Heinsohn Mitchell
Janet Hicks McCoy
Nancy Moloney Coyle
Carole Paolino Pliakas



Brenda Pioppi Balboni
Ann Reeves Schmid
Sandra Shelter Lewis
Kim Steen Odle
Bette Stubbe Carcano
Elaine Tracey McCarthy
Starr Tupper Shannon
Susan VanHorn VanArsdale
Judith Watson Lewis
Gail Winalski Burd
Constance Wolcott Mason



Contributors

Marilyn Barette Roberts
Kathleen Barstow McLaurin
Carole Bartholomew Dusseau
Barbara Batty Brown
Audrey H. Biggerstaff
Andrea Bischoff Houser
Jeanne Bradner Spacksy
Linda Braslow Lefkowitz

x Barbara Brown Carlson
Cathleen L. Burns
Millicent Carlson O'Brien
Barbara Cummings Taylor
Peggy Fox Friedman
Mary Ann Fuller Young
Judith George Stephens
Susan Greenhut Kamras
Janet Hicks McCoy
Marian Hume Tibbetts
Joan Hyde Shapiro
Mary Landini Doyle
Mary Ann Loughman McDade
Helen Lundberg Carter
Nancy Moloney Coyle
Nan McAuliffe Clare
Janet McPherson Pretto
Barbara Montag Levy
Mary Murray Cass
Marion Oliver Sutherland
Myra E. Packer
Carole Paolino Pliakas
Carol Ann Perrorti

x Sue Patack Levine
Joan Plaskon Tatigian
Susan Rapaport Paul

x Beverlee Raymond Henion
Ann Reeves Schmid
Joan Seufert Callahan
Elaine Shanken Fischer
Barbara Stannard Eddy
Kim Steen Odle
Joyce Stirling Wyatt
Barbara Swedlin Ginsburg
Kate Tobin Yelle
Starr Tupper Shannon
Susan VanHorn VanArsdale
Barbara Wenzel Carroll
Constance Wolcott Mason
Jean Wynott Delahunt

1959

Total contribution: $497.50

Chairmen
Joan Conradi McLaughlin
Nancy Rotman Duffy

Agents
Sally Bridger Bridges
Jean Britton Siano
Sally Brockway Crawford
Frances Corthouts Downey
Karen Daniels Dorney
Kathryn Eckert Bodner
Holly Engel Boyer
Nancy Gotz Cohn
Marjorie Borromey Lippert
Jane Dwyer Carr
Suzanne Paige Cook
Claire Salamanis Lyons
Melisse Jenkins Bailey
Sandra Poole Adams
Janet Roy Procino



Mary-Ann Stackpole Johnson
Priscilla Wakeling Patton
Carolyn Wood Brox



Contributors
Sondra Allen
Judith Barnstead Francis
Sandra Barton Fairchild
Marilyn Beaton Lange
Sandra Bender Oresman
Marjorie Borromey Lippert
Susan Bravman Uretsky
Sally Bridger Bridges
Sally Brockway Crawford
Cynthia Brossman Ancona
Barbara Case Lipke
Carol Civetti Monaghan
Carole Cohen Wexler
Joan Conradi McLaughlin
Frances Corthouts Downey
Nancy Crowell Coleman
Joanne Curtis island
Eileen Dahl Lord
Faye Davis O'Brien
Ann Douglass Wood
Nancy Ferguson Chapman
Elsa Finard Waxman
Nancy Gotz Cohn
Donna Grover Holland
Joanne Gullo Gormley
Anne Hayden Halberg

x Patricia Hayes Bailey
Susan Hearne Southwich
Melisse Jenkins Bailey
Sandra Kenney Granese
Linda Kitch Forand
Dorothy Knobel Somogyi
Brenda McLafferty Manchester
Katherine Moore Edmands

x Helen Moran Crooks
Elaine Napoli Duncan
Anna Natsis
Louise Ohanesian Shaheen

x Kathryn Peel Ferguson
Judith Rakosky Baskin
Marcia Rideout Stevens
Suzanne Saunders Doyle
Barbara Skolnick Blume
Janet Smith

Harriet Stallings Jarosh
Diane Strawhince Butler
Joan Sycle Norwitz
Mary Teegardin Magee
Ann Telfer Considine
Joan Valentine Glasson
Nancy Wilder Schmidt
Priscilla Williams Espenhain
Carolyn Wood Brox

1960

Total contribution: $731.50

Chairmen
Audrey Bergesen Long
Linda Telfer
Linda Chiaramonte Mount

Agents
Maury Chenoweth Denniston
Diane Frankel Shulkin
Marsha Frommer Crowley
Susan Gage Barros
Martha Goodwin
Lynda Green Scourtis
Valerie Rothman Cenit
Ellen Smith
Phyliss Stone Blotner
Claire Sullivan Scatterday
K. Louise Thomson Mitchell
Joan M. White
Susan York Stadtfeld
Ronna Zucker Uhrman
Lucinda Hodskins Lindgren
Muriel Kershaw Shaw
Gwenda J. Love



Carol Mackay Beams
Mary K. McCartney
Carolyn Ramage Chalmers

Contributors

Barbara Ainsworth Owens

Elizabeth Backus Girard

Ina Berkowitz Karlins

Elizabeth Bigelow George

Faith E. Bowker

Charlotte H. Brown

Marlene Caton Russell

Maury Chenoweth Denniston

Jane Chevers Putnam

Linda Chiaramonte Mount

Joan Corthouts Grayson

Marcia Dodson Morley

Judith Edmonson Spetnagel

Carol Farquhar Hosking

Frances Fleming Kennedy

Lynn Flusser Tull

Diane Frankel Shulkin

Katherine A. Fritz

Minna Golden Levin

Susan Gage Barros

Patricia Grodsky Caplan

Lucinda Hodskins Lindgren
x Carol Israel Allen

Baila Issokson Janock

Susan Jarow Davis

Muriel Kershaw Shaw

Karen Kirk Ross

Jeanne Klebes Spargo

Colleen K. Light

Susan Louis Haffenreffer

Gwenda J. Love

Sandra Lund Grouten

Nancy D. Maas

Jane McCall Carothers

Sandra Olson Relyea

Anita Orleck Webber
x Barbara Orr Patterson

Linda Ostrom Goodwin

Linda Patterson Huff

Michele Poirier Gorman

Jane Race Sawyer

Valerie Rothman Cenit

Emily Ruane Hall

Mary Jane Sauer Lockard

Marilyn Senior Legg

Constance Siben Rudner

Ellen C. Smith

Suzanne Spangenberg Straley

Phyllis Stone Blotner

Linda Telfer

K. Louise Thomson Mitchell

Susan VanDorn Pease

Abby L. Wells

Joyce Wheeler Gardner

Joan M. White

Martha Yerkes Eustis

Ronna Zucker Uhrman

1961

Total contribution: $722.00

Chairmen

Joan Brodalski DuBois
Ann Davidson
Jeannette M. Zglenicki

Agents
Carolyn Bird Murray
Charlotte Clinton Clark
Alexandra Engelhardt Tomes
Mary George Poor
Natalie Granchelli Towle
Laura T. Jensen
Marilyn Melick Green
Jane Kendrigan Dzien
Maryellen King Hardy
Sheila Komito Levine
Carole Lamson Burpee
Mary C. Lucas
Phyllis Milano Coliano
Sandra Mueller Sandberg



Susan Natapow DeBlase
Virginia A. Orsi
Pauline Sarrazin Addison
Elizabeth Schwingel Sullivan
Nan Sparks Hunter
Eileen F. Stack
Nancy Thomas Dudek
Lillian A. Ward
Susan White Ashe
x Jeanne Wickenden Lake
Jane Wilson Pape

Contributors

Brenda Alperin Summer
Marilyn Ashlock Pinzino
Wilma Baird Schwarzkopf
Judith Bantleon Lawrence
Georgia Beaumont Kettelle
Patricia Benedict Colyer
Carolyn Bird Murray
Joan Brodalski DuBois
Carol Brooke Dreier
Barbara A. Brown
Elaine Butler Ryan
Diane Cassata Pillman
Charlotte Clinton Clark
Barbara Cole French
Noel Craig Andrus
Ann Davidson
Jan DeMartin Linfoot
Margaret Dickson Roberts
Valerie Duval Pettinicchi
Janet Edwards Tracy
Patricia Ellis Raezer
Linda Fait York
Joan Franke Neustaedter
Dianne Freeston Barlow
Mary George Poor
Mildred Gil lis Pereira
Diane Hartnett Hawkes
Carol Healy Butterworth
Elizabeth Hood Russian
Elizabeth Howard Crosbie
Laura T. Jensen
Jane Kendrigan Dzien
Patricia L. Kiefer
Carole Lamson Burpee

x Judith LeBaron Brewer
Celeste Mayo Shannon
Susan Metz Good
Phyllis Milano Coliano
Joan Moeller Thompson
Sandra Mueller Sandberg
Susan Natapow DeBlase
Melinda Neal Daniels
Valerie Orcutt Sirignano
Virginia A. Orsi
Jane Parsons Dolbier
Nancy Pickett Harrison
Constance Pihl Pritchard
Ann Porcaro Mucera
Sara Roberts Faherty
Rona Ruderman Goldstein
Elizabeth Schwingel Sullivan
Cynthia Smith
Ellen Smith Burton
Nan Sparks Hunter
Eileen F. Stack
Barbara Stark MacKenzie
Marguerite Stockman Tierney
Donna Szarek Sullivan

x Linda Vidmark Bagley
Gail Warren Barry
Geraldine Weidman Wight
Lynnda Westendorf Schofield
Susan White Ashe

x Jeanne Wickenden Lake

x Susan Wilbur Anderson
Jane Wilson Pape
Wendy Wolfenden
Virginia Wollinger Fisher
Jeannette M. Zglenicki

1962

Total contribution: $462.00



6^



Chairmen

Betsy MacMillan Blackledge
Andrea Zaletta Giovanniello

Agenfs

Susan Brooks Weiner
Linda Burnett Davis
Constance Ferolito Murray
Judith Fontaine Guenet
Beryl Hamlen Morrisey
Barbara Jillson Keif
llona Koch Hollar
E. Gwen Lincoln Colley
Marcia A. Madden
Roberta McKinley Machalek
Virginia McKinnon Dernavich
Patricia McNulty Magnotta
Betsey Mercer Henderson
Doris Orben Campbell
Carla Perkell Slomin
Randi Shapiro Cohen
Linda Strecker Harmon
Francine Cohn Jaffe
Virginia E. Fletcher
Prisciila Lane Jarman
Nance Magill Karp
Carol Miller Pekrul
Jasmin Mueller Gentling
Karen Reade Hewes
Sally Remley Southmayd
Arlene M. Royko
Linda Shaghalian Penniman
Karen Smith Grover
Elaine Sproul Belham
Prisciila White Givan

Contributors

Elaine M. Abodeely
Sandra Arnold Repasky
Linda Ann Bald
June Bishop Engman
Miriam Bloom Chaiklin
Muriel Bloom Bruskin
Lynda Blount Nickelsen
Jeanne Boyd Austin
Anne W. Brookhart
Susan Brooks Weiner
Marybeth Brossman Mortimer
Linda Burnett Davis
Patricia A. Buxton
Barbara Cagle Rojecki
Pamela Capuano Veek
Sharon Carley Fitts
Janet M. Cotton
Sara W. Daigneau
Susan DeLuca Federico
Barbara Fitzgerald Edson
Alexandra Foundas Connors
Patricia Gath Yates
June Golden Gosule
Nancy Haines Kennedy
Beryl Hamlen Morrisey
Joan Killian Wronsky
Anne M. Klimt
llona Koch Hollar
x Elizabeth Lane Tietgen
Betsy MacMillan Blackledge
Marcia A. Madden
Nance Magill Karp
Karen Mandel Marschall
Betsey Mercer Henderson
Carol Miller Glassman
Judith Moss Feingold
Diane Napoli Hall
Doris Orben Campbell
Linda Resnick Freedman
Joan Sastavickas Curtin
Randi Shapiro Cohen
Christine Shier Shaw
Karen Smith Grover
Nancy Sporborg Keck
Elaine Sproul Belham
Linda Strecker Harmon
Janice Toran Stucki
Ann-Perley Wingersky Ireland
Judith Wright Levins
Susan Young Boynton



1963

Total contribution: $317.00

Chairman
Linda Norris Taylor

Agents
Charlotte Brown Whitehead
Karen Crafts Rodgers
Carol Cummings Steinberger
Barbara J. Moulton
Bonnie Storer Ouellette
Marcia Wightman Sansoucy
Diana Wilson Shepard
Susan Woodruff Bieling

Contributors

Brenda Altman Berman

Dorothy Andler Silber

Deborah Begg McKinney

Cornelia Bessemer Hatfield

Jeanne Chase Peckham

Chris Christiansen Schwartz

Bette Cole Burnham

Joan Cox McKechnie

Carol Cummings Steinberger

Sandra Damigella Nelson

Lorraine Duffy Hackett

Ruth Dunn Souza

Karen Fox Evans

Barbara Freer Urquhart

Gail Grange Johnson

Sarah Hirst Zvonkovic

Arlene A. Jacopian

Marian Kerstein

Dean Knobel Lindsay
x Claire Lipton Katz

Betty Lutz Stahlbrodt

Susan March Allen
x Paula McPherson O'Sullivan

Loel Mercer Poor

Barbara J. Moulton

Marjorie Myles Miller

Susan Nanry Ferriman

Linda Norris Taylor

Marsha Perlmutter Flaster

Cathryn Reynolds Simpson

Miriam Robbins Kelly

Patricia Ryan Cantin (Faculty)

Harriet Shapiro Nirenstein

Karin Skooglund

Sylvia Starr Irwin

Bonnie Storer Ouellette
x Amy S. Ullman

Diana Wilson Shepard

1964

Total contribution: $432.00

Agents

Mary McAtee Barnes

Claire Monahan Knapp

Linda N. Parmenter

Janet Ramsbotham Hurt

Virginia A. Schmidt

Helene J. Smith

Patricia Washburn Mancivalano

Donna S. Whiteley

Contributors

Judith Adelson Wein
Joyce Arkwright Fliedner
Vivien Ash Hayden
Lees Beckwith Ferguson
Marion Bishop Kersh
Carol Bradley Sullivan
Carol Ann Brown
Lynn Brown Kargman
Cheryl M. Campbell
Susan Childs Merrick
Julie Clark Doescher
Sue Ellen Eckstrom
Margery Ann Flowers



Carolyn Fogg Yaekel
Susan Gordon Savitz
Susan B. Gorfinkle
Nancy Guttman Metcalf
Anne Harvey Lawton
Kathleen Hayes Panos
Susan Humphreys Klein
Marsha Keyes Tucker
Nancy J. Lonergan
Marcia A. MacTavish
Karen Metcalf Sommer
Bonnie Milne Drewes
Sara-Jane Osborne
Linda M. Parmenter
Jane Pearson Kurz
Patricia Perry Polidor
Linda Peterssen Werner
Bonnie Phelps Retkevicz
Patricia Pugliese Streibel
Phyllis Rhyno Heslet
Lynn Rosenbush Davidov
Janet Rosenfeld MacLeod
Linda Shafer Polevoy
Jan Slocum Shipe
Ann J. Stern
Robin Strauss Shapiro
Edith S. Swift
Francia Vishno Blitt
Linda J. Werner
Donna S. Whiteley
Judith A. Zaritt

1965

Total contribution: $424.00

Chairmen

Nancy Currier
Linda Foster Nixon
Marjorie Story Brown

Agents
Sally Beaven Garfall
Laurel Brown Bickell
Paula Burstein Bilow
Susan Calder LaMarine
Helen J. Cassam
Sonia L. Gould
Dorothy Hodgson Rea
Susan K. Layng
Cynthia Ames Rutan
Karen Beaton Porter
JoAnn Benoit Thomas
Susan B. Dangel
Ann DeArment Naples
Deborah DeStaebler MacGowan
Danna D. Donnelly
Elizabeth J. Garfield
Elizabeth L. Gillette
Mary Ann Griffin Lally
Robin Paulding Chisholm
Beverlee Pembroke Hill
Janet Perkins Thompson
Mary Sprague Kirk
Gay A. Urban
Joan L. Vaidulas
Susan Williams Shanbar
Susan M. Warnick
Linda Wilson Bonfiglio
Judith A. Winters

Contributors

Elisse Allinson Share
Cynthia Ames Rutan
Sally Beaven Garfall
Susan M. Blount
Joan C. Brignano
Nancy K. Burrough
Helen J. Cassam
x Mary Clapp Searle
Marie S. Coven
Nancy L. Currier
Anne DeArment Naples
Linda Foster Nixon
Linda Garber Cohen
Lee Gissler Andera



Emily Gottfried Levine
Kathleen Goulder Plante
Julie Gurka Kubaska
Katherine Healey Marella
Jean Hill Johnson
Gail Jacobsen
Suzanne Johnson Nicolazzo
Donna Kane Audibert
Patricia Ann Kettle
Roberta Krasnow Wallach
Susan K. Layng
Bonnie Margolin Faiman
Ann M. Mattioli

x Elloise Mayo Packer
Susan Meyer Datz
Dorothy Miller Leary

x Lydia E. Moisides
Janet W. Muir
Joanne O'Brien Ricciardi
Robin Paulding Chisholm
Karen J. Pedersen
Virginia Pedrick Searle
Louise Schwartz Rose
Dorothy Searles Woods
Elizabeth J. Silliman
Mary Sprague Kirk
Elinor Stone Ross
Marjorie Story Brown
Gay A. Urban
Helene Viener
Lynn Wemple Cooley
Susan Yenkin Leffler



1966

Total contribution: $461.00

Chairmen
Susan E. Ellis
Linda L. Ferris
Gail Williamson

Agenfs
Alice E. Reeves
Nancy L. Reeves
Susan G. Ruby
Anne C. Smith
Susan Stuurman
Virginia Wolf
Nancy L. Andrews
Arlyn Baker
Linda Beardslee
Margherita C. Guillaro
Marsha L. Howe
Mary Lloyd Zaragoza
Elinore E. Lowe
Nancy T. Olson Lamparelli
Susan Callis Terrio
Ann Canedy Parisien
Penny Colpitts Warren

Contributors
Joy Abercrombie Dooley
Anne Ames Heimbach
Laura Arcari Amara
Linda Beardslee
Lisa Benson Pickett
Nancy B. Black
Susan J. Bratenas
Karen Brown Ferris (Adm.)
Ann Canedy Parisien
Barbara Carol MacLean
Cynthia Cattanach Harding
Rhanna Choklad Ascherman
Penny Colpitts Warren
J. Lynn Craig Raleigh
Nan Eisenstein Speller
Marie Ellis Villiger
Joan Erkkila Fayne
Linda J. Fagan
Ann Fiander Dugan
Deborah P. Fineberg
Joanne J. Frankel
Diane Gelfond Stellar
Anne Goodale Mack
Nancy L. Goodale
Carolyn Graham Guardia



Margherita C. Guillaro

Susan Higgiston Viault

Constance L. Hill

Marsha L. Howe

Patricia A. Lamarre

Mildred A. Levy

Ann B. Louden

Elinore Lowe

Gail Maclean Cabral

Linda Mars Lindstrand

Virginia L. Martin

Nancy Olson Lamparelli

Nancy Lee Palmer

Alice E. Reeves

Nancy L. Reeves

Elizabeth Reitman Lowenstein

Virginia Anne Riedell

Sue Roberts Augeri

Roberta Rogers Shore

Peggy Rowell Cutts

Lorraine C. Saltz

Lois Sawyer

Kathleen Shed Claflin

Martha Sweetser Wright

Nancy P. Tollman

Pamela Terrell Martin

Sherry Volovick Missan

Susan Wakeman Meier

Marion Wheeler Kimball

Gail Williamson

Carol Wolfenden Joder



1967

Total contribution: $325.00



Contributors

Nancy L. Allen
Jane Angelilli Yarbrough
Beth Anderson
Nancy J. Begg
Pamela Bunting
Deborah M. Burgess
Olga Cabrer King
Karen K. Corlett
Barbara Coughlin IlifT
Deborah Dunn Paddock
Pamela J. Fenhagen
Candia J. Fisher
Susan Halewood Crosby
Carole J. Howe
Denise Koules Katsaros
Barbara L. Kurtin



Susan F. Lillywhite
Suzanne Marek Boehm
Joan Matz Goldberg
Katherine A. McDonough
Janet C. McGuckian
Kathryn J. Morgan
M. Diane Olson
Janice N. Reynolds
Rose A. Rosen
Cynthia V. Rudokas
Judith Shea Borek
Sandra Shepard
x Jane Sherwin Greenslit
Barbara E. Stern
Susan L. Swanson
Susan C. Swienckowski
Victoria W. Tenney
Carol VanRavensway Day
Anne Winslow Carlson
Kathleen M. Wright

1968

Total contribution: $120.00

Contributors
Elizabeth A. Ensor
Nadine Hertz
Edith M. Hogsett
Andrea London
Ellen C. Margolis
Carol R. Masius
Sonja McCord Folds
Julie R. Monsky
Edith B. Mossberg
Roberta M. Munce
LePage Robbins
Judy A. Schaubert
Carol L. Spindler
Ann F. Sterner
Laura L. Struckoff
Janice M. Taylor
Anne Torrance Wirth
Elizabeth A. Wissman



Woodland Park

and

High School

Total contribution: $66.50



Contributors
Anonymous



Alyce Conary Collins
Eloise Lane Rideout
Shirley Marks Tuck
Jean E. Peace
Doris Wilson Lehners

Lite Members
Katharine M. Anthony
Bertha McNerny St. Amand

Club Gifts

Total contribution: $275.00

Chicago

Philadelphia-South Jersey
Rhode Island
Worcester

Matching Gifts

Total Contribution: $1330.00

Aetna Life Affiliated Companies
Air Reduction Company

Incorporated
American Can Company
Associated Spring Corporation
Chase Manhattan Bank

Foundation
Continental Can Company
Eighty Maiden Lane Foundation
Esso Education Foundation
Ford Motor Company Fund
General Electric Foundation
General Foods Fund Incorporated
John Hancock Insurance Company
Hartford Insurance Group

Foundation Incorporated
IBM Corporation
Krando Foundation
New England Mutual Life

Insurance Company
Northeast Utilities Service

Company
Norton Company
Polaroid Corporation
Putnam Management Company

Incorporated
Riegel Textile Corporation

Foundation
Rockefeller Family and Associates
Science Research Associates

Incorporated



Smith-Corona-Marchant

Corporation
Tenneco Foundation Incorporated
Time Incorporated
Travelers Insurance Company
Xerox

Trustees
Faculty and Administration

Total contribution: $2495.00

Trustees

Bruce B. Bredehoft

Julia Crafts Sheridan '10

Robert W. Ficken

Marguerite Houser Hamlin '19

Helen B. Perry '24

Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker '22

Helen M. Saunders '17

Toni Meritt Smith '23

Wilder N. Smith

Louise Tardivel Higgins '37

Dr. & Mrs. Blake Tewksbury

Theresa Thompson Osborne '22

Dr. Donald J. Winslow

Richard A. Winslow

Faculty and Administration

Winslow H. Adams

Frances Atwood

Harriet W. Atwood

June Babcock

Dr. Charles E. Barry

Elaine Cavanaugh

Carolyn E. Chapman

Margaret W. French

Yolanda Goldman

Sylvia Goodman

Elise L. Jewett

Harriet S. Kahn

Vaino Kola

Ruth Lindquist Brinton

Dr. James S. Lohman

Ailce May

Muriel R. McClelland

Sebastian F. Mignosa

Barbara Parkhurst

Eleanor S. Perley

Lia Poorvu

Ruth Rothenberger Harris

Murial S. Sheppard

Fredece L. Stoodley

Ann W. Tagge

Dorothy E. Weston



FINAL REPORT OF ALUMNAE FUND
CONTRIBUTIONS 1968-69

(July 27, 1 968 — September 1 5, 1 969)

The following summary includes contributors and contributions received up to and including September 15, 1969.







Total








Total


Class


Contributors


Amount


Class


Confr/bufors


Amount


Classes to














1906


17


$ 518.00


1945




42


$ 442.50


1906


6


95.00


1946




35


455.00


1907


9


682.50*


1947




45


772.00


1908


4


195.00


1948




55


677.00


1909


5


65.00


1949




48


1496.00


1910


9


186.00


1950




61


1085.37


1911


3


70.00


1951




53


508.00


1912


13


250.00


1952




39


465.00


1913


6


112.00


1953




57


591.00


1914


18


378.00


1954




78


852.00


1915


16


363.00


1955




75


832.00


1916


33


831.00


1956




76


765.00


1917


15


522.00


1957




43


425.00


1918


12


645.00


1958




48


538.00


1919


17


297.00


1959




53


497.50


1920


15


260.00


1960




57


731.50


1921


17


1287.00


1961




69


722.00


1922


27


1635.00


1962




50


462.00


1923


17


438.00


1963




38


317.00


1924


17


576.00


1964




44


432.00


1925


23


461.00


1965




46


424.00


1926


18


355.00


1966




56


461.00


1927


22


462.00


1967




36


325.00


1928


22


410.00


1968




18


120.00


1929


44


997.00










1930


17


390.00


High School


&






1931


21


256.00


Woodland


Park






1932


24


309.00






6


66.50


1933


21


210.00










1934


19


370.00


Trustees, Fac


ulty






1935


25


500.00


& Administration


i




1936


26


483.00






37


2495.00


1937


38


953.00










1938


38


509.00


Club Gifts:




4


275.00


1939


31


599.00










1940


27


340.00


Matching Gifts






1941


42


653.00






(34)


1330.00


1942


44


644.00










1943


36


476.00


TOTAL


2108


$37,720.87


1944


25


375.00











* Includes one non-alumnae donor



Marriages



Frances Austin Ferris '37 and William J. Beaumier

on October 12, 1969 in Bedford, Mass.
Hope Daigneault '45 and Thomas H. Pezzullo on June 7,

1969 in Middlebury, Vt.
Rhoda Butler Polner '48 and Arthur L. Pinansky on

November 16, 1969 in Portland, Me.
Hanna DenHartog '56 and Dr. Lawrence M. Abrahams

on July 5, 1969 in Concord, Mass.
Lenore E. Hagopian '57 and Gregory H. Arabian on

May 31, 1969 in Boston, Mass.
Diane M. Dello Russo '59 and George V. Guida in

November 1969 in Medford, Mass.
Natalie L. Burdon x-'59 and Glenn C. DeVan on August

9, 1969 in Newington, Conn.
Sandra L. Kenney '59 and Andrew M. Granese on

October 25, 1969 in Concord, Mass.
Marcia D. Burns x-'60 and James P. Malmfeldt on June

28, 1969 in Haddonfield, N.J.

Nancy D. Maas '60 and Edward R. Bettinardi on

December 27, 1969 in New York
Leslie A. Newlin '61 and James J. Fitzpatrick, III on

August 23, 1969 in New York, N.Y.
Linda F. Vidmark x-'61 and Paul J. Bagley on September

6, 1969 in Fairfield, Conn.
Elaine M. Abodeely '62 and Najib E. Saliba on

November 30, 1969 in Worcester, Mass.
Anne W. Brookhart '62 and Robert E. Cady on November

29, 1969 in Boston, Mass.

Linda R. Cremonini '62 and Dennis E. Nessman on

October 12, 1969 in Wellesley, Mass.
Nanci Edelstein '62 and Calvin S. Kritzman in June 1969

in Ipswich, Mass.
Jean M. Caldwell '63 and Michael F. Morceau in July

1969 in Harvard, Mass.
Marcia L. Clancy '63 and Francis J. Dailey in November

1969 in Arlington, Mass.
Louise M. Freeman x-'63 and Nicholas Werthessen on

December 24, 1969 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Carol J. Colegrove '64 and Bruce A. Walker on

October 4, 1969 in Darien, Conn.
Nancie M. Devaux '64 and David M. Swift on October 18,

1969 in Glastonbury, Conn.
Anne C. Gaffney '64 and Thomas V. Moriarty, 2nd. on

November 30, 1969 in Tewksbury, Mass.
Gail Glynn '64 and Bruce W. Gordon on May 24, 1969 in

Needham, Mass.



Kathleen P. Hughes x-'64 and John D. Coleman in

October 1969 in Chestnut Hill, Mass.
Phyllis E. Rhyno '64 and Dennis L. Heslet on May 31,

1969 in Beverly, Mass.
Nancy E. Simard x-'64 and John J. Begley on August 9,

1969 in E. Longmeadow, Mass.
Nancy J. Smith '64 and David M. Birkett in October 1969

in Needham, Mass.
Rhoda E. Adelman '65 and Philip R. Moskowitz on

June 7, 1969 in Woodbridge, Conn.

Nancy B. Almgren '65 and Robert W. Killam on

November 22, 1969 in Enfield, Conn.
Susan J. Chambers '65 and James R. O'Leary in

August 1969 in Needham, Mass.
Donna L. Dolbier '65 and Kenneth Karl on May 10, 1969

in Westwood, N.J.
Melody French '65 and William Wilder in July 1969 in

Hopedale, Mass.
Lee P. Gissler '65 and Joseph F. Andera on October 25,

1969 in Reading, Mass.
Mary A. Griffin '65 and Donald H. Lally on July 12, 1969

in Lawrence, Mass.
Lila Halperin x-'65 and Delmont R. Stokes on February

17, 1969 in Honolulu, Hawaii
Dorothy P. Hodgson '65 and Richard H. Rea on July

19, 1969 in Easton, Conn.
Cynthia L. Hopkins '65 and Edward A. Tonello on

August 2, 1969 in Winchester, Mass.
Susan J. Lazarus '65 and Leonard I. Shapiro on August

3, 1969 in New York, N.Y.
Susan M. Lind '65 and Howard V. Hennigar, Jr. on

October 25, 1969 in Boston, Mass.
Kathleen M. Loughman '65 and Robert L. Foerster on

September 27, 1969 in Springfield, Mass.
Robin Paulding '65 and Bruce H. Chisholm on August

17, 1969 in Harwichport, Mass.
Carole A. Sybil x-'65 and Ralph S. Poirier in October

1969 in Medford, Mass.
Margaret K. Yonker '65 and J. Gregory MacKenzie on

June 28, 1969 in Fairfield, Conn.
Laura A. Arcari '66 and Lawrence J. Amara on October

11, 1969 in Plainville, Conn.
Janice F. Brett '66 and William J. Wilcox on June 14,

1969 in Wilton, Conn.
Derith A. Cing-Mars '66 and Gerald E. Fellows on

November 22, 1969 in North Attleboro. Mass.



Candice Conchar x-'66 and Michael St. George Joyce
on August 2, 1969 in Short Hills, N.J.

Katherine M. Conners '66 and Stuart A. B. Brinkley, USA

on July 26, 1969 in Higganum, Conn.
Janet Craig '66 and John P. Raleigh Jr. on August 30,

1969 in Massapequa, N.Y.
Carolyn E. Crayton '66 and Robert A. McVoy in August

1969 in Rochester, N.Y.
Susan Ellis '66 and Lt. Michael J. McLaughlin, Jr. USMC

on November 11, 1969 in Burlington, Mass.
Joan M. Erkkila '66 and Francis A. Fayne, Jr. in August

1969 in Centerville, Mass.
Judith A. Goodwin '66 and Harold W. Walker in

November 1969 in Waltham, Mass.

Donna Harris x-'66 and Stephen A. Bassett in June 1969

in Brookline, Mass.
Judith W. Hilgert x-'66 and Gary W. Macintyre on

August 23, 1969 in New Canaan, Conn.
Laura Lappin '66 and Joseph E. Gallagher, Jr. on July

4, 1969 in Newton, Mass.

Susan Legare '66 and Leonard E. Peterson on December

27, 1969 in Clifton, N.J.
Emily N. Manning '66 and David H. Monbleau in August

1969 in Waltham, Mass.
Kathleen N. Moshure '66 and James M. Johnson on

August 9, 1969 in Seattle, Wash.
Martha M. Murphy '66 and Thomas C. Polletta in June

1969 in Wellesley, Mass.
Charlotte A. Okula '66 and David M. Baker on December

13, in Greenfield, Mass.
Nancy T. Olson '66 and Raymond Lamparelli on August

30, 1969 in Stamford, Conn.
Arlene Paratore '66 and Warren R. Avery in November

1969 in Lexington, Mass.
Nancy L. Reeves '66 and Dr. Gary R. Peterson on

December 13, 1969 in Akron, Ohio

Lois Sawyer '66 and Patrick Caulfield on January 1, 1970
in Peterborough, N.H.

Sandra J. Shadle '66 and Newman M. Marsilius, III on
January 3, 1970 in Trumbull, Conn.

Harriet S. Siegal '66 and Andrew C. Stich on July 13,
1969 in Cambridge, Mass.

Elaine H. Vanderman '66 and Leslie A. Waltman on

October 12, 1969 in Waterbury, Conn.
Donna-Lee Wyman '66 and Jerry O'Driscoll in December
1969 in Somersworth, N.H.

Joy E. Austin x-'67 and Roger P. Wynn in April 1969 at
Barbers Point Naval Air Station Chapel in Hawaii

Linda J. Birenbaum '67 and Michael Ellison in

September 1969 in Brookline, Mass.
Nancy Carlson '67 and Alan J. Doak on July 5, 1969

in Fairfield, Conn.

Carolyn Cunningham '67 and Lee A. Nell on July 12,
1969 in So. Dartmouth, Mass.



Norey Dotterer '67 and Thomas D. Cullen on September

20, 1969 in Newport, R.I.

Gail J. Edwards '67 and Fitz-Randolph Marston, Jr. on
December 28, 1969 in New Canaan, Conn.

Katherine D. Finnegan '67 and Daniel J. Steele, USA on
September 27, 1969 in Wellesley, Mass.

Joanne Friedman x-'67 and Robert Asekoff in June 1969
in New Bedford, Mass.

Leslie Gaynes '67 and Richard Gelfond on December

21, 1969 in Millburn, N.J.

Margaret A. Gilmour '67 and Edward Blackmer on

August 30, 1969 in Baldwin, N.Y.
Myra N. Goldstein x-'67 and Gerald Feldman on June

22, 1969 in Swampscott, Mass.

Gail E. Grinnell '67 and Frank F. Frongillo on May 31,

1969 in Winchester, Mass.
Jane I. Hentz '67 and Jaffrey P. Mocarsky in June 1969

in Hingham, Mass.
Heather A. Hines '67 and Ronald H. Peterson on August

16, 1969 in Gardner, Mass.

Cynthia C. Knowles '67 and Jeffrey H. Eaton in August

1969 in Weston, Mass.
Denise S. Koules '67 and Arthur T. Katsaros in October

1969 in Watertown, Mass.
Gail H. Macey '67 and Robert H. Krasnow in December

1969 in Chestnut Hill, Mass.
Jean E. Marcus '67 and Abraham J. Peck on June 21,

1969 in Portland, Me.
Elizabeth A. Marsh '67 and Michael E. Hanson on

December 19, 1969 in Worcester, Mass.
Kathryn J. Morgan '67 and Frederick R. Lucey in

November 1969 in West Newton, Mass.
Nancy J. Nass x-'67 and Ralph L. Elias, Jr. on

September 25, 1969 in New York, N.Y.
Cynthia A. Nowak '67 and Thomas L. Cardellichio on

June 15, 1969 in Framingham, Mass.
Patricia L. Rhett '67 and William P. Keating on January

17, 1970 in Stamford, Conn.

Kathleen M. Ryan '67 and Charles C. Cooper on August

30, 1969 in Mountain Lakes, N.J.
Miriam Shurkin x-'67 and Sanford A. Schwartz on

June 3, 1969 in Millburn, N.J.
Renee L. Silverman x-'67 and Sanders M. Chattman on

June 14, 1969 in Short Hills, N.J.
Barbara Stern '67 and Edward M. Fishman on June 29,

1969 in Houston, Texas
Susan E. Stultz '67 and David A. Littlefield on August

16, 1969 in Chestnut Hill, Mass.
Fay E. White '67 and E. Browning LaBrecque on August

24, 1969 in Ludlow, Mass.
Linda K. Bamberger '68 and Harvey M. Kirsch on

September 1, 1969 in Springfield, N.J.
Cynthia J. Belka '68 and David A. Crowley in August

1969 in Manchester, N.H.
Martha S. Borawski '68 and Eric B. Gervais on June 14,

1969 in Florence, Mass.



Joan M. Caputo '68 and Kevin C. Sweeney on June 21,
1969 in Arlington, Mass.

Linda S. Cohen '68 and Jeffrey H. Newman on
September 1, 1969 in Long Beach, N.Y.

Joan DeCecco '68 and Kenneth F. Heald on October 25,
1969 in Hartsdale, N.Y.

Susan F. Flagg '68 and Stephen C. Finn on June 7,

1969 in Longmeadow, Mass.
Olivia A. Haskin '68 and Thomas J. Hitchcock on June 7,

1969 in Newport, Vt.
Katherine A. Hutton '68 and Craig Kennedy in August

1969 in Belmont, Mass.

Leona D. Johnson '68 and Ronald H. Johnson on June

14, 1969 in Shrewsbury, Mass.
Beverly M. Johnston '68 and Lt. Kenneth Jenkins, USN

on November 1, 1969 in Melrose Highlands, Mass.
Kathleen R. Kane x-'68 and John B. Kemp, III on

September 20, 1969 in Saddle River, N.J.
Bonnie H. Lord '68 and Paul D. McNeil in October 1969

in Peabody, Mass.

Rosa L. Lugris '68 and Henry L. Reznik on June 7, 1969

in Shelton, Conn.
Frances E. Madigan '68 and Charles W. Cramb, Jr. in

September 1969 in Groton, Mass.

Ellen V. Mahon '68 and Michael J. Leary in August 1969

in Rockland, Mass.
Judith McCall '68 and Richard G. Cutts on July 19, 1969

in Woburn, Mass.

Sonja R. McCord '68 and John E. Folds on August 9,

1969 in Washington, D.C.
Mary L. Millard '68 and Kenney W. Aldrich on June 7,

1969 in Springfield, Vt.
Margery E. Minor '68 and Robert A. Willetts on

September 6, 1969 in Meriden, Conn.
Joan M. Murphy '68 and Alan L. Stuart on May 31, 1969

in Natick, Mass.
Penny Newman '68 and Arthur D. Gold in January 1970

in Weston, Mass.
Mary V. Piemonte '68 and John W. Saladino in August

1969 in Boston, Mass.

Cynthia G. Rardin '68 and Richard H. Crawford in
August 1969 in Needham, Mass.

Kathleen Richter '68 and Robert J. Cockfield on
December 27, 1969 in Stratford, Conn.

Carol H. Smith '68 and Francis A. Lucenta on July 12,
1969 in Norwich, Conn.

Marlene C. Starvish '68 and Brian Friary on June 21,

1969 in Taunton, Mass.
Janice Stern '68 and Jeffrey Schlossberg on September

6, 1969 in Manomet, Mass.
Janice A. Sweeney '68 and Mark Olson in January 1970

in Westwood, Mass.
Judith L. Arnold '69 and Robert J. Schmonsees on

December 20, 1969 in River Ridge, N.J.



Christine Battaglia x-'69 and Russell W. French in
January 1970 in Wellesley, Mass.

Susan M. Baumhart x-'69 and William B. Muggleston, Jr.

on December 20, 1969 in North Salem, N.Y.
Nancy I. Bullen '69 and Joseph M. Latvis on June 21,

1969 in Rochester, N.Y.

Terrell E. Burke x-'69 and Warren Strassel on August
15, 1969 in Hanover, Mass.

Joanne E. Carignan '69 and Mark H. Davis on July 12,

1969 in So. Meriden, Conn.
Kristine S. Childs '69 and Roger G. Spear on December

6, 1969 in Farmington, Me.
Judith Clark x-'69 and Jeffrey H. Gowing on November

1, 1969 in North Beverly, Mass.

Valerie Cloud '69 and James A. Goode on September

6, 1969 in Osterville, Mass.
Betsy A. Cohen '69 and Martin P. Solomon on June 29,

1969 in Chestnut Hill, Mass.

Susan A. Ferrick '69 and James M. Barton, III on
October 10, 1969 in Newton Upper Falls, Mass.

Betsy S. Gimbel '69 and Arthur L. Ratner on July 1, 1969

in Woodbridge, Conn.
Susan B. Henrickson '69 and Kevin Scott Frary on

August 23, 1969 in Swampscott, Mass.
Susan Luther '69 and Joel Cohen on June 22, 1969 in

Glastonbury, Conn.
Karen G. Mann '69 and Stephen J. Kepnes on October

12, 1969 in West Hartford, Conn.

Cynthia A. Marabello '69 and John K. Donelan on

June 21, 1969 in Littleton, Mass.
Sheila A. Murdock '69 and Peter T. Ross on August 30,

1969 in Peapack, N.J.
Judith R. O'Donnell '69 and Dennis M. Libby on

on November 29, 1969 in Weymouth, Mass.
Judith B. Railsback '69 and Sgt. Thomas F. Finn, Jr.

USAF in July 1969 in Wellesley Hills, Mass.
Pamela Rand '69 and John M. Andrus on June 21, 1969

in Hanover, N.H.
Claudia Rene '69 and Dennis M. Korrot on December

13, 1969 in New Jersey

Leslie B. Rooks '69 and Peter B. Sack in December

1969 in Swampscott, Mass.
Dale C. Roser x-'69 and Robert J. Graf on December 14,

1969 in Ashbury Park, N.J.
Sharon Seward '69 and 2nd. Lt. Francis J. McHugh, Jr.

USAF on November 29, 1969 in West Barrington, R.I.
Janet F. Thomas '69 and James D. Riddell on July 19,

1969 in Colorado
Mary E. Ward '69 and John M. Lucci on July 26, 1969

in Wilton, Conn.
Deborah Wheeler '69 and Joseph N. Logan on August 9,

1969 in Stratford, Conn.
Nancy A. Yetter '69 and Lt. William C. Conant, II,

U.S. Army on July 26, 1969 in Greenfield, Mass.



19



Class Notes



'99

Mabel Marston is comfortably lo-
cated at Brentwood Manor in Yar-
mouth, Maine. On November 21st she
celebrated her 91st birthday; enjoyed
a "day after" visit with Gertrude
Hooper Ring '32, Miss Muriel McClel-
land and Marge MacClymon '32.



'07

Carrie Sessions Dodge informs us
of the death of Helen Andrus Benedict
x-'07 in Yonkers, N.Y.



'15

Items from the Class Letter, re-
ceived in November:

Irene Ball Sill: busy with grand-
children and two great-grandchildren.
We are glad to hear that Irene's sight
is much improved.

Elizabeth Beach Bierer: daughter
and husband were delegates to a 1969
conference in South America. They
are looking forward to a similar meet-
ing in Turkey.

Martha Schumann Laubenstein: dis-
covered several Lasell alumnae
among the guests at a granddaugh-
ter's wedding.

Ada Patterson: health prevents her
usual "travelling" vacations.

Florence Evans Valpey: regretted
that she and her husband were not
able to see Clara Paton Suhlke when
they were in Florida last winter.

Margrethe Bauman: delighted that
sister Helen (Bauman '17) Roblin and
husband are now neighbors in Gray-
ling, Mich. Peg also mentioned a
recent note from Edna Christiansen
Beckwith x-'16.

Catherine Carter Rasbach: happy
in St. Louis and wrote a most amusing
account of a busy trip to attend the
Mississippi River Music Festival.

Myrtle Brix Spangler: enjoying the
"high views" from her penthouse
apartment (complete with small gar-
den) in Portland, Ore.

Katherine Hoag Norgren: keeping
busy in Mill Valley, Calif. Her husband,




1907's "Inseparables": Fern Dixon Leahy, Shirley Castetter Donaldson,
the late Helen Andrus Benedict, Martha Dale Loomis and Marceline

Freeman Jones.



now seventy-eight, plays tennis every
day. Their daughter and family are in
San Francisco, just across the Bay.

Nell Woodward Collins: with Jose-
phine Woodward Rand '10, enjoyed
a visit with their sister, Jean Wood-
ward Nelson '22, who came east from
Denver. Drove to Auburndale from
Jo's home in Brookline — all so very
impressed with Lasell's campus.

Vilette Peck Crawshaw: her note
closed with this, one of her most re-
cent poems, "Trust, Do Not Fear":

We only live one day at a time —
The past is memory, the future a
dream.

Things are seldom as bad as they

seem,

So trust, do not fear.

Yes, God's love ordains that we shall
live

But one day at a time
He does not make the hills too hard
for us to climb

When discouraged or weary as

problems appear —

Just trust, do not fear.

Take each day as it comes along
Fill your heart each morning with
a song

Be assured that God is always near,
So trust, do not fear.

As we make the journey or today
And feel His presence all the way,

The message comes both loud and

clear:
Trust, do not fear.

. . . N.W.C.



'18



Mrs. Frank A. Nichols, mother of
Lois Nichols Arnold, celebrated her
100th birthday on October 4, 1969.
Lois and her sister were hostesses at
an open-house in Mrs. Nichol's honor.

Friends who were unable to at-
tend were invited to drink an "anni-
versary cup of tea" during the time of
the open-house in celebration of the
event.

Mrs. Nichols began a new pastime,
rug hooking, at the age of 90 and has
since completed 27 rugs. Her latest
project was a chair seat which was
hooked as a wedding gift for her great
granddaughter, Mrs. Kristin Arnold
Miller, who was married in Henniker
(N.H.) this summer.

'21

Lillian Doane Maddigan has just re-
turned from a visit to her newest
grandson, Aruthur G. Maddigan, Jr., in
Honolulu. Before leaving for Hawaii,
Lillian spent several days in California
as the guest of Pinky Puckett Neill;
they report a delightful visit with Sara
Wild Gordon x-'21. Sara and husband
spend the winter at their vacation
home in Mexico.



'24

The Class extends sincere sympa-
thy to Helen Robson Hamill, whose
husband passed away very suddenly
on June 4, 1969.



'28

Alice Graham x-'28 is enjoying her
new home at 23 Shannon Road, Har-
wich Centre, Mass.

'29

The Class extends sincere sympa-
thy to Emily Crump Ramstetter, whose
husband, Charles, passed away on
January 24, 1970.

We thank Lillian Doane Maddigan
'21 for sending a new address for
Lucia Lingham x-'29. Lucia, whose
hobby is raising Corgis, lives at 6107
South Transit Road, Lockport, N.Y.

Mary McConn was remarried in
October 1968. She is now: Mrs. James
Messeas, 411 South Pacific Avenue,
San Pedro, California.



'33

Helen (Jimmie) Breed Solberg
writes to Ruth Stafford Clark: "Son,
Kris, is still in Germany with his family.
My granddaughter, Astrid, is nearly
three years old — I would love to see
her. Daughter, Linda-Marie (Lasell '69)
is working for a Springfield (Mass.) in-
surance company." Ruth's Jeannie is
a Dean's list scholar at Smith.



'34



From Carol Morehouse Jones:



"Daughter, Kathy, (Lasell '67) is work-
ing for her B.S. in Nursing at Cornell
in New York City.

"We have a new granddaughter,
Amy Morehouse Ketchum, born March
15, 1969. Son, Bill, Jr. is a student at
Franklin and Marshall College, Lan-
caster (Pa.). Youngest daughter, Su-
san, completes Jr. High School work
in June."



'35

Ann Cobb reports a new name and
address. A year ago she married Em-
bert W. Comstock; they are living at
69 Mountain Avenue, Bayville, New
York. Ann has acquired a sixteen-
year old daughter, Malissa, and a
foster child in Greece.



'36

The Class extends sympathy to
Ginny Hausler Heath, whose husband
died of a heart attack on August 2,
1969.

Priscilla Queen, daughter of Char-
lotte Littlefield, was recently married
to Russell P. Chamberlain of Waltham
Mass.

Marge Bassett MacMillan's Christ-
mas letter was "written enroute from
Phoenix to New Jersey — after a spell
of grandmothering Betsy's (MacMillan
Blackledge '62) Mark and his brand
new twin brothers. I flew to Portland,




Oregon — had a good visit with sister
Betsy (Bassett Wells '38) and her fam-
ily; attended her son's wedding. Then
on to Arizona — two weeks of sheer
bliss helping with the two babies.
Daughter Jeanni has moved back to
Boston and is working at Mass. Gen-
eral on a research project on cardiac
output. Scott is at R.P.I, for his second
year, and Nancy is a junior in high
school. We have John to thank for
bringing Cindy, a dear girl, into our
family. They are living in East Orange;
John is working for Household Fi-
nance in the trainee program. Their
Brian was born September 3rd — the
year brought us three new grand-
sons!"




Class of 1932: Do you recognize these friends —
Peak's Island, June 1931?



Jerry, Nancy and Harriet (Newcomb '38) Stoughton

'40

Betty Phillips Dick is enjoying her
new and full-time position as secre-
tary to the principal of the Lincoln-
wood School in Evanston, III. Daugh-
ter Didi is a freshman at the University
of Vermont.



'41

We extend sincere sympathy to
Norma Forsberg Burman and to Helen
Forsberg Powers '39. Their mother,
Mrs. Frank Forsberg, passed away
two days before Thanksgiving. Norma
adds: "No matter how long Mothers
live, it just isn't long enough."



21




Dr. Marvine

Weatherby and

Ginny DeNyse '41

(Dallas-Oct. 1969)



Ginny DeNyse enjoyed an October
vacation with "Tex" (Marvine) Wea-
therby in Texas. Tex's office and med-
ical laboratory are located in the
Dallas Medical Arts Building; her "off"
hours are spent at the cattle ranch
outside the city. Ginny's travel reser-
vations were efficiently handled by
Gertrude Fischer, owner of a New
Canaan (Conn.) travel agency.



'42

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Crosby
(Ruth Turner) announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Janet Lynne
to Rodney Richard Stewart. Janet is
a senior at Wheelock College; a June
wedding is planned.

Barbara Kelly Morell writes from
136 Locksley Road, Lynnfield, Mass.:
"My eldest son, Chris, a graduate of
the University of New Mexico, is learn-
ing to fly for the Navy at Pensacola,
Fla. Number two son, Roy, graduated
cum laude in Mathematics from the
University of New Hampshire in June
'69. Allen is now a freshman at the
University of Maine. Winn Northrup
Mudge is a neighbor; we enjoy garden
club activities together. I am also



President of the Friends of the Lynn-
field Library. Best good wishes to the
Class of '42."

Jean Blackett, daughter of Marjorie
Ray, became the bride of Michael E.
Pickens on April 26, 1969 in Marietta,
Ohio. Ellen Jenkins, Dee Bracher's
eldest daughter, was married to Don
W. Rappold on June 28, 1969 in Free-
port, L.I.

From Jean Ferrell Howe: "our older
daughter, Judith, was graduated from
Lasell in June '68. She was married
on August 4th and is now in England
with her husband who is an exchange
teacher there. Our younger daughter
is a junior at the University of Denver.
Best wishes to Lasell friends."

Dr. and Mrs. George P. Trodella
(Claire DeConto) were recently hon-
ored at a surprise 25th Anniversary
dinner party. Dr. Trodella is Chief of
the Department of Obstetrics and Gy-
necology at the Lawrence Memorial
Hospital and is presently serving as
president of the Hospital's medical
staff. Their four children are George,
Jr., a recent graduate of the Univer-



sity of Miami; Richard Jay, a senior
at Tufts University; Robert Stephen,
a sophomore at Huntington Prepara-
tory School in Boston; and Carole
Marie, who attends the Washington
School in Winchester, Mass.

'43

Direct from a "relative" source:
Carol Wadhams Wolcott is a grand-
mother; Marion Griffin Wolcott '16 is
the great-grandmother. Andrew Phil-
lips Berling arrived on October 8,
1969. "Red hair. Everyone ecstatic."

'45

News from Marjorie Olson Bjork:
"Our son, Steven, is a senior at Clark
University; daughter, Carol, a fresh-
man at Mt. Holyoke; Laura is 10 — and
on January 20th (1969) we had a new
addition, David John. Right now, John
and I feel twenty years younger — will
let you know what it's like a couple
of years from now."




Happy 5th grader — Chip Carver
(Emma Gilbert '45)



David, Leslie and Gail Weld
(Jean Thiel '46)



22



Constance Arley Brown's May let-
ter reads in part: "On June 14, 1969,
our oldest daughter, Carol, will marry
Mr. Charles Halsted III. (Carol missed
being the class baby by only several
weeks). She graduated from the Uni-
versity of Maine in June 1968 as an



"As though two weddings in two
summers weren't enough, our third
daughter, Susan, became engaged in
February to Daniel Adkins of Newport
News, Virginia. They plan to be mar-
ried next summer! Dan is stationed at
the Groton (Conn.) Submarine Base.




The Todds

John, Ann, Johnny, and Bill

(Ann Avery '46)



tist Church. They have two children.
Ruth's works are in private collections
in Wellesley, Dorchester, Weston and
in New Hampshire and Delaware. She
exhibits each May in the Achushnet
Art Show during Massachusetts Art
Week.

From Jane Upton Perkins: "It has
saddened me to learn of the recent
passing of Dr. Inez Williams and of
Mrs. Ruth Fuller. It was not until sev-
eral years after my graduation that I
realized the wealth of information and
training I had received from Dr. Wil-
liams. In the fall of 1963 when our
daughter, Sandra (Perkins Jones '65)
entered Lasell I had the pleasure of
meeting Dr. Williams at the tea given
for students and parents. It was then
that I had the opportunity to tell her
of my feelings. I shall always be grate-
ful for that opportunity. In more recent
years I have been fairly successful in
the program of TOPS, and I have been
invited — this past year — to speak
at TOPS meetings throughout the
state of New Hampshire. Although it
is nearly twenty-three years since I
graduated from Lasell, Mrs. Fuller's
speech training came back like a
flash. I shall remember her most
fondly for she gave me the self con-
fidence I so needed."



Economics major and is presently
employed in the Trust Department of
Merchant's Trust Company, Bangor,
Maine.

"After six years in the Air Force,
Mr. Halsted matriculated at the Uni-
versity of Maine; graduated in January
1969 as a Radio and Television major;
is presently employed by the Univer-
sity of Maine's educational T.V. sta-
tion as an assistant cinematographer.

"Our second daughter, Nancy,
graduated from Becker Junior College
in June 1967. She worked as a legal
secretary in one of our local firms,
until she married Mr. Richard Parker
of Riverside, Conn, on August 3, 1968.
Dick will graduate from the University
of Connecticut in June 1969 as a
Mechanical Engineer and 2nd Lieu-
tenant in the R.O.T.C. He plans to
enter the Air Force.



"Last, but not least, is our youngest
daughter, Peggy, who is in Junior
High School. She has consistently
been on the Honor Roll, and we are
very proud of her. She is also fast be-
coming a fine horsewoman and has
successfully competed in local horse
shows in the Jumping Class for Junior
Riders.

"Like many parents, Walt and I
have wondered how our family could
have become so grown up, so fast!"



'47

An exhibit of twenty paintings by
Ruth Redden Decker were on view
throughout January at the New Bed-
ford (Mass.) Jewish Community Cen-
ter. Ruth is the wife of the Rev. Stanley
Decker, pastor of the Long Plain Bap-



'48

Born: To Nancy O'Rourke Trevisan,
ninth child, fourth son, Roger
Edward, on October 20, 1969.

From Doris Trefny Kennedy: "Just
a note to let you know there has been
a change in my name. Vincent lan-
doli and I were married June 29, 1968.
We are living in Park Ridge, N.J.
(265 Vitmar Place) and are in the
process of adding a study-den to the
house. Try to keep up with gardening.
We've planted over 300 annuals and
38 azalea bushes — there are more to
be planted! Recently, had a surprise
call from Martha Miller Willett. She is
living at 206 Kane Street, Brooklyn,
N.Y."

Ann Myers Beck writes: "Our latest
news is moving into a 14-room semi-




Nat Hall Campbell's ('49) "friends" with friends

Victorian house in Lisbon, Ohio (313
W. Lincoln Way). We surely needed
the room with our growing boys (14,
12, 8, 7) — two house dogs — three
tanks of tropical fish and two ham-
sters — oh yes — two green turtles. We
also have two rabbits."



'50

Claire Wallis Harris writes from
6106 James Alan Street, Cypress,
Calif.: "I am still catching my breath
and trying to get all the pieces to-
gether after our unexpected move
across country. It is a long way from
New England and we are really en-




joying it. Had a phone call from my
Lasell roommate, Ann Holaday Vin-
cent. She will be moving to California
this summer — we will be a few miles
apart for the first time in 13 years."



'53

Jean Weeks Hanna drew consider-
able attention last spring at the Glen
Cannon Golf Course in Brevard, N.C.
She aced the 120-yard thirteenth hole
with her #5 iron. Jean is the first lady
golfer to get a hole in one at the
Glen Cannon Course.




David, Karen and Douglas Hamel (Kay Poore '49)






Lois Hutchinson Woodward '51
"Our three sons"
Mark, Craig, Keith

Via the Holiday letter, Virginia Wil-
der Melitz accounts for her family:
"The biggest news, of course, is that
Peter is now vice-president of Mar-
keting with Boothe Resources Inter-
national, Inc. This means . . . joy of
all joys ... we will be Los Angeles
residents for quite some time. The
children are happy for they will not
be changing schools; I am happy be-
cause now I can REALLY settle down
and decorate our home. Kathy, seven,
is in the second grade and Scoti,
who will celebrate birthday #11 in



February, is in the sixth grade. Mark
and Missy, eighth graders, CHOSE
to take dancing lessons another year
(now it is called 'Cotillion' — to elim-
inate that 'Dancing School' stigma).
Mike entered his first year of senior
high — plays the trombone in the
marching and dance bands. Pete, Jr.
spent a delightful summer in Maine
with my aunt and uncle and is now
working after school to earn money
for a return trip next summer! The
entire family enjoyed skiing during
the Thanksgiving weekend; Pete and
I are looking forward to a February
ski vacation in Aspen."

'54

Patricia Flett Davidson's "activi-
ties" are summed up in her original
poem. Patty's mother is Mabel Rut-
ledge Flett x-'21; her sister: Jo-An
Flett Tyler '53.



No Maid Today,



Working Housewife!



Monday morning, I'm my own boss,
Books, taxes, leases to the wind I

shall toss.
Washer and dryer running at last,
At this speed I'll finish my housework

fast!
On Monday the trashmen arrive with

a frown,
You guessed it . . . they caught me

in my nightgown!
The wastebaskets are emptied, now

the sheets to the line
Then everything will go just fine.
The clotheslines are rusty, so I ap-
proach the backdoor
The washing machine's leaking . . .

all over the floor.
Birthday parties! In his pants I washed

some toffee,
OH . . . to my silent room, with a

cup of coffee!
That should make me feel much

better. . . .
Until I spill coffee all over my sweater!
Coffee . . . under the glass, the rug,

the bottom drawer;
Everything has to be washed with

woolite.
This housework really is a fright!



24



Step carefully, bathroom, bedroom,

all over the floor
I'm drying my sweaters, galore!
To the dryer to fold the clothes in

there,
Dry the sheets, then comb out my

hair.
I forgot to turn the dryer on. . . .
Now it will take the whole morn!
Ooooops! I spilled my hairclips and

rollers,
WHY DIDN'T I JOIN THE MONDAY

MORNING BOWLERS?
While picking them up, I got a run in

my stocking,
My inability is rather shocking.
I called the dentist, pulled the phone

off the wall,
On the terrazo floor I dropped my

"Polish de Nail"
This whole damn morning is making

me Pale!
Now with Nana for lunch at the Co-
lumbus Club,
I ought to go get drunk at the Pub!
It's hard to rhyme in this kind of

mood. . . .
But the good Lord knows, I've got the

food!
To supply you with a laugh of the

belly. . . .
I just broke a jar of my homemade

jelly!
I'm sorry I bit him over the phone,
At present my composure is prone.
Next Monday morning, and I'm my

own boss,
To the wind all this housework I'll

toss.
The maid settled in snug as a bug,
I'll run to work, feeling very smug!
Books, taxes, leases . . . all with a

grin,
Surely'll be a better mood I'll be in.
Instead of saying "How was your day,

dear?"
Just hug me like a Teddy Bear.
Just say "I love you, Little One,
Thank you for the work you've done!"

Corinda Johnson Deans is a mem-
ber of the Manpower office staff in
Stamford, Conn.

Six children, a dog and two turtles
have moved to Pheasant Run, Wilton,
Conn, with Mr. and Mrs. Robert E.
Logan (Ann Bowerman) from Scran-



ton, Pa. The Logans selected Wilton
because they liked the area and the
schools. It also is easy commuting
to New York City where Mr. Logan
is with I.B.M. Their children are Rob-
ert Jr., ten, Shaun, nine, Beth, seven,
Mary Jo, six, Mike, three and Danny,
age one.

Marion Crossman MacCallum tells
us: "Our children are growing much
too fast: Steven is 10; Jeffrey, 8;
Laurie, 5 and Scott, 2. Ray and I en-
joyed a marvelous trip to the British
Isles and Ireland last summer. We
rented a car and toured the English
and Scottish countryside."

From Shirley Sherwood Adams:
"We took a big step in February 1969
— my husband, Neil, is now a self-
employed Consulting Electrical Engi-
neer — he is extremely happy. A big
hello to all 54-ers — hope to have news
of Pickard girls!"

Joan Rabbitt Downey admits: "It is
good to be civilians again after two
years with the Army at Ft. Leonard
Wood, Mo. We are settled in Guilford,
Conn, (our first home) and are fast
becoming involved with community
affairs. My husband, Wayne, has
opened his office in town (Adult and
Child Psychiatry). Lincoln (6), Sharon
(4), and Susan (3) are our 3-Ring
Circus!"

Ruth Paetz Braun has a "recently
acquired private pilot's license."

Priscilla VanDine Redmond and
husband enjoyed a "thrilling vacation
in Germany, Switzerland, England
and Ireland. Priscilla is active in Red-



— . mmmm





Alan, Linda, Laura, and Ricky Wark
(Joan Hoffman '56)



Johnny Davis, 4 years; Linda Davis,
6 years; children of Anne M. Davis
(John G.) (Anne E. Merchant '55)

ding (Conn.) civic ventures; "at home"
she keeps up with Karen 10, Bruce
8, Alan 2, and Nancy 1.

'56

Born: To Janet Berry Auletta, a first
child, a daughter, Kimberly
Lynn, on March 18, 1969.

Gail Frank Wells reports her hus-
band's recent promotion with the Con-
tinental Can Company of New York.
Gail adds "we do much traveling,
which gives me an opportunity to
keep in touch with classmates about
the country."

Pattie Holland Bird writes: "It's
been so long since I've written in any
news — all's well here in Schenectady.
Wanted to make mention of our third
daughter, (fourth child) Darla Jean,
born on August 19, 1967. Hope to get
down Lasell way some day soon."



'57

From Sandy Bristol Walters: "New
surroundings for us; we moved to
Keene, N.Y. (12 Greenbriar Road) on
March 1st. Dave is now with the Che-
shire County Savings Bank in Keene,



25




Greg, Teddy and Kerry Ellen Metzler (Virginia Zipf '57)

as Treasurer. It is a lovely area and
we are looking forward to exploring
our new state by camping this sum-
mer. Next fall both children will be
in school all day — and I hope to get
back into the Med. Tech. world — at
least part-time."

In reply to the Alumnae Fund ap-
peal, Nancy Jean Sommer wrote to
"Tap" Tardivel Higgins: "I know —
within my heart, what my two years
at Lasell did for me — mainly — giving
me the inspiration to be successful
in my future goals. My goals have
been reached! I was a Retailing Ma-
jor! Today I buy for 16 retail stores,
in Conn, and N.Y. I have trained girls
from colleges similar to Lasell; they
are now Assistant Buyers. It is all
very hard dedicated work — but most
rewarding. I buy Junior Sportswear
— the very swinging department to-
day."

'59

Born: To Janet Roy Procino, second
child, first daughter, Elizabeth
Marie, on August 27, 1969.
To Joanne Curtis Island, third
child, second son, Matthew
Curtis, on December 28, 1969.
To Nancy Wilder Schmidt, a
son, David Ellis, on January 29,
1969.
Marjorie Borromey Lippert contin-
ues to "enjoy living in Florida. This
has been quite a year for us — our sec-
ond son, Ronald Justin, arrived on
January 31, 1969. Then there was a



new degree for my husband, David,
who graduated from Stetson Univer-
sity in Deland. He is presently an
engineer with G.E. in Daytona Beach.
From Judith Rakosky Baskin: "Alan,
the children — Peter and Mollie — and
I spent several most enjoyable days
last summer at the Cape with Betsy
Healy Shelby and her sons, David
and Drew. I received a note from
Lois DeCuollo Johnson, who tells of
the arrival of her third child, a daugh-
ter, Nancy. Lois, who lives in Dover,




Holly, William and Lisa Crooks
(Patricia Morgan x-'59)




The Magee's
(Mary Lou Teegarden '59)

N.J., enjoys frequent visits with Chris
Bergfalk King, nearby in Tenafly."

Mary Lou Teegarden Magee would
"love to see Boston friends. Should
anyone come to the Syracuse area,
do be sure to call." Mary Lou's ad-
dress: 136 Stolp Avenue, Syracuse,
N.Y.

19 Clifton Avenue, Marblehead,
Mass. is now the home address for
Patricia Moran Crooks x-'59. Her hus-
band is the general attorney for the
Boston and Maine Railroad; their chil-
dren are Lisa, 8; Holly, 7 and William
III, 3.



'60

Barbara Ann Ainsworth Owens is
now in Bangkok, where her Lcdr.
husband is with the Personal Services



Gary David with Ronald Justin Lippert
(Marjorie Borromey '59)

Branch of the Military Aide and As-
sistance Command for Thailand. Her
address: Jus Mag Thai Box 354, APO,
San Francisco 96346.

"The Coyles (Marcia Gardner) are
getting ready to move again! This
summer, after David receives his Mas-
ter's Degree from the University of
Idaho, we will be moving to Austin,
Texas. In the fall he will begin work
on his Doctorate at the University of
Texas, where he has a teaching as-
sistantship."

Joan M. White has been named
administrative assistant to the presi-
dent of Market Sense, Inc. in Roches-
ter, N.Y. She formerly was broadcast
production director with Hutchins Ad-
vertising and Hart-Conway and sales
promotion assistant, WHEC, Inc.



26



"Hi," writes Joan Corthouts Gray-
son. "We are moving back to Con-
necticut (1 Birch Road, West Hart-
ford), where my husband will open
an office for private practice of psy-
chiatry. Recently spent a weekend
with my Lasell roommate, Wendy
Holmes Pearson, who now lives in
York, Penna."

News from Linda Ostrom Goodwin:
"My husband received his Ph.D. in
metallurgy from R.P.I, in June '68.
Our first child, Scott William, was
born July 9, 1968 in Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
where we now live — and love it! Gene
is employed by Union Carbide here;
I have been teaching nursery school
three days a week. Would very much
enjoy hearing from those girls at
Chandler House!"



'61

Born: To Susan Dennison Harmon,
second child, first son, Fred-
erick Joel, on June 11, 1969.




Sabra Knowlton Brea '60 with
Cesar, Francisco and Edwardo



To Natalie Granchelli Towle,
third child, second son,
Michael Brian, on September
6, 1969.

To Nancy Morse Welch, a son,
Jonathan Edward, on Septem-
ber 9, 1969.

The latest arrival to the John
Sullivan (Betsy Schwingel)
family is Jeffery Paul, who was
born on July 7, 1968 in San
Diego. Jeff joins Carrie Ann, 6;
Jim, 5; and Meg, 4.

"GOD JUL, BUON NATALE, FROH-
LICHE WEINACHTEN, JOYEUX NOEL,
HAPPY HANNUKKAH ... No matter
how you say it, there's a definite
universal message that comes with a
holiday spirit! With that thought in
mind, we begin the Daniel Wilsons'
(Carole Kirschner) 6th Publication.

"Winter ice brought tragedy to the
Pontiac; so after three years of good
service, we traded it and adopted a
Saab for Dan and a Volkswagen
'Squareback' for Carole. As the wind
blew, Dan was elected program chair-
man of the Frederick (Md.) Jaycees.
With the arrival of spring came Craig's
5th birthday — and the loss of his first
baby tooth. For Heather — the loss of
her diapers! Summer created a job
for Mom — poodle clipping. Dad made
the rounds with his guitar.

"In June we were caught up in a
land promotion program for a ski re-
sort area in Pennsylvania; now we
have plans for an 'A' frame. Then
came the Folk Feast, our summer
party: food, beer and folk music!

"Fall brought our anniversary and
a dog show. Our new dog, Jon-Jon,
won first prize! It looks like we shall
make it back to the slopes this year
— and Dan will be singing at the ski
lodge on weekends.

"And that's it . . . but not without
remembering the Holiday spirit and
the hope that men put aside their
differences and live in peace. At this
time of year, even the most jaded
among us can experience once again
the ecstatic feeling of being ten years
old — and the generation gap melts
away like a snowman in a warm sun."



Wendy Wolfenden writes a glowing
account of her vacation stay at the
Jamaica Reef Hotel and Yacht Har-
bour in Port Antonio, Jamaica, West
Indies. For "tripping" friends, she
highly recommends The Irish Linen
Shop and the Jamaica Reef.

Patricia McKinnon Williams writes
from 119-A Charleston Court, Win-
ston-Salem, N.C.: "After seven years
of working in New York City, I am
now thoroughly enjoying Southern
leisure! I was married on November
4, 1968 to W. Earl Williams, an engi-
neer with Western Electric Company.
Dottie Musche visited us here in Sep-
tember — she lives in Ramsey, N.J.
and continues her work in the City."



'62

Born: To Linda DiFazio Lech, a son,
Michael, on July 8, 1969.
To Janet Fields Gielchinsky,
second child, a daughter,
Karen Sarah, on November 8,
1969.

To Gwen Lincoln Colley, third
child, second son, David
Bruce, on September 3, 1969.
To Betsy MacMillan Black-
ledge, twin sons, Andrew Craig
and Steven Todd, on Novem-
ber 9, 1969.

To Linda Shaghalian Penni-
man, a daughter, Courtney, on
September 8, 1969.




Dana Lee Hall
(Diane Napoli '62)



27




Mark and Greg Howes
(Patricia Naples '62)

Dear Editor:

What is a frustrated alumna like
myself supposed to do with the feel-
ings I have now after just reading The
LEAVES and finding no news what-
ever for the Class of 1962?




Janice (Toran '62) and Larry Stucki
with Laurel Renee



After the miserable turn-out we had
at Reunion two years ago, and now
we are not even represented in the
magazine, it would seem the epitaph
has been written and once again apa-
thy is the victor!

At the risk of being called 'square,'
I share my feelings and let someone
know that / care about and think of
those gals with whom I shared two
wonderful years of my life, and want
to hear of and from them via" The

LEAVES.

-Betsy Mercer Henderson

Ann Barnett Friedman writes to La-
sell's Director of Admissions, Marie
Kaden '53: "Have been intending to
inform the College of my marriage
to Dr. Sidney Friedman, Jr., who prac-
tices dentistry in Memphis. We have
a two-year old son, Sidney III. It would
be a great thrill for me to attend the
10th Reunion of our Class and to see
Lasell friends."

In a recent note to Marcia Madden,
Janice Toran Stucki writes: "Laurel
Renee Stucki was born May 23, 1968
in Honolulu. Our first little one has
proved to be quite a traveler — at the
age of two months she traveled with
us to Iwakuni, Japan, for a six-month
stay. We returned to Hawaii in Febru-
ary — have since toured all the Islands.
My husband will be attending Gradu-
ate School the next two years at Mof-
fett, California. After that we hope to
return to the East Coast— after all,
we must ready Laurel for Lasell!"

In late May Virginia Tsouros was
awarded the silver wings of an Amer-
ican Airlines stewardess and has been
assigned to flight duty out of New
York City.

Carol Miller Glassman, husband
and daughter Deborah are now living
at 772 Princeton Place, Rockville,
Maryland. Carol's husband has a two-
year assignment in research at the
National Cancer Institute.

From Susan Brooks Weiner: "We
are off to Tampa, Florida in June '69.
Bob is completing orthopedic resi-
dency at Henry Ford Hospital and will
do a year's fellowship at Tampa Gen-
eral Hospital. Robin (4) and Jason (2)
look forward to the swimming and
sunshine — as do their parents."




Mark Blackledge

Mother: Betsy MacMillan '62

Grandmother: Marjorie Bassett '36

The Kansas City Chamber of Com-
merce should contact Anne Marie
Klimt, who writes: "For five years I
have been secretary and Girl Friday
to Dr. Edward E. Haith, a general sur-
geon in Kansas City. K.C. is a beau-
tiful place and has much to offer. We
have the famous Nelson Art Gallery
— where you can spend an entire day
and see but little of the many collec-
tions. In summer months there is the
well-known Starlight Theatre — a huge
open-air facility that seats about 8000
people. There are many parks for pic-
nics, and for the horseback riding
buff, there are more than ten stables
from which to choose. And the K.C.
Jazz Festival is really great!"

Linda Resnick Freedman is cur-
rently attending the extension pro-
gram offered by the University of
New Hampshire. Linda is working to
obtain a degree in Education.



'63

Married: Barbara Richmond x-'63 to
John H. Nelson on October
2, 1965. They live at 82
Gould Road in Andover,



28




Sidney Friedman, III
(Ann Barnett '62)

Mass. with their daughter
Dorothy Faith (Dotti), who
was born on May 14, 1969.
Born: To Susan Ramsay Davis, a
son, Brett Ramsay, on August
23, 1969. Grandmother: Bar-
bara Heath Ramsay '35.

'64

Born: To Colleen Welch Perry, sec-
ond child, first daughter,
Colleen Beth, on December 24,
1969.
It was good to hear from Sandy
Nims Eubanks: "Since our marriage
in November 1964, my husband and
I have 'bounced' back and forth from
Alabama (his home) to New Jersey
five times. Consequently, I have not
written to Lasell to let my friends know
where we were. Our present and per-
manent address is 11 Juniper Street,
Mount Holly, N.J. We have two daugh-
ters — Lisa Kathryn, born in December
1965, and Jacqueline Lee, born in
May 1968. Gary is working for the
Federal Government on missiles; I
keep busy selling home products
about the neighborhood and babysit-
ting for a working mother. Hello to



my Lasell friends and a special greet-
ing to Miss Helen Beede."

Also reporting new addresses are
Judith Stone Matthews and Dana
Wynn Kantrovitz. Judy, her husband
and two sons are now at 4736-B Brad-
ford Drive, Dallas, Texas, where Dr.
Matthews is associated with the Park-
land Hospital. Dana and family have
moved from Hartford to 191 Allings
Crossing Road in West Haven. Dana's
husband is a lawyer with the firm of
Brownstein and DiPietro; their daugh-
ter, Amy, is nearly a year old.

Susan Childs Merrick's husband is
now in the Boston office of Time, Inc.
They live at 36 Crosby Road in Chest-
nut Hill; Susan teaches nursery school
in Newton.

Linda Parmenter planned to leave
in August for a teaching position in
Germany. "After two successful years
in the Westport (Conn.) school sys-
tem, I am looking forward to this
new experience. Traveling, skiing,
visiting friends and enjoying the new
surroundings should keep me busy."

Sue Eckstrom enjoys her work as
secretary to the manager and assist-
ant manager of marine systems at
Sikorsky Aircraft Division of the
United Aircraft Corporation. Sue is
looking forward to a "return" vacation
to Hawaii.

It has been announced that Laurie
Bullot has been named assistant pro-
duction manager in the broadcasting
area of Venet Advertising, Inc. of New
York. Laurie, a graduate of Boston
University, was formerly a member of
the staff of Envision Productions and
WGBH-TV, both in Boston.

Memos from Bonnie Milne Drewes:
Sue Heller Napolitano x-'64 had her
second child, a big son, Keith Patrick,
on February 22, 1969. Sandra Hardy
Harrison's son, Jamey Radcliffe, ar-
rived the following day — February 23.
Sandra's address is 5234 East 24th
Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska. Sue Ten-
ney Black and husband are now in
Ithaca, where he is attending Law
School. My husband, Martin, is in his
fourth year of architecture. Betsy
Gegler: I can't find you in the New
York City telephone book!



Sandra Silverman Greene is now
at 1300 Jefferson Park Avenue, Char-
lottesville, Virginia. Her husband is a
student at the University of Virginia's
Law School. Their daughter, Elise
Julie, was born on January 6, 1969.

'66

Born: To Linda Mars Lindstrand, a

daughter, Laura Heather, on

November 23, 1969.

To Anne Ames Heimbach, a

son, James Taylor, on March

20, 1969.

From Colette Cavanaugh Clark:

"Husband Jim has returned from Viet

Nam, where he was with the Third

Marine Division. His shoulder injury

has improved and he is now stationed

at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Have

kept in touch with Nancy Olson Lam-

parelli, who was married on August

30, 1969 and is now living at 1012

Summer Street, Stamford, Conn."

Lisa Benson Pickett has a new ad-
dress: 4201 Massachusetts Avenue,
N.W., Washington, D.C. She adds:
"Was graduated from The American
University in June of 1968 with a B.A.
in French. Am now working on my
Master's degree; will begin teaching
French on the secondary level in Sep-
tember 1969. Michael Dennis Pickett
of Rockville, Maryland and I were
married on September 8, 1968. He
too is a graduate of American Uni-




Tiffany (3) and Elizabeth (V/z)
(Loel Mercer Poor '63)



29 !




Deborah Anne Fuchs
(Betty Turner '66)




James L. Clark III

Son of Colette Cavanaugh Clark

Class of '66

versity and is now a government em-
ployee in Washington."

Lois Sawyer Caulfield is enthusi-
astic about her work with Navajo
Indian children in New Mexico. "It is
a most happy happy experience! Any
Lasell girls interested in a challenging
and highly interesting job — do write
to the Bureau of Indian Affairs for
information."

Elinore Lowe is working for a Mas-
ter's in Education at San Francisco
State College. Elinore graduated from
Whittier College in June '68; then set
off for eight months of student living
in Europe.

Nancy Tallman directs her recent
letter to The Alumnae Office: "I do
have interesting news. Since my grad-
uation, I have been employed through
Mercantile Stores Company in their
central buying office in New York.
(Got the job via their on-campus in-
terview, by the way). Last summer I
was promoted to glove buyer — at that
time I was the youngest buyer in the
company — there are some 65 depart-
ment stores in the U.S. Was also as-
signed a full-time assistant — Claire
Bertonis, Lasell '68. In October I at-
tended the Olympic Games in Mexico



— stayed with family friends, whose
aunt, Senora Maria Cobb, was my
Spanish instructor at Lasell. In July '69
I plan to visit my family at their new
home in Sao Paulo, Brazil. They re-
cently moved there from Wilmington,
Delaware. Very exciting!"

'67

Nancy Goodall Manston sends a
new address — 2101 Donna Street,
North Las Vegas, Nevada — and spe-
cial greetings for the Secretarial De-
partment. "Hi to Miss Josephs and
Mrs. Manghue! Often think of my
many Lasell friends and instructors —
and of the wonderful training I re-
ceived. Have been working for a small
concrete company — I am receptionist,



typist, telephone operator, payroll
clerk! Just love it and I am always
busy. My husband is stationed at Nel-
lis AFB here in Las Vegas."

In San Francisco are both Janet
McGuckian and Cynthia Rudokas.
Janet is attending San Francisco State
College and is a part-time secretary
at California Blue Shield. Cynthia's
address is 2227 Filbert Street.

Mary Glabach Field had her first
one-man show of oil paintings at the
Greenfield (Mass.) Public Library in
June. She showed ten oils she has
done since she and her husband re-
turned to Northfield in November '68.
While her husband was serving in
the Navy in Vietnam, Mary worked for
the Mural Arts Company in Norfolk,
Virginia.




Ensign and Mrs. Donald Hinsman (Audrey Hammar '67)
December 22, 1968



30



'68

Lynne Houser was graduated in
August from United Air Lines stew-
ardess school in Chicago. She was
employed as a nurse in the intensive
care unit of the Danvers Hunt Me-
morial Hospital prior to becoming a
stewardess.

Sherry Swain was married on Feb-
ruary 15, 1969 to George C. Dey, a
1967 graduate of Babson Institute. He
is presently serving as a lieutenant
in the Army; stationed at Hancock
Field, Syracuse, N.Y. Sherry is a sec-
retary with the Syracuse Supply Com-
pany.



Mary Lysbeth Casey Terkelsen is
secretary to the superintendent of
Penn Military Academy at Hesperin,
Calif. Her new address is 20220 Ser-
rano Road, Apple Valley.

Patricia Hallock Wehle writes: "The
LEAVES might be interested to know
that I now live on a 2400-acre breed-
ing farm in upstate New York. We
breed harness (standard) horses;
race horses and sell over the world.
We have three stallions and breed
about 200 mares a year. I've delivered
about 20 'babies' — something not too
many girls can say. Business takes
us all over the country for racing
meets and sales. My husband, also





Mrs. Thomas Cullen (Norey Dotterer '67) (Mother: Evelyn Bostel '28)



Scott Davis Whipple
Son of (Barbara Davis Whipple '48)

associated with the farm, will gradu-
ate in January '70 from Rochester
Institute of Technology. He then plans
to join the family-owned Genesee
Brewing Company."

Pamela Maddock was married on
April 19, 1969 to Bruce Allan Donham,
a 1966 graduate of Babson Institute,
at the Unitarian Church of All Souls,
New York City. Susan Droge x-'68
was Pam's maid of honor; Sherry
Swain, a bridesmaid. The Donhams
honeymooned in South Carolina; are
now living at Parr Lake Drive, New-
burgh, New York. Bruce is stationed
at Stewart AFB, and Pam is secretary
to the Executive Vice President and
Treasurer of the Columbus Trust Com-
pany in Newburgh.



31



In Memoriam



Sarah Dyer Darling x-'03 on November 21, 1969 in

Hartford, Conn.
Frances Buzelle Lamprey x-'05 on August 30, 1969 in

Laconia, N.H.
Cornelia Eaton Sutton '07 on November 16, 1969.
Charlotte Ryder Hall '08 on January 3, 1970 in Bangor,

Me.

Katherine H. Wheeler '09 on November 27, 1969 in
St. Paul, Minn.

Ellen Avery Turner x-'10 on June 1, 1968 in Peoria, III.
Marion Bemis Schlesinger x-'11 on August 4, 1969 in
Longmeadow, Mass.

Fan Thomas Druckenmiller x-'11 on October 11, 1969
in Lansford, Penna.

Ruth Vollrath Ross '12 on March 20, 1969 in Sheboygan,

Wis.
Mildred Smith Leach '14 on November 4, 1969 in

Providence, R.I.
Hazel Shaw Schaupp x-'14 on November 26, 1969 in

Fort Dodge, Iowa.
Genevieve Watkins Stecker x-'15 on July 22, 1969.
Julia Ellis Morrison x-'16 on October 19, 1969 in

Torrington, Conn.

Elsie Hughes Hilton '18 on January 11, 1970 in

Rochester, N.Y.
Flora Mae Harrison Clifford x-'19 on October 20, 1969.
Ethelle Cleale Collett '22 on November 23, 1969 in

Bangor, Me.
Isabel Lummus '24 on November 26, 1969 in Montclair,

N.J.
Natalie Caldwell Sheridan (W.P. '30-'34, H.S. '34-'36)

on April 30, 1969 in Sarasota, Fla.
Betty Dean Daugherty '31 on March 19, 1969 in

Virginia Beach, Va.
Mary Hill Davis '33 on September 30, 1969 in Portland,

Me.
Dorothea Panesis Nord '35 on June 24, 1969 in Los

Angeles, Calif.
Mary Josephine Doherty Dagle '39 in July 1969.

Mildred Fraser Pauley '42 on September 6, 1969 in

Bradenton, Fla.
Barbara Morton Smith '47 in November 1969 in

Plymouth, Mich.
Mrs. Anna B. Howard (Staff '35-'54) on February 4, 1970

in Newport, Vt.



Clubs



Western Massachusetts

Mrs. Mallery M. Boynton '38 and Mrs.
Gerald M. Westberg '45 were co-hostesses at
a luncheon meeting for the regional club
at the home of Mrs. Boynton in Suffield,
Conn, on Jan. 28. Miss MacClymon '32 and
Miss McClelland discussed current events
at the college.

Greater Boston

A February meeting was held on the 5th
in Wolfe Hall on the campus for potential
students and alumnae in the area. Students
representing Secretarial, Nursing, Child
Study, and Retailing Departments formed a
panel to discuss the curriculum and the
vocational preparation offered in each.

Florida

Mrs. William Gillette '38 made the plans for
an impromptu after-Christmas meeting
for resident and vacationing West Coast
Florida alumnae at the Sheraton Motor Inn
in St. Petersburg.

Mrs. Florence Pipes '37 is the new president
of the Florida Gold Coast Club; Mrs. G.
Hadley Sloan '53 is secretary-treasurer.

Rhode Island

Mrs. Robert Adler '53 reports monthly
meetings continue in the Rhode Island group,
and for the seventh year area alumnae
have participated in the co-op Christmas sale
at the Providence Unitarian Church.

Connecticut Valley

The annual October luncheon of the
Connecticut Valley alumnae was held at
Wampanoag Country Club, in West Hartford.

Philadelphia-South Jersey

Mrs. J. Wyman Worthington '24 was
hostess at an alumnae luncheon Nov. 1 at
the Marion Cricket Club in Haverford, Pa.
Mrs. David G. Bailey '59 of 789 St. Davids
Ave., Warminster, Pa. is currently club
president.



The Twenty-second
Annual Alumnae Council Meetings

to be held

April 3 and 4, 1970
and the

ANNUAL MEETING OF LASELL ALUMNAE, INC.

9:30 Saturday, April 4
Wolfe Hall

will be followed by

Luncheon
with

Guest Speaker, President-elect
Dr. Kenneth M. Greene

All contributors to the annual alumnae fund are invited to attend
the annual meeting and luncheon. Please fill out and return the
form below if you do plan to attend.



I plan to attend the annual meeting
I plan to attend the luncheon

Name and Class



Address



Return to: ALUMNAE OFFICE

LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 02166



LASELL
LEAVES









^&m^




Alumnae Council Issue
Spring 1970




Lasell Alumnae, Inc.



Officers 1970-71

President

Sandy Shelton Fitch '56 (Mrs. Norman P.)

9 Fox Lane, Medfield 02052

First Vice-President

Penny Rafkin Hurwitz '56 (Mrs. Budd H.)
4 Rolling Drive, Framingham 01701

Second Vice-President

Kay Woolaver Parsons '46 (Mrs. George E.)
32 Marcia Road, Watertown 02171

Recording Secretary

Betty Williams McGowan '47 (Mrs. F. M., Jr.)
52 Brewster Avenue, Braintree Highlands 02185

Corresponding Secretary

Lee Pool Langley '46 (Mrs. P. B.)
355 Highland Street, Weston 02193

Treasurer

Ruth Turner Crosby '42 (Mrs. R. A.)
170 Harvard Street, Newtonville 02160

Assistant Treasurer

Ruth Buswell Isaacson '36 (Mrs. C. G. G.)

10 Laurel Avenue, Waltham 02154

Alumnae Fund Committee

Alice Pratt Brown '29 (Mrs. William W.)
Crest Road, Middlebury, Conn. 06762

Mildred Bell Cole '31 (Mrs. Oliver S.)
95 Fox Hill Street, Westwood 02090



Directors

Mildred Strain Nutter '17 (Mrs. Denton G.)
1094 Centre Street, Newton Centre 02159

Toni Meritt Smith '23 (Mrs. W. N.)

110 Woodland Road, Auburndale 02166

Dorothy Inett Taylor '30 (Mrs. L. D.)
41 Brentwood Drive, Holden 01520

Shirley Gould Chesebro '33 (Mrs. R. Alan)
110 Carver Road, Newton Highlands 02161

Faye Wadhams Smith '38 (Mrs. Edward L.)
Duncaster Lane, Bloomfield, Conn. 06002

Camie Porter Morison '40 (Mrs. Wm. K.)
8 Park Ridge, Concord, N.H. 03301

Marilyn Blodgett Hall '46 (Mrs. E. Sherman, Jr.)
60 Ledgelawn Avenue, Lexington 02173

Mary Small Lee '48 (Mrs. Walter C.)
192 Pine Ridge Road, Waban 02168

Judy Parker Haas '49 (Mrs. R. H.)

3 Sherwood Road, Nashua, N.H. 03060

Linda Nolin Ahern '55 (Mrs. Robert)
106 Hemlock Street, Arlington 02174

Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 (Mrs. Bruce B.)
3 Knollwood Drive, Dover 02030

Nancye Van Deusen Connor '57 (Mrs. Philip J.)
28 Pilgrim Road, Wellesley 02181

Susan Shaw Abbott '61 (Mrs. William S.)
24 Kimball Road, Arlington 02174

Nan Sparks Hunter '61 (Mrs. Carl E.)
69 Main St., Framingham Centre 01701



Louise Tardivel Higgins '37 (Mrs. C. A., Jr.)
150 Hickory Road, Weston 02193

Scholarship Committee Chairman

Virginia Wolfe Perkins '44 (Mrs. E. F., Jr.)
76 Orchard Lane, Melrose 02176



Alumnae Secretary

Marjorie MacClymon '32

Lasell Junior College, Auburndale 02166

Lasell Leaves



Editor

Patricia Searles

Alumnae Editor

Marjorie MacClymon '32



The Lasell Leaves is published quarterly by Lasell Alumnae, Inc., Lasell Junior College, Auburndale, Mass. 02166,
a member of the American Alumni Council since 1947. The views expressed herein are those of the editor and do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of the administration or Lasell Alumnae, Inc. Single copies of Lasell Leaves may
be obtained for $1.25 from the Alumnae Office. Application for second-class postage permit pending at Boston,
Massachusetts.



L
A
S
E
L
LEAVES



Vol. XCV No. 3
May 1970



Cover:

Familiar campus scenes
take on new profile with spring

Photo Credits:
Bachrach:9
H.Robert Case: 18
Robert Chalue: 4, 5, 12, 14, 15, 17,18
Lincoln Studios: 13
Cover, the editor



Contents



Point/Counterpoint 2

Keeping Advance of

Retailing Developments 4

Alumnae Council 1970 6

Alumnae Career Panel 6

Dr. Greene Sees Bright

Future for Lasell 8

The Lasell Medallion 10

From Lesotho to Lasell 12

From the Campus 14

Clubs 16

Conference, Language Rooms

Open in Library 18

Class Notes 19

In Memoriam 32



Point...



In the 70's meeting the challenge of
today's changing times will continue to call
for improved communication in every field
— perhaps most of all in education.

The first Leaves of the decade was re-
shaped to begin to meet this challenge at
the level of alumnae communication with
the college by providing a broader frame-
work for meaningful interchange. So, while
the News From Lasell will continue to bring
you bulletins of events on campus and off,
the Leaves will take its cue from a some-
what wider scope of current issues shaping
the world, and education specifically. It
will also report on the interface between the
college and change, on the people and
policies giving life to the college today; and
will view these efforts from the perspective
of history occasionally, too.

The Leaves can be more than a source
of information and communication from the
college to you if you, in return, will share
your ideas as well as your experiences with
us. And, it is in the hope you will take the
opportunity to make it more meaningful, that
we welcome your increased participation.



And Counterpoint



To the Editor:

The response among our readers to
"Junior College or Early College?", which
appeared in the March 1970 issue, has been
so extensive, we have included a few of the
more interesting replies here. The article
proposed Lasell's reconsideration of the
four-year college concept to include the
last two years of high school and the first
two of college, as an accelerated college-
level program.

"Re 'Junior College or Early College,'
I have some comments to make:

1. There is little doubt in my own mind that
we are headed toward a compressing of
the traditional 16-year establishment
educational program, and the original
Lasell commission is one of the more
interesting ways to accomplish this.

2. The requirement for increasing speciali-
zation is already a fact of life and the
solid 4-year general education you pro-
pose should better equip most of our
students to make the all important
choice of just what that field of speciali-
zation should be and how best to pre-
pare for it.

3. Whether Lasell should resume the ex-
periment is difficult for me to say, but I
do feel very strongly that the kind of
educational opportunity you describe is
essential and will be offered by an in-
creasingly large number of institutions.

4. I have long felt that general education
until the age of 22 is not really the best
way to prepare a human being to make
a living. The age of the generalist is
rapidly drawing to a close.

This is an interesting concept and we wish

you every success."

— Craig T. Senft, Pres.
Litton Educational
Publishing Inc., and
husband of Lois Form
Senft '50



"My younger sister is a boarder at Simon's
Rock and has been doing much of her
studying college-style ... I strongly feel
that if at all financially possible, Lasell
should look into a similar program."

— Linda Loomis Tinsley '63
Brighton, Mass.



"I wonder! Granted the youth of today is
far more mature and sophisticated than
that of my generation, does it have the
emotional stability to carry through with



what is actually a crash program for that
age group? The pressure on High School
youngsters of today is appalling.

"What is so wrong with the term 'Junior
College'? Frankly I would not want a
daughter of mine to enter such a 'tele-
scoped' college career unless she had a
strong physique, an above-average I.Q.,
was 'career-minded' and had a previously
high scholastic record."

— Barbara Smith Huntington '22
San Antonio, Texas



"I was not aware of the basic thinking that
went into the original founding of Lasell,
but I now must give tremendous credit to
the Lasell brothers. If the need for change
in education was even thought of in 1851 ,
the need now for revolutionary thinking
is imperative.

"I know there will be problems, but I hope
Lasell is strong enough to forge ahead in
this troubled work and give our youth the
change and challenge they are asking for."

— Joan Weiler Arnow '49
Scarsdale, N.Y.

"I think I would very much like to see the
old system tried again; it meant so much to
me and gave so much in every way. Why
couldn't it do the same in this day and age?"

— Jessie Shepherd Brennan '17
New York City



"I believe there will always be a need for
the two-year college, with courses planned
for the student who is not quite certain of
her goal, or wishes to take college work
on a smaller campus, or to get good train-
ing and background for a profession. Let
the high schools graduate their students,
and let Lasell concentrate on the offering
of challenging college courses for the stu-
dent as an individual — not as a number in
mass education."

— Helen L. Beede '21
Orleans, Vt.



"I have listened to many college juniors —
I have a granddaughter there now — who
seem so restless during this particular year
that perhaps they do stay in college too
long. It also seems to me that High Schools
high pressure their students with too many
extra-curricular activities, which might be
eliminated with an early college selection.



"But to answer your question, while there
are loads of 16-year-olds in boarding
schools, I don't know whether I would be
willing to enter a 10th grader in college
unless put to the test."

— Elizabeth Love Macey '08
Indianapolis, Ind.



"I am slightly confused as to the proposi-
tion. Do you suggest Lasell become a four-
year college leading to a Bachelor's degree
— or two years of high school and two years
of college? Either would be a good idea,
but it would cost money for expanded
equipment and housing."

— Helen Carter Johnson '07
Chicago, III.



"A school such as Lasell conceived as a
four-year term would certainly be able to
combine the preparation in the younger
girl with a view to a total educational ex-
perience, and in the doing, cut down the
time, frustration and also most importantly
the cost . . .

"If a daughter isn't prepared to direct her
own life with poise, honor or her best in-
interests by the tenth grade, she probably
won't be any better off by the 12th."

— Virginia Ogden Hayes '33
Edgewood, R.I.



Keeping Advance of
Retailing Developments




Candia Ann Miltenburg '70



Linda Francine Warren '71



Mix fourteen chic models from freshman and
senior classes with some fifty spring and sum-
mer outfits, add a lively narration from com-
mentator Chris White 70, stir with colorful
clown-costumed usherettes, season with a
stage full of merry-go-round horses and bright
balloons — and the tone is set for a gala "Carni-
val of Fashion." So, in a brisk parade of style
and color from formal pantsuits to swim-wear,
with many a mini, maxi, and midi in between,
the Retailing Club's fashion show swept spring
onto the campus on March 17.

The annual show, which reportedly takes about
three weeks' preparation time, was only one,
and not the last, of the club's activity schedule
for 1969-70. To begin the year at the fall meet-
ing were guests Nancy and Linda Gail Brimlow,
Susan Ferrick Barton and Jackie Doucette, all
from the class of '69 and all now in executive
training programs in Boston-area retailing. Re-
turning to talk about their current work assign-
ments, their enthusiasm and the following
question period, not only led the meeting into
overtime, but has been reflected in the seniors'
response to representative recruiters on
campus this winter, according to department
chairman, Dr. Charles E. Barry.



The level of interest among students in the club
is, in fact, symptomatic of something happen-
ing in the Retailing Department itself — the first
ever to be established in a junior college—
which, in the six years since Dr. Barry came to
Lasell, has undergone dramatic changes in its
curriculum.

As general manager of Grover Cronin in Wal-
tham, and a pioneer in the field of retail educa-
tion at Northeastern University, and at Boston
University where he has taught human relations
until recently, Dr. Barry believes that the rate
of development within the field is such that it
is now almost impossible for someone who
does not wear two hats, as he does, to keep
education attuned to the pace. Changes in con-
sumer buying habits, in management practices,
in consumer products themselves, have all con-
tributed to the changing pattern of merchan-
dising today. "Because retailing is diversified
and changing," Dr. Barry says, "we are trying
to give a realistic approach, using scientific
methods, and keeping in mind the academic
structure — the fact that these are credit
courses."

Presently the full two-year program at Lasell
includes required courses for both freshmen
and seniors from a broad range of subjects out-
side as well as within the Retailing Department
itself. For freshmen this means taking subjects
from the secretarial, economics, English, psy-
chology, and speech departments to supple-
ment their retailing work. The first year retail-
ing courses themselves are concerned with de-
fining the basics of each of the retailing func-
tions within the entire system so that, for
example, merchandising, publicity, and cus-
tomer service are analyzed individually to
determine the role, the mechanics, and the
relation of each to the other functions.

For the second-year student, who has these
basics behind her, Dr. Barry has introduced
the case method into the curriculum. In this
type of study the student determines and de-
fines the problem to which she must address
herself by finding as many facts as possible
about the case as given to her. Looking first



into the details and the background of the case,
including the customer's background or other
relevant information, she then makes a factual
decision, based only on whatever information
was available to her at that time. As a third step,
she weighs the advantages and disadvantages
of the decision she has made and, of course,
spells out her conclusions at the same time.

The case study method is being used, Dr. Barry
explains, because it is an effective way of
bringing realism to the classroom. "We can no
longer teach retailing in a set curriculum of
do's and don't's. It's neither a positive nor a
negative, black nor white, but rather some area
of gray, where you must reason out a situation,
and in retailing particularly, which is changing
so fast and where competition is so keen, you
must be open-minded, flexible, versatile, and
you must be sure you can justify your decision."

Freshmen now have an opportunity too to step
out of classroom theory into retailing practice
through a Thanksgiving-to-Christmas field
work program, formerly limited to seniors. Ex-
tending the work period to students with only
three months of actual curriculum study, ex-
plains Dr. Barry, gives them a chance to learn
before one and a half years in the program,
whether or not they are really suited to the
merchandising field. They are assigned to stores
in the Boston area whenever possible, so that
members of the faculty can go at least once to
see the students on the job, to get their reac-
tions and those of their supervisors, and to
make a performance rating of their work.

To make the experience more meaningful, they
are required to keep a record of their own, such
as a diary recording daily sales results, new




customer situations, special assignments —
any specific in which they became involved. At
the end of the period they submit, and are
graded on, a report which includes a descrip-
tion of the job, an analysis of the organization
by policy, size, and structure, their objective
impression of the assignment as a whole, and
comments that seem relevant to the experi-
ence.

When their senior field work assignments come
the following year, the students are then ready
to handle some level of supervisory responsi-
bility — and in fact are given only assignments
where this is understood to be a job requisite
so that they get directtraining in leadership
through actual on-the-job decision-making.

Seniors returning from second-year field work
program have described their preparation as
"complete," and "very progressive." Perhaps
its success can be measured even better by
the response of the four alums who returned
this fall expressing enthusiasm both for their
present involvement and for the case method
as a very desirable way of making retailing
realistic. ��




Usherettes



The Promenade



Alumnae Council 1970



Lasell Alumnae Incorporated began the
Twenty-Second Annual Alumnae Council
Meetings on Friday, April 3, 1970 with a pro-
gram that included a social hour in the
New Lounge of Woodland Hall, and buffet
dinner for the class agents and secretaries
attending. Guest speaker at the dinner was
Miss Joyce Gregorian, daughter of Lasell
Trustee Mr. Arthur T. Gregorian, who gave an
informative illustrated talk on "Oriental Rugs
and the Stories They Tell," for the assembled
council delegates.

Saturday morning delegates met again to
address business matters at the Annual Meet-
ing in Wolfe Hall and outgoing President
Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 presented the gavel
to incoming President Sandra Shelton Fitch '56,
who introduced the new Board of Management.
Following a coffee break the Alumnae Career
Panel were introduced by Marjorie MacClymon
'32:



Alumnae Career Panel



Innocentia Matete '70

Unlike the four succeeding panelists, Innocentia
Matete, who completed the academic require-
ments for graduation in January and will
graduate in June, talked about her experiences
before coming to Lasell. Born in Lesotho, a
small nation formed in 1966 and located geo-
graphically in the middle of South Africa near
the Cape region, she came to America to teach
Peace Corps volunteers her native language,
Sesotho, at the Corps' language center in
California. She told council delegates some-
thing of her country and her experiences before
coming from the center to Lasell two years ago
(seep. 12).



Lois Warner '64

Group Manager at Wanamaker's newest sub-
urban branch store in King of Prussia, Pennsyl-
vania, Lois Warner talked about her career in
retailing, which started when she received her
A.S. in Retailing from Lasell. A month after
graduation she joined the executive training
program at Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and
the following May was promoted to Assistant
Buyer in the same store. The next fall, in
September 1965, she was transferred to her
present position where she is now in charge of
three sections: the fine jewelry, stationery,
and candy departments.



Helen Bonier Evans '54



Lora Green Buckingham x-'41



A graduate of the general academic program
at Lasell, Helen Evans' topic was her work in
public relations; a field she entered in 1961
when she joined Microwave Associates, an
electronics firm on Route 128 outside of
Boston, as Assistant Director of Public Rela-
tions. In 1965 she was promoted to her present
position as Director. Transferring from Mt. Ida
to Lasell in 1953, she graduated the following
year and became an editorial assistant at the
M.I.T. School of Industrial Management. Later
she spent two years as a reporter and feature
writer for the Chestnut Hill News in Phila-
delphia. She is a member of the International
Association for Industrial Editors, the Boston
Press Club, and the Public Relations Society
of America.



Barbara A. Adler '47

An administrative Assistant with the Massachu-
setts Medical Society, Barbara Adler was
featured in a recent issue of the monthly maga-
zine, Massachusetts Physician, for her work
with the Society. She was a medical secretarial
graduate in 1947, having also completed her
last year of high school work at Lasell in 1945.
Early in 1948 she took a job with the Society
on a temporary basis, and except for a brief
interval of living and working in Texas, has been
with them ever since. She told alumnae some
of her responsibilities and particular interests
within the broad range of duties encompassed
in her position.



Mrs. Buckingham is a program specialist with
the American Association of Retired Persons
and the National Retired Teachers Association
in Washington, D. C. A native of New Rochelle,
N.Y., she attended Lasell for the 1939-40
academic year, and continued her education at
the University of West Virginia before starting
her community service career as Director of
Programs for Women and Girls at the New
Rochelle YMCA. Four years later she was con-
tinuing her work with YMCA groups, again as
Program Director in Hot Springs, Arkansas, and
then went on to become Director of the
Neighborhood Senior Citizens and coordinator
of Head Start, Neighborhood Youth Corps and
Job Corps as Deputy Director of the Garland
County Economic Opportunity Council. Joining
the NRTA staff in 1967, she worked closely with
many groups active in the field of aging in the
Los Angeles area before transferring from the
NRTA West Coast Headquarters to their
Eastern Headquarters in Washington.

Describing some of the challenges and rewards
of her career thus far, she also told council
delegates about the many varied opportunities
existing for volunteers in the "Senior Power"
movement, through which older persons have
been joining together to achieve common goals
at the local, state, and national organization
levels. Speaking of her involvement with these
groups she said, "Although I've enjoyed all
ages, I'm really having a grand time now, be-
cause there are so many groovy and great
older people who respond to what I have to
offer. What more could anyone ask?"



The morning session was concluded with
questions to panelists from the floor, and
adjourned for luncheon where guest speaker
Dr. Greene was introduced and spoke to
alumnae representatives for the first time.






Dr. Greene Sees Bright Future for Lasell



"When Mrs. Fitch invited me to today's meeting,
she asked that I speak briefly on a subject of
my own choosing, and further suggested that
some of the alumnae might want to ask me
some questions — such as why I chose to come
to Lasell.

"Perhaps it would be just as well to anticipate
that question now and to start off with some of
the answers. First of all, as you know, there is
something strange about a college presidency
nowadays. Vacancies in college and university
presidencies are in evidence all over the
country — and nowhere more in evidence than
in the Boston area. There are good reasons
for this condition. The job has become some-
thing less than a sinecure. It has become risky,
frustrating, unpopular — some people even
insist, impossible. No doubt that is why when
the news of my appointment was released,
friends invariably approached me with the
same weary wit: 'Congratulations,' they would
say. 'Or should I say, condolences.'

"Apart from tiring of the joke and finding myself
increasingly unable to muster up the appro-
priate expression when I had heard the remark
for the fiftieth time, I did not feel the need of
condolences. No one was holding a gun to my
head when I decided to accept the Lasell offer.
I accepted it because I believe Lasell has a
bright future and because I feel that I can make
a positive contribution to that future.



bers is largely a life of negotiation and adver-
sary procedures. It is the administration against
the faculty or the faculty against the adminis-
tration or the students against the faculty or
one special-interest group against another.
The notion of the college as a community — as
a collection of people with common interests
in learning is disappearing from the scene.

"And I really think, as things now stand, that the
two-year college offers the best hope of re-
generating that collective spirit — largely be-
cause it has had a long tradition as a teaching
enterprise primarily and consequently has been
less mixed up in other enterprises than has
been the case with four-year colleges and uni-
versities.

"Now, I am not naive enough to view the two-
year college as a haven from all this present-day
turmoil. Certainly adversary procedures are
not absent from the Lasell community — and at
this time I am not even sure that 'community' is
an accurate descriptive word to use. Judging
from what I am told, the faculty morale could
be higher. The students are chafing, as stu-
dents usually do, under what they view as
oppressive restrictions. And the spectre of
rising costs looms over every bush and gable.

"But these are problems that can be dealt with
in rational ways, and if I did not think so I
would not be here today.



"One of my primary reasons for wanting to take
the Lasell position is that I think it will allow me
to get re-involved in education — that is, in the
work of an institution primarily concerned with
teaching. Such an involvement is becoming
more and more difficult to manage. In most
universities and four-year colleges, the life of
an administrator today or of most faculty mem-



"I am impressed by the strengths of the college.
For one thing it has an able faculty — bright,
hard-working teachers. I have met Lasell stu-
dents who transferred to Simmons, and I know
they are well taught. Not long ago a friend of
mine at one of the large universities in the
Boston area happened to remark to me that she
had been impressed by one of her students
who had transferred from Lasell and had com-
plimented the girl on her academic successes.
The student acknowledged the compliment and
said that she only wished she had encountered



8



teaching at the university as good as that she
had enjoyed at Lasell. Now, to be sure, this is
an isolated example; and someone will remind
me that it is unexamined testimony. But I do
not dismiss it as insignificant. One cannot be
in the academic profession in an area like
Greater Boston for as long as I have been with-
out developing a pretty good awareness of how
the several institutions in the area are re-
garded. And I know that Lasell is respected for
its teaching quality. Nor should we be sur-
prised to find that the quality of teaching in a
teaching institution is generally better than that
in some of our most prestigious universities,
where much of the teaching is left to graduate
assistants, whose minds are chiefly on their
own dissertations; or where some of the teach-
ing is done rather reluctantly by scholars who
would rather be spending their time in re-
search.

"One of the great failings of American higher
education, unfortunately, is the way it treats
teachers. The rewards go chiefly to the big
scholars or the clever administrators. We all
give lip-service to the notion of excellence in
teaching. But we must reward it financially.
Otherwise the spirit of the teaching faculty will
be crushed.

"We have to publicize the image of Lasell as a
fine teaching institution, and we have to keep
working on the reality to make it conform to the
image. This may mean some pruning as well as
planting. That is, it may mean cutting out some
of the deadwood so that new healthy growth
can occur. Nor do I mean this remark to apply
only to personnel. It applies just as much to
curriculum and other aspects of the college life.

"I make these remarks because by tradition the
alumnae are supposed to be conservative and
thus inclined to resist change. But in fact I
have not found this to be altogether true. I have
found that the alumnae represent a stable body
of opinion that is interested not so much in



change or no change as in the quality of change.
And therefore the alumnae body is an excellent
restraint against impulsive, unreasoned change.

"So I want to assure you that though I fully
expect to preside over changes of one kind or
another, I am not coming into office with a
determination to turn the place upside down
on the first day. As I told the students, I want to
look around very carefully. I want to listen to
people thoughtfully and get as firm an under-
standing of the problems of the college as I
can before I start pressing for changes.

"Meanwhile I intend to practice forbearance.
Keeping one's cool, as it is called in some
quarters. And I expect that you will have to
practice forbearance too. We cannot lose sight
of the fact that the students are younger than
we are. Their interests will be different from
yours and mine; thejr compulsive drives will be
different. Their 'life styles,' to use a modish
phrase, will differ from ours. As a result, they
will be pressing for changes of which many of
you will disapprove. Already their social free-
dom far exceeds anything that many of you
dreamed of when you were in college. And they
will want to extend the limits even further.

"I do not say that my policies will be repressive,
though they may seem so to some; or permis-
sive, though they will certainly seem so to
others. I will try always to act in the best inter-
ests of the college — the college as a whole
community. And to act intelligently in this in-
terest I have to have contact with all the parts
of the whole, and to incorporate or assimilate
into decision-making the reasoned wills of
these parts. Consequently, I will be depending
upon you for assistance; your knowledge of the
institution will be indispensable to me; your
support will, as always, be indispensable to
the college."



— Alumnae Council Luncheon,

April 4, 1970




The Lasell Medallion



The Lasell Alumnae Inc. Board of Management
voted this year to make the annual presenta-
tion of Lasell Medallions during Alumnae Coun-
cil rather than at Reunion in June. Presenting
the five 1970 medallions for Lasell Alumnae
Inc., President Sandra Sheldon Fitch '56 said:
"For the third year, Lasell Alumnae Incorpo-
rated is privileged to honor alumnae and
friends of the College, who, and I quote from
the Medallion inscription, 'have added dis-
tinction to the name of Lasell.'



Helen Carter Johnson '07 (In Absentia)

"Helen Carter Johnson came to Lasell Semi-
nary in 1902 from Hastings, Minnesota; was
graduated in 1907. She furthered her studies
at the University of Chicago; decided to write
advertising.

"In 1917 a group of twenty-two women in the
advertising field — a not too familiar category
for women at that time — met at the Chicago
College Club. As a result — in November of that
year, the Women's Advertising Club of Chicago
was founded with Helen Carter as its first
president. The group celebrated its 50th Anni-
versary in 1967; its membership now exceeds
200 and includes presidents of agencies and
advertisers, as well as top executives in every
phase of communications.

"Mrs. Johnson's involvement in civic and com-
munity affairs are many; special concern being
given to the Infant Welfare Society of Chicago
and the nationally-known Lighthouse for the
Blind. Her interest and pleasure in helping the
progress of young people is pointed out in the
numerous scholarships she has sponsored and
supported. Friends, the Women's Athletic Club,
and Monday duplicate bridge games are her
chief social activities.

"We are extremely sorry that Mrs. Johnson's
health does not permit her to join us today.
Lasell Junior College and Lasell Alumnae, In-
corporated are proud of Helen Carter Johnson
and are grateful for this opportunity to recog-
nize a stimulating person, who maintains a zest
for life and a desire to serve her fellow-man.



Wilder N. Smith (In Absentia)

"Wilder N. Smith first became interested in
Lasell when, as a young Gilchrist office man-
ager, he began to accompany his wife, Antoin-
ette Meritt Smith '23 to Alumnae meetings.

"Mr. Smith, a graduate of the College of Busi-
ness Administration at Boston University, has
spent his entire business career with the Gil-
christ Company, a Boston based department
store chain. He was Treasurer, Director and
Comptroller of the Company; served also as
treasurer of its employee credit union until the
time of his retirement in the fall of 1969.

"He was elected to the Board of Trustees of
Lasell Junior College in 1950; named Chairman
of the Board in May 1962. During his twelve-
year term as Trustee, he served as Vice Presi-
dent of the Lasell Corporation and a member of
the Finance Committee.

"The Smiths reside on Woodland Road in Au-
burndale and have enjoyed vacationing each
winter in Florida. Unfortunately they did not
think it wise to return from the South in early
April. We can heartily agree that enjoying the
warm Sarasota sunshine, walking along the
beach, playing shuffleboard and golf certainly
sound far more appealing than enduring this
week's abundance of sleet, snow and cold
wind.

"Upon his retirement as Chairman of the Board,
we wish to say thank you for a job most well
done. It is a distinct privilege for Lasell Alum-
nae Incorporated to award a Medallion to this
loyal and devoted friend who has given so un-
tiringly of himself to promote and sustain the
good name of Lasell.

Mr. and Mrs. Smith will continue to serve on
the College Board of Trustees; we extend sin-
cere affectionate wishes for a fulfilling and
comfortable retirement.

Madeline Farmer Ryder x-'15

"It was fortunate for the Alumnae Association
that Madeline Farmer Ryder decided to follow
the pattern of her mother, the late Mary Walker
Farmer, and attend Lasell.



"Wife of the late Paul Ryder, and mother of
Pauline and Paul, Jr., Mrs. Ryder, a long-time
resident of Waltham, has taken an active part
in community and church affairs. The Lexing-
ton Chapter of the D.A.R. and Lasell continue
to receive her interest and support. As an
active worker in the Waltham Girl Scouts, her
training in nature still prevails. She lends a
hand to conserve the wild life by feeding the 45
to 80 ducks which frequent her back yard.

"Mrs. Ryder is a member of the Greater Boston
Lasell Club, is Fund Chairman for the Class of
1915; has served Lasell Alumnae, Incorporated
in various capacities; for a number of years
opened her home for a Spring Tea to benefit
the Alumnae Building Fund. It is a genuine
pleasure to award a medallion to this devoted
and loyal alumna.



"In June 1969 the Seminar Room of the new
library was dedicated in memory of her hus-
band. It is with great pride that Lasell Alumnae,
Incorporated awards a Medallion to Virginia
Ogden Hayes for her continued interest in and
support of the College.



June Babcock

"May we share with you a portion of this recent
letter from Acting President June Babcock:
'Dear Alums: I am deeply touched and very
humbled by your decision to award me a Lasell
Medallion. For twenty-eight years the College
has been the center of my life and I have be-
come increasingly involved in its problems.
Many of the students whom I taught have be-
come my dear friends, and more and more I
feel myself an alumna of Lasell.'



Virginia Ogden Hayes '33

"Virginia Ogden Hayes was graduated from
Lasell Junior College with the Class of 1933.
When a first year resident student at Old Wood-
land Park, she was most impressed by the
training and teachings of the late Mrs. Statira
McDonald. These influences have greatly ap-
preciated over the years.

"Mrs. Hayes has been an active member of the
firm of C. I. Hayes, Inc. of Cranston, Rhode
Island. Her late husband founded the business,
fulfilling his dream to build furnaces for indus-
trial use with electric current. Carl Irving Hayes
was President-Treasurer at the time of his
death in 1965; Mrs. Hayes has succeeded him
in that capacity.

"Mrs. Hayes is the proud mother of Alice and
Carl, Jr.; adoring grandmother of Wendy Alice
Barrows. She has always been interested in
Masonic and church activities, and politics.
While she has never held political office, she
has been a hard-working vote-getter for favorite
candidates. Mrs. Hayes has held high offices
in the Order of Rainbow and Eastern Star; is
past and current chairman of numerous com-
mittees of the Edgewood Congregational
Church. Her leisure time is spent reading,
enjoying music and traveling.



"June Babcock was graduated magna cum
laude from Taunton, Massachusetts High
School, cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from
Wheaton College, and holds a Master of Arts
degree from Cornell University. Before coming
to Lasell, Miss Babcock was a member of the
faculty of Kents Hill School in Readfield, Maine
and of the Grier School, Tyrone, Pennsylvania.
Since 1942 Miss Babcock has worn many hats
at Lasell — instructor, assistant dean, dean of
Women and twice has been called upon to
serve as Acting President of the College.

"Life at Lasell is extremely busy and allows
little time for community activities. Miss Bab-
cock is currently serving her ninth year as a
successful Class Agent for Wheaton College.
She and her handsome yellow cat, Dennis M.
Babcock, reside at 70 Maple Street — the small
stucco house beside Winslow Hall. Her leisure
hours are spend sewing and traveling.

"It is indeed a privilege and pleasure for Lasell
Alumnae Incorporated to award a Medallion to
so devoted and dedicated a member of the
Lasell Family; to one who has shown great
tolerance and understanding in her years of
service." ��




Innocentia being interviewed by Roy Lind on WNTN Newton Radio in January
this year.



From Lesotho to Lasell



The youngest member of the Career Panel at
Alumnae Council this year, Innocentia Matete
70, from Lesotho, came to Lasell by a circu-
itous route leading from Africa through the
Peace Corps language center in San Diego,
and back to the East Coast. When she re-
ceives her associate degree in June, she will
probably have the distinction too of being one
of the most interviewed foreign students to
graduate from Lasell, having appeared before
numerous student and civic groups to talk
about her country, which at a scant four years
of age, is one of the newest nations in the
south of Africa. At the end of the first semester
this year she was also interviewed on Newton
Radio where she told how she happened to
come to Lasell and what some of her plans
were for the future.

As she explained, the first step to her further
education here came three years ago when she
applied for scholarship aid from her govern-
ment to study abroad. While waiting to hear
from the authorities, she learned instead that
her government had nominated her for a U.S.
Peace Corps project, teaching the Lesotho
language, Sesotho, to young volunteers at the
California language center.



Before long she and fifteen other new teachers
were jet-bound for San Diego, via New York
City. Describing the Peace Corps experience,
Innocentia added that while New York had
surprised them with its overwhelming size,
teaching with the Peace Corps held some sur-
prises of its own. The first was making their
initial encounter with their students at the air-
port, where the Corps had arranged to have them
meet and return to the center together by bus.
During the ride, as during the remainder of the
program, teachers were to use no English what-
ever, although as a second language taught
since grade school in Lesotho, it would have
been the most natural aid to communication.
So, while introductions were cumbersome, be-
fore the end of the bus ride students were able
to understand and were responding in English
to simple questions put to them by their now
slightly more seasoned teachers.

The pace thus set, it was sustained over a six-
month period of what Innocentia described as
both a challenging and exhausting experience.
Using neither translation nor written words,
they worked with groups of six to eight students
each in intensive all-day sessions of conversa-
tional instruction. At the end of two or three
months a few of the one hundred volunteers
starting the program could express themselves
in sentences; at the end of six months, seventy
were graduated from the program, ready to
begin work in Lesotho. Even for those especially
gifted in learning new languages, Innocentia
added, it was a particularly difficult assignment
since Sesotho contains many clicks and hard
sounds that have no counterpart in most West-
ern tongues. The sounds even vary so much
between languages in southern Africa alone,
where there are 286 of them, that it is difficult
for people in one country to understand the
languages used in their closest neighboring
country.

Next in the chain of events leading Innocentia
to Lasell was correspondence between former
President Vincent De Baun and Lesotho Am-
bassador A. S. Mohale in Washington, which
brought her to Auburndale in February of 1968.
Aside from a confrontation with immigration
officials who arrived during her first final
exams to announce that her visa had termi-
nated with her Peace Corps work and to
threaten deportation, she says she has found
her two years in the general academic program



12



at Lasell very pleasant and rewarding. Enjoy-
ing the proximity of Newton to Boston, which
she visits about once a week, and her friends
here, she decided to transfer this February for
the second two-year leg of her education as a
junior majoring in political science at Newton
College of the Sacred Heart. Now 23, she
hopes to be able to complete the requirements
for a degree in law after obtaining a B.A. and
then return to her home in Maseru, the capital
of Lesotho, to contribute in some way to her
country's development, perhaps through
politics.

The most urgent long-range problem facing
the government of Lesotho presently, she says,
is education. Since there is now only one uni-
versity, students leave their high school pro-
gram with a strong background in math or
health sciences, but without either the techni-
cal skills for a trade, or reasonable hope of
further advanced study, or, therefore, any
choice about their future. As a result, many
students go to neighboring African countries
to continue their education, and understand-
ably many also remain there to work. While the
present government has pledged itself to raise
the capital necessary to extend the level of
existing education, it is still a slow and arduous
task for a young nation crowded with priorities.

Political independence, first from South Africa,
in which Lesotho sits, as Innocentia puts it,
"like the hole in the doughnut," and second
from Great Britain, whose protectorate she was
until 1966, established Lesotho then, for the
first time, as a democracy. Since that time the
economy has expanded; new transportation
systems have been constructed. But the major
products: wool, diamonds, and electricity are
presently the only economic complements to
the primarily agrarian society. Located in the
heart of the area comprising the southern tip
of Africa, the nation of about one million people
remains scattered in the low lands and moun-
tainous regions that together total approxi-
mately 1 1 ,900 square miles, or roughly the size
of the state of Maryland. Aiding in economic
development, the Peace Corps continues to
provide educational and community develop-
ment assistance to support the present eco-
nomic framework, lending technical or engi-
neering leadership in building water systems,
and teaching such subjects as biology and
English in secondary schools.



Beyond their own boundaries, Lesotho and
other new nations in Africa continue to fight
for economic autonomy by working together
and pooling their limited resources in a spirit
of unity and cooperation. But, while neither ex-
ternal nor internal disunity, such as that within
Nigeria, is a major inhibiting problem for most
of these countries, getting recognition and
cooperation from the larger, more powerful
nations frequently is.

Asked about the opportunities that might exist
for her to make a contribution to her country's
development, should she return with a law
degree as she hopes, Innocentia did say that
she believes the role of politician, even that of
Prime Minister, to be a natural one for a
woman; that it is really a question of accep-
tance by the people. ��




13



From the Campus



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*








Minnie and Winston Churchill chat informally with students after his lecture in
October.



Concert and

Lecture

Series



Leading off the Concert/ Lecture Series
program for 1969-70 was Winston S. Churchill,
grandson and namesake of the late Sir Winston,
who, at 28, is a noted author and a reporter
for the BBC whose reputation as a journalist
was firmly established with his coverage of the
Biafran civil war in March 1969. Still deeply
concerned with the Biafran problem when he
visited Lasell on October 15, he suggested
to his audience, some of whom had just
returned from a day of marching in protest to
the Vietnamese war, that all of the four major
crisis areas in the world today, including
Czechoslovakia, Biafra, the Middle East, and
Vietnam require U.S. attention, to the exclusion
of no one of them. He added that he hoped
the present mood in America "did not herald a
new era of isolationism, because no country in
this day and age can be an island to itself,
particularly not the greatest and most powerful
nation in the world."



Speaking to a capacity audience in Winslow
Hall, Mr. Churchill then focussed on "The
Continuing Crisis in the Middle East," first
describing the major events of the 1967 six-day
Arab-Israeli War as he witnessed them,
then highlighting the historical bases for the
multilateral viewpoints in the Middle East
today. An informal discussion between Mr.
Churchill and students followed at a reception




'Doc" and Merle Watson in Winslow Hall, February 11



at the President's House where he explored a
full range of topics from world politics to
student concerns on both sides of the Atlantic.

On Tuesday, Nov. 11, the college was host to
the second guest in the series, pianist
Agustin Anievas, whose program included his
much lauded recordings from the Works of
Chopin and Brahms. In the first half of the pro-
gram were the Twelve Etudes, Opus 10 of
Chopin, and four Chopin Waltzes. After inter-
mission he concluded with Brahms' Variations
and Fugue on a Theme of Handel which he
recorded recently for Seraphim.

Then, on February 11, Country and Western,
Folk, Blues, and Bluegrass singer and
guitar picker "Doc" Watson and his son Merle
received a standing ovation for their
performance of familiar songs, guitar pieces,
original numbers, and adaptations of other
melodies. Campus enthusiasm ran high as The
Lasell News said of the evening, "This
concert had to be one of the best, as far as
both talent and audience attendance are
concerned, that the school has ever had."
A reception in Winslow Hall was held after the
performance.

The last guest of the College in the 1969-70
Series was Julian Bond, member of the Georgia
State legislature and nominee for the vice-
presidency at the 1968 Democratic Convention
in Chicago. Again quoting from The Lasell
News, "On April 15th, removed from the riots
of Cambridge, Lasell's largest audience this
year gathered to hear the Honorable Julian
Bond (Independent-Georgia) speak on the New
Coalition. Those who were expecting a
rehash of the Chicago Convention were sorely
disappointed for Mr. Bond spoke quietly,
humorously, and eloquently."



In explaining his views, Mr. Bond touched on
the broad issues of freedom and inequality
underlying the position of the Negro in society
today, the influence of black leaders to date
upon that position, and what he called the
"political victimization" of the black commu-
nity. Summing up these problems and frustra-
tions he quoted Frederick Douglass who
assigned both their cause and the source of a
cure to the character of the nation as a whole.
He closed with a lively question-answer period
and added that on a college campus we really
don't see it all happening and have no real
idea of what it all means — to which the
audience rose in a standing ovation. ��




Julian Bond answered more questions for students and faculty at
the President's House following his appearance on campus April 15.



Clubs



New Hampshire

Saturday, May 2, a luncheon arranged by
Sandi Perkins Jones '65 was held at the New
Hampshire Highway Motel in Concord. The
club voted a most generous contribution to
the Alumnae Fund for the pool.

Rhode Island

The annual meeting of the Rhode Island club
was held at the Ramada Inn in Seekonk,
Mass. on Wednesday, May 6. President of
the chapter, Nancy Hartnett Lohnes x-'55
presided. One of the honored guests at the
meeting was 1970 Medallion winner Virginia
Ogden Hayes.

Fairfield County

Following a short business meeting in AprH
at the home of Mrs. William Keith, Mrs.
Charles Shepard of Boston presented her
collection of International bells to alumnae
in this area. They designated Tuesday,
June 2, for their annual spring dinner.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh area alumnae enjoyed a bridge
luncheon on May 18 at the home of Betty
Yeuell Collins '38. Proceeds will be directed
to the Alumnae Fund for the pool.

Greater Boston

One of the most delightful afternoons in a
long time was the revival of the spring lun-
cheon sponsored by the Greater Boston
Lasell Club. Over seventy-five alumnae and
guests gathered on Saturday, May 16 at the
Holiday Inn in Waltham for the luncheon and
fashion show arranged by the club. At the
head table were honored guests Dr. and Mrs.
Kenneth M. Greene, and Madeline Farmer
Ryder. Senior retailing students served as
models for outfits supplied by local manu-
facturers, and Dr. Charles Barry, Chairman
of the Retailing Department was also present.




Seated at the head table for the Greater Boston Lasell Club luncheon and fashion show were,
from left to right: Edith Taccone Kearney x-'51 , club treasurer; Director of Development, James
Stanley; Mrs. Greene; Joy Stewart Rice '55, vice-president; Barbara Cole French, president;
Dr. Greene; Marjorie MacClymon '32; and Madeline Farmer Ryder x-'15.




Seen here with friends of '68 were, on the left: Dr. Barry; Chris White
'70; and center front: Judy Yee '68, left; and Eltha Mae Phillibert
'68, right.





Watching the fashions were also, clockwise from the left: Lillian G.
Bethel '28; Sandra Shelton Fitch '56 and guest; Linda Telfer '60; Mar-
jorie Lovering Harris '22; and Linda Nolin Ahearn '55, second from right.



Also at the Boston luncheon were, clockwise from the left: Carolyn
Duncan Long '27; Esther T. Josselyn '27; Joan Kearney Cormay '51;
Barbara Ordway Brewer '35; Barbara Iris Johnson '35; Mrs. Olive
Winterhalter, former staff; Mildred Bell Cole '31; guest; Carol Healey
Butterworth '61 ; and Lee Pool Langley '46.






Conference, Language Rooms Open in Library




Three new rooms were in full use this year
the first time on the ground floor of the librf
Dedicated last spring, they were given by t*
alumnae and a trustee of the college.



The Hayes Seminar Room, given in memory of
Carl I. Hayes by his wife Virginia Ogden Hayes
'33, was scheduled with daily seminars through-
out the year.







The Frances A. Levenson Language Center
the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Levenson (Fr;
ces Angel '22).



|




Reserved for meetings of the Board of
Trustees, special faculty committees, and
official college entertaining, the Gregorian
Room is the gift of Trustee Arthur T. Gregorian.



Class Notes*



'99



Elise Scott Mackintosh has en-
joyed a unique hobby — "raised and
sold capons from 1919 until World
War II."

'03

"Lasell helped me to find myself;
I enjoyed it all — made many long-
time friends" writes Lucia Parcher
Dow x-'03. Now confined to her Cam-
bridge home because of a broken
hip, and no longer able to spend the
winter months at Lauderdale Beach
Hotel, Lucia enjoys frequent visits
with son, John, four grandchildren
and eight great-grandchildren.

'05

From Hazel Carey Adam: "Married
in 1906 to Folger Adam; he died in
February 1964. We had four children
— lost a son in World War II. My two
married daughters live near me in
Joliet (III.). I have five great-grand-
children; the oldest, 14, is a student
at Exeter Academy."

Dorothea Turner Moulton is at Har-
bor Home, York Harbor, Maine.

Sarah H. Strong has added "ama-
teur photography to her list of favor-
ite hobbies."

In October at the Chicago Center,
Mary-Florine Thielens Peeples pre-
sented a program, "Highlights of a
World Tour." This entertainment in-
cluded her comment on countries she
visited this year and in the past,
color movies and a display of dolls,
fans, shawls, and statues she has
collected over the years.



'07

Clara Nims, retired children's Li-
brarian (Watertown, N.Y.), now re-
sides at 650 W. Harrison Avenue,
Claremont, Calif. With classmate,
Lilian Douglass Heeb, she was
"among those present" at the March
Luncheon of the Southern California
Club.

Margherita Dike Hallberg is living
in Laguna Hills, California. She thor-
oughly enjoys the fine weather and
the freedom community living pro-
vides. The pictures of her grandchil-
dren are darling.

I continue to use a walker or wheel-
chair. Nell (Woodward Collins '15)
has been with me during the winter
months. I have never known anyone
with more understanding, kindness
and abilities.

JO WOODWARD RAND



'11

Kathleen Moore Knight is now re-
tired and devoting her time — at the
moment — to the restoration and mod-
ernization of a 150-year-old house
in Vineyard Haven.

Pauline Orcutt Hemenway's chief
interests are her family — six adults
and nine grandchildren. Pauline's
current address is 3905 Amherst
Street, Dallas, Texas.

Elinor Ryan Hixenbaugh, retired
from the Ohio Department of Public
Welfare, has helped to organize the
Brevard County Council on Aging
and serves on their Board. Elinor's
"retirement" address is: 144 West
Alachua Lane, Cocoa Beach, Florida.



'13

Wilhelmina Joscelyn Swett now
lives at Wesley Willows, a Methodist
Retirement Home in Rockford (III.).
She continues to use her musical
training — is organist at the Home's
chapel. One of her granddaughters,
a music major, will be graduated
from Northwestern University this
year. She has played with the Chi-
cago Opera for two seasons; plans
to follow a musical career.

Mrs. Priscilla Davis thoughtfully
forwards an address for her mother,
Eleanor Smith Dean x-'13 — Natchaug
Hospital and Nursing Home, Mans-
field, Conn.

'17

Lenette Rogers Atkinson, former
secretary of the American Fern So-
ciety, has had several scientific ar-
ticles published on ferns. In past
years she travelled extensively in the
U.S., Europe, South Africa and Aus-
tralia.

'21

Katharine Van Fleet brings us up-
to-date: "Have held various secre-
tarial positions covering about forty-
five years of service, including five
years as secretary to the Mayor of
Toledo, many years as secretary to
a Cleveland attorney; later did free
lance secretarial work assisting in
the preparation of manuscripts for
publication. Have taken private les-
sons in silversmithing and have had
articles accepted for display in
Cleveland May's Show."



* Because the volume of class notes for this issue far exceeds the avail-
able space, news from odd-numbered classes only will appear here,
while even-numbered class news will be included in the summer issue.



The drawings in this section were made by Jean Alice Segaloff '67
whose renditions of campus landmarks first appeared in the 1967 Lamp,
of which she was Art Director. After her graduation, in February 1968,
she added many of the drawings here to the campus collection for a
special Development Office project, which coincided with a one-month
show in Carpenter of mixed media paintings and other pen and ink
drawings.




New Dorm



1<<




Clark

Florence Mann Matzek has joined
the Florida contingent: 3319 Spring
Mill Circle, Sarasota.

Marion Bodwell Lesher has "many
fond memories of my time at Lasell
— enjoyed the music groups, the
nearness of Boston — the opportunity
to enjoy concerts, opera and the
theatre. And how I loved Crew!"

'23

Volunteer and community services
provide a more than busy schedule
for Anna Bullock Thornton. She is
associated with the Community Work-
shops of Rhode Island; has served
on the Corporation of both the Rhode
Island and Butler Hospitals; devotes
much time to Red Cross activities.

Frances Witker Lauer retired in
June '68 after twenty-two years of
affiliation with the Detroit Public
School system.

'25

Miriam Berkson Hoover has retired
from Chatham College in Pittsburgh,
but continues her interest in the field
of Renaissance and Baroque music.
She is credited with two books, pub-
lished for children — "Recorder Fin-
gering Book" and "The Recorder
Music Reader". Miriam now lives at
258 East Streetsboro, Hudson, Ohio.

Also retired is Blanche Avery.
While a Home Economics teacher in
Poughkeepsie, New York, Blanche
was president of the Dutchess County



Teachers Association and a member
of numerous state committees. Cur-
rently she does volunteer work at a
local hospital; enjoys her favorite
hobby — oil painting. Her summer
vacations are spent on the Maine
coast.

'27

Edith Bronstein Silverman has re-
cently retired as Treasurer and Man-
ager of Fenmore Apartments Inc. of
Boston. She is now devoting her
"spare time" to three grandchildren.

Edith Thorpe VanDine is a special
service clerk in the Alumni Records
Office at Yale University.

In 1968 Elinor Day Conley retired
from the Boston Public Library sys-
tem. She set up the Library at Boston
University College of General Educa-
tion when it first opened in 1946, and
served as head librarian for two
years. She now serves, on a volunteer
basis, in the Charlestown High
School Library.

Barbara Tait Brooks and husband
have been actively interested in the
Eastern States Exposition for 40
years. Barbara, this year, is co-chair-
man of the Eastern States Horse
Show.

Christine Oby Jones now divides
her time between Canton, Ohio and
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. She and her
husband are boating enthusiasts.



'29

An early reply to the 1970 Alumnae
Fund appeal:

Indeed I remember the Natatorium,
but not as an object of ridicule — far
from it! You see, my Mother was
Mrs. S. P. McDonald, whom you may
remember as the Dean of the old
Woodland Park! Before that, she was
the "preceptress" of Woodland Park
School in which I spent my child-
girlhood, 1918-1928. At that time, we
were well taught that Lasell Semi-
nary was the first girl's school to have
(1) a domestic science department
and (2) a swimming pool, both of
which were objects of great pride.

We children were allowed the use
of the pool on Saturday mornings,
which was one of the big days of our



week. To begin with, we were allowed
to buy twenty cents worth of penny
candy, spread out in five-pound boxes
on one of the billiard tables in the
Casino. This was to last us all week
and therefore, decisions were made
not lightly and more consistent with
quantity than quality. Of course, we
ate it all, walking through the woods
and down Woodland Road to Brag-
don, our towels under our arms and
our hearts gay, for this was our only
free venture during the week. Only
one trial had to be endured — the
town youngsters who sat on the
stone wall below Billings (?) dangling
their feet and hurling epithets at us,
such as "Woodland Park Bums, yah
yah" as we scuttled past. And so we
arrived at the pool, half sick with
chocolate and righteous indignation.

I cannot forget that warm, damp,
oppressive air, smelling strongly of
mildewed bathing suits, rubber bath-
ing caps and spongy wood; but after
the first movement, we hardly no-
ticed, and jostled one another for
favorite cubicles to change in. While
this process was going on, we sang
at full strength "Coming down from
Bangor, in a Pullman train" etc. and
other gems of musical inspiration and
then with shouts of "Last one in's a
rotten egg", flopped into the murky
depths.

We were fortunate in our super-
visors and one in particular, a Miss
Boynton, a stocky girl who impressed
us no end because she knew Ger-
trude Ederle, the first woman to swim
the Channel. She managed to teach
us to love and respect water and
introduced us to the intricacies of
the Australian Crawl, forerunner of
today's familiar stroke, which was
just coming into vogue then. She
organized Meets and coached us in
diving, an activity from which I still
bear the marks, having gashed my
hand, bloodily and dramatically, on
some sinister object on the hidden
bottom.

It was always a cold trip back to
Woodland — after two hot sodden
hours, our hair wet, sinuses and ears
full of water, throats sore, muscles
weary, but with an overwhelming
feeling of relaxation and well-being.

I have a cottage now on the edge
of a cliff overlooking the Northumber-



land Straits, where I go for two
months each summer. There I swim
every day and enjoy the same won-
derful feeling, but with a difference
— no chocolate, no singing, no indig-
nation and not nearly as much fun!
Enclosed is a small contribution — it
is not really for the new Olympic-size,
chlorinated beauty abutting the esker
— it is in gratitude and affection for
Saturday mornings at the old pool.
Gwendolyn McDonald Black
Mrs. J. L. Black
Middle Sackville
New Brunswick, Canada

Mary Thomas Neal is Treasurer of
Gift Fund — a home for neglected and
dependent children of Edgar County

(III-).

Eleanor Pitcher Hansen's Granville
(Mass.) home, built in 1795, was open
to a house-tour in the fall. Eleanor
spends the winter months in Kendall,
Florida.

Elizabeth Palmer Bedell x-'29 is
Chairman of the Language Depart-
ment at the North Middlesex Region-
al School in Pepperell (Mass.).

Frances Boothby Sylvester x-'29 is
now permanently residing at R.F.D.
#3, Scarborough, Maine.

'31

Norma Keller Coulthart, husband
and three sons — Stephen, Laurence




and William — live at 4922 Hill Road,
R.D. 2, Oneida, New York.

Mary O'Connell wasn't exactly
given $1 million on Sunday, January
4, 1970. But she came as close to it
as most people ever will. Miss O'Con-
nell, Somerset's chief Dietitian, for
the past 24 years, had a portion of
the hospital's new $1 million wing
dedicated in her honor. The section
of the hospital that now officially
"belongs" to Miss O'Connell — as it
has unofficially since 1946 — is the
spacious new dietary department,
which is in the final stages of com-
pletion.

The Administrator of Somerset
Hospital (Somerville, N. J.) is Nelson
O. Lindley, husband of Priscilla
Chappie '40.

Mary Morgan Schulhof and daugh-
ter, Sharon, attended the Southern
California Luncheon in March. Mary
contributes this bit of personal news:
"My son has a scholarship at
Boston U. and a Teaching Fellowship
at the Marine Lab at Woods Hole. He
received his MA from Fullerton State
College in Marine Biology last June
and worked at the Smithsonian Insti-
tute in Washington, D. C. during the
summer. He is so much enjoying his
experience of living on Cape Cod —
a winter in New England is another
new experience. He did spend 18
months on the 32nd Parallel in Korea
— and experienced his share of bitter
cold there."

"Would love to have had Sharon
attend Lasell — but finances and
distance deemed it necessary to
attend a State College in California.
I find life almost too full — and con-
stant new challenges — having New
Horizons with the installation of our
new GE-600 Computer."

"Either I need longer weeks ... or
longer weekends . . . look forward to
a time when I might have a little more
time for myself, and to enjoy my
friends. My husband has a travel
office (one of the oldest on the west
coast) and it necessitates his travel
to keep up contacts and have first-
hand info for his customers. I have
had some fabulous experiences and
seen parts of the world I never would
have dreamed of — but it has been at
a fast pace . . . with little time, even




Chandler

after returning home, to enjoy in
retrospect."

"My best regards to any who re-
member me — Helen Beede '21, Miss
McClelland, and my dear friend, Lil
Bethel '28."

Dorothy Peabody Hayman now
lives at 209 Murray Drive, Doyles-
town, Pa. She continues her interest
in painting and dancing.

Ruth Rohe Smith lists as her
"favorite" hobby — "breeding cham-
pion Basenjies". Barbara Pearce
Keach has a similar interest — breed-
ing and raising American bred cocker
spaniels.

Jane Filstrup Totzke x-'31 is Direc-
tor of a new high-rise dormitory at
Ferris State College, Big Rapids,
Mich.



'33

We extend sympathy to Helen
Burwell whose mother, Mrs. Jessie
Crone Burwell, died on February 15,
1970. Mrs. Burwell was retired from
the Hartford (Conn.) public school
system.

Emeline Walker Fatherley x-'33
and family enjoy their vacation home
in Bradford, Vt.

Marjorie Shetland Bates forwards
her "new retirement" address — 732
Coral Way, Coral Gables, Fla.

Louise Cenedella Kidd contributes
much time to volunteer services in a
local hospital. Louise's address is
185 Hillside Road, Southbridge, Mass.
The family summers in East Hampton,
Long Island.

Sybil Thomas Ryder x-'33 declares:
"My first love is music. I'm a mem-
ber of the Brockton Symphony
Orchestra."



21



Class Secretary Ruth Stafford
Clark attended the 1970 Annual
Alumnae Council Session; shortly
thereafter sent the following: "Hearty
congratulations to our own Lasell
Medallion winner, Virginia Ogden
Hayes. This honor was given to
Virginia on April 4, 1970 at the
Alumnae Council Luncheon in recog-
nition of her continuing interest in the
College and for successfully carrying
on and expanding the C. I. Hayes
Company as president and treasurer,
following her husband's death in
1965. Through Virginia's generosity
and loyalty, a seminar room in the
new Library has been given in mem-
ory of her late husband, Carl I. Hayes.

"At the Annual Meeting of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc. we learned that
Shirley Gould Chesebro has been
re-elected to the Board of Manage-
ment. Another important interest in
Shirley's life is the arrival of her
third grandchild, Robert Alan Chese-
bro III, in December 1969."

'35

Frances Findlay Hall's "time is
occupied with the Dog Game. We
breed, raise and show Irish Wolf-
hounds."

Ann Cobb x-'35 is now Mrs. E. W.
Comstock of 69 Mountain Avenue,
Bayville, N. Y.

Janice Piper Bonacquist is Public
Information Specialist for the New
York State Department of Health in
Albany.

Margaret Lane Packard x-'35 is
Branch Librarian for the Town of
Needham (Mass.). Her chief hobby
is hand weaving, which she learned
under the supervision of the late
Myra L. Davis '95-'97.

Dorothy Kelley MacNaughton is
Manager of the Stenographic depart-
ment at Monarch Life Insurance Com-
pany, Springfield (Mass.). The Past-
president of the Springfield Chapter,
National Secretaries Association, she
is currently Membership Chairman
for that group.

Virginia Hanscom Draper x-'35 and
husband enjoy fishing, boating and



swimming — all easily accessible to
their South Hamilton (Mass.) home.
Last winter's vacation was spent in
Florida — they were particularly inter-
ested in bird-watching in the Ever-
glades and Key West.

'37

Jean Pratt Bain is employed as
Executive Secretary in Framingham's
Shoppers' World Inc.

Marjorie Hills Buffington has re-
turned from an early winter trip to
Tahiti and neighboring islands.

Dorothy Abbott Atherton is Con-
sulting Dietician at the Lakes Region
Convalescent Center in Laconia,
N. H.

Barbara Fowler Hoyt is Civic
Service Director of Rosemary Hall,
Greenwich, Conn.

Ruth Buchanan Lenart has three
daughters. The eldest, Victoria, is a
member of the Class of 1970 at the
University of Colorado.

Deborah Sweet King, an elemen-
tary art teacher in Woonsocket, R. I.,
is a member of the State Contempo-
rary Craft Center, the American Craft
Council and of the R. I. Art Teachers
Association.

Beverly Rice x-'37 was recently
retired from her duties at Yale Uni-
versity. She was the Graduate Place-
ment Secretary for the Department
of Economics.




^^^r^r^ ,





Pickard



Berkeley



Lois Tracy Rix x-'37 has "estab-
lished a Public Stenography office in
my home where I am busy all the
time, working with college faculties,
students, attorneys and translators in
preparation of college textbooks,
monographs, doctoral dissertations,
bachelor's and master's degrees
(theses) and research papers."

'39

Jeanne Daniels Wheeler antici-
pates a change of address later this
year. Her husband will assume the
Vice-Presidency of the State Bank of
Albany.

Janet Norton Sonstroem is Trea-
surer of Norton Enterprises, Bristol,
Conn.

Marie Dunston Murray is a volun-
teer driver for a totally blind Reha-
bilitation Teacher in Panama City,
Florida.

Sue Cunningham Woodruff main-
tains an interest in the Children's
Theatre group of Charleston, W. Va.
Vacations are spent at the family's
farm in the nearby mountains.

Marjorie Woodrough Gay.'s spare
time is devoted to archaeological
projects. She is a past worthy matron
of the Eastern Star. Marjorie's pres-
ent address is: Standing Rock, Ala-
bama.

Marian Traxler Crum devotes three
days each week to Volunteer Service
in Los Angeles hospitals.

Ruth Kingsley Lape has two daugh-
ters and two sons; Patricia Ann, 28;
Robert L., 24; James Merrill, 18; j
Linda Cay, 10.



Virginia Thomas Baxter forwards a
new address: 10001 Tulip Street,
Penellas Park, Fla.

Jean Michael Petersen comments:
"It seemed that Lasell had perhaps
more "traditions" during the era
when I knew it best, than many other
Junior Colleges. Hopefully, they will
not all be abandoned in the interests
of updating and modernizing campus
procedures."

'41

Ginny DeNyse shares Christmas
notes:

From Nancy Maguire Mackinnon:
"Welly (Dorothy Welch Taylor) came
East to visit a friend in Darien; she,
and Sue Cairoli Peck came for lunch
— had I known sooner, I would have
included you and Jean Cooney Leitch.
Welly plans to come again in the
summer — we'll get together then.
Incidentally, her Darien friend is
married to Vicki Muehlberg Warner's
(x-'42) brother."

From Ann Preuss Gillerlain: "Our
Debbie is engaged to a wonderful
boy — a graduate student at Syracuse;
they will be married late next sum-
mer. Mike graduates in June, and we
are hoping the draft will not take
over. I keep busy doing volunteer
work."

From Louise Lorion DeVries: "We
have a third grandchild on the way
via Pete and Lori — their daughters





Blaisdell



Draper

are now five and two; I enjoy them
so much. Doug, 23, is at UCLA grad-
uate school; Jim, 22, is a senior at
Westmont and will be married in
June. Pat, who was married last year,
is a secretary. I am teaching nursery
school in the mornings, and continu-
ing college courses in pre-school
education. We had a delightful
month's vacation in Canada this
year."

From Pat Kieser: "In February I
will have completed ten years as
corporate librarian at Libbey-Owens-
Ford Company. I am now taking a
new course offered in Toledo Uni-
versity's Library School — library au-
tomation science. Have enjoyed very
much new friends and activities in
the Zonta Club of Toledo. Spent a
week in Montreal in early June at
Special Libraries Association con-
vention; one day visited libraries in
Ottawa — lunch at the newly-com-
pleted National Arts Centre. Late in
July I hiked with the Sky Line Trail
Hikers in the Sawback Range, north
of Banff — first day out we went to the
top of Badger Pass in a terrific snow-
storm! When I arrived in Banff I was
MOST interested to see the new pub-
lic library and archives; took a num-
ber of pictures in this fantastic new
building. In early September, Mother
and I visited in New Jersey; on to
Massachusetts for visits with friends
in Springfield, Newton, Rockport,
Cape Ann and in the Cade Cod area.
The return trip to Ohio was a beauti-
ful one — we came via the New York
Thruway and the old Cherry Valley
route, through the Finger Lakes re-
gion."



Robert S. Brown, husband of Betty
McGrath, has recently been elected
president and chief executive officer
of First Federal Savings and Loan
Association of Wisconsin.

Gertrude Fischer is currently serv-
ing as president of the New Canaan
(Conn.) Chamber of Commerce.

Nancy Keach Paine is a secretary
in the Alumni and Development Office
of Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass.

Jean Stewart Marshall x-'41 and
"husband race a 28' sloop during the
summer — usually fit in several fairly
short trips during the rest of the
year."

Betty Poore Willey took the Illinois
State Boards in July 1969 and is now
a registered nurse on the staff of the
Swedish-American Hospital in Rock-
ford.



'43

Jean Brigham Martin is a secretary
in the Albany (N. Y.) office of Kidder
Peabody & Company, Inc.

Nancy Wells Harris has three
children: Peter, 22; Robert, 19; and
Carolyn, 16.

Charlotte Aldous Shaw x-'43 does
social work for the Syracuse City
School System. Her current address
is: 57 North Street, Marcellus, N. Y.

Judith Foeley Randall, co-owner of
the Bell, Book and Candle Shop in
Rockport, travels extensively in
search of oriental antiques.

Jean Bosche Boyd x-'43 has three
daughters: Marcia, a senior at Skid-
more; Wendy, a freshman at Whea-
ton; and Cynthia, a second grader in
Wenham, Mass.

Elaine Kemp Johnson is a secre-
tary at the Indiana Supreme and
Appellate Courts. She is interested
in all political activities within Indian-
apolis.

Virginia Gibson Crouch x-'43
writes: "I am secretary to the Dean
of Wagner College and am working
toward a Degree. My major is Art,
but discovered a love for History
after completing two courses in
Western Civilization — now plan two



23



majors. I am a 'Johnny-come-lately'
student and love it!"

Priscilla Spence Hall is an Admini-
strative Assistant with the Lutheran
Senior Citizens' Foundation, Inc. of
Miami.

Mary Ledbetter Bastean has a
special interest in Archeology. She
has taken several trips to the Muse-
um of Anthropology in Mexico City
and has recently completed a tour of
the ruins of the Yucatan.

Esther Roth Garbe is dietitian at
the White Plains Hospital, White
Plains, N. Y. Dorothy E. Graham is a
research chemist at Boston University
Medical School.

Elinor Kuchler Hopkins sends a
new address: Brook Farm Road,
Bedford, N. Y. 10506.

From Jean Dewar Ferrell: "I went
back to college at age 41 with 900
other 'mature women' in North-
eastern's pilot program — The Wo-
men's Day Program — was among the
first 13 to graduate — June, 1968. I
currently serve as a Home Counselor
at the Salem, (Mass.) Cerebral Palsy
Clinic; shall soon complete work for
my Master's Degree."

Eloise Moffett Harper has requested
a catalog for her daughter Jill, who
attends high school in Indianapolis.
Eloise's mother Carita Palmer at-
tended Lasell in 1914-15; her grand-
mother Agnes Aldrich Palmer was a
student at the Seminary 1891-92.

Betty Moore Young's son Richard,
is a sophomore at Hampden-Sydney
College; her daughter Ellen, is a
junior at Stuart Hall.




Nason



'45

Connie Pettigrew Edie writes
from Savannah, Georgia: "Have
many fond memories and many
friends from Lasell. I was aptly
prepared for the kind of work I
wanted to do, and would not hesitate
recommending it to anyone."

Carol Hauber Mitchell teaches
mathematics at Trinity School, De-
catur, Georgia. Her three daughters
are Beth, 19; Sue, 16; and Jean, 12.

Barbara Mulcahy Witham is a sub-
stitute teacher in Falls Church,
Virginia.

Carolyn Quance Simmons sends a
new address: 710 Lawman Avenue,
Bridgeport, West Virginia 26330.

Marjorie Beebe Dill is in charge of
the Pine Orchard Nursery School,
Pine Orchard, Conn., and is a Board
member of New Haven Association
for the education of young children.

Priscilla Mauch Gillespie's spare
time "is spent in raising Basset
hounds for show." Her husband is
President of the Eastern Dog Club.

Peggy Brickett Sawyer is Red
Cross Water Safety instructor at a
local Girl Scout Camp; is actively
involved with the Natick Recreation
Program for the Handicapped.

In late December, Governor John
N. Dempsey announced the appoint-
ment of four new members to the
board of trustees of Undercliff Re-
gional Mental Health Center. Named
from Cheshire (Conn.) was Shirley
Campbell Ross x-'45. Shirley is
secretary-treasurer of the Cheshire
Ecumenical Committee and, as a
member of its sub-committee, helped
to organize a drug symposium. She,
husband John, and three children
live at 170 Brook Lane, Cheshire,
Conn.



'47

Nancy Stupak Parker is now as-
sociated with the Board of Education
in Nashua, N.H. Nancy is a member
of the American Association of Uni-
versity Women; she has served as



treasurer of the Northern Massa-
chusetts branch.

Nancy Barbarossa Ruggles has
served on fund raising projects for
the Brockton Hospital Women's
Guild and for the College Club of
Brockton.

Margaret Brion is head of Develop-
mental Reading in the Dedham
(Mass.) High School. Her doctorial
dissertation — Evaluation of the Use
of the Typewriter in Grades 4 and 5
— was published on microfilm in the
summer of 1961.

Nancy Pursel Tupper is a member
of The Fashion Group, Inc. in New
York City; Mollie Kendrick Pike is a
staff nurse at the Noble Hospital,
Westfield, Mass.

For the past ten years Gertrude
Rapp Griffith has raised Cairn
terriers. She has served a three-
year term as Secretary of the Cairn
Terrier Club of America.

Elizabeth Brady Hickey continues
her interest in all Ardsley (N.Y.)
community activities. Daughter De-
borah is now 20' Kathleen, 18;
James, 16; and Michael, 14.

Anne Alger Ehrlich writes: "With
no children to provide a schedule for
the day, I have had to go into the
community to make my own frame-
work of responsibilities — the result
has been like Jacob's Coat!"

Beverly Tucker Bowen adds to her
list of volunteer services — "now
learning how to transcribe Braille."
Lois Seidel Newell's vacation
time is spent in the Smoky Mountains.
Lois, a secretary for the American
Air Filter Company, lives at 310
Holmes Drive, Greenville, S. C. 29609.
Frances Burns McSweeney is cur-
rently serving as president of the
Stephen Caldwell Nursing Home
Auxiliary in Ipswich (Mass.). Fran is
also a Trustee of the Home.

Betty Jane Anderson Jaenike
teaches fourth grade in the Honeoye
Falls-Lima Central School in Honeoye
Falls, N. Y. Last year she set up a
government-sponsored program in
"Learning Disabilities" for primary
school children. The project proved
most rewarding. Betty Jane's older




Farrington



son, John Jr., is a junior at Amherst
College; Paul, a freshman at Hart-
wick; and Sarah, a senior at Pitts-
ford High School.

Ruth Maxted Mentall is a member
of Boston's Chorus Pro Musica and
of the Handel and Hayden Seciety.
She is also in the choirs of the
Second Church, West Newton and
the Arlington Street Church.

Blanche Meldonian is co-owner of
the family's supermarket in Milford,
Mass.

Sally Waring Buffinton's husband
is the Athletic Director at Tabor Aca-
demy, Marion, Mass. Sally's son,
Thomas H. Ill, is 20, Holly 17.



'49



NEWS:

Ann Hollett: Mrs. Neil Cameron

Munro, 7 Pine Hill Drive, Dix Hills,

New York 11746



Children: Peter Hollett Munro,
October 18, 1955 Elizabeth Titue
Munro, Aug. 7, 1957

Ann kept busy with sewing, reading,
gardening, bowling; and just inci-
dentally, with cleaning, cooking,
chauffeuring, painting, wallpapering,
and refinishing. She looks forward to
our 25th Reunion, and recovery from
a gall bladder operation prevented
her from coming to the 20th, which
she was sorry to miss.
Diane Palady: Mrs. James M. Barry,

34 Church Street, Westboro, Mass.

01581

Children: Heather Nell, Oct. 17,

1957 Deborah Ve, April 13, 1959

Craig McKeen, April 14, 1962
Diane is a Gir! Scout Leader,
Volunteer at YWCA, does sewing and
wallpapering. Her husband keeps
busy with the family, their 130-year-
old house and his hobby of guns.
Priscilla Randall: Mrs. Richard D.

Hurter, 124 Eaton Way, Cherry Hill,

New Jersey 08043

Children: Stephen, August 13, 1952

Clifford, August 22, 1954 Priscilla,

November 23, 1957
Dick has received a nice promotion
as Manager of the Haddonfield Office
for American Mutual Insurance Com-
pany, thus the move to New Jersey.
They have bought a lovely split level
in Cherry Hill and Prilly would love
to meet some Lasell girls that area.
Jeanne Zedren: Mrs. William C.

Scott, 145 Harvard Street Newton-

ville, Mass. 02160

Child: Leslie Jeanne Scott

February 4, 1956
Jeanne keeps busy with her family
and part-time nursing in a local
office, and keeps up with her sewing.
Her husband's favorite hobby is
bowling. The family went to Florida
last summer to visit Jeanne's parents.
Jeanne keeps in touch with Pat
Quirk Jones.
Cynthia Woodward: Mrs. John R.

Witherell, 6005 Jennings Lane,

Springfield, Virginia 22150
Jack returned to Vietnam for another
tour of duty in mid-November and
Cyn, Nancy (14) and Andy (12) hold



down the home grounds. They are
busy with Scouts, sports, music and
keep things hopping at home. This
coming summer they hope to spend
several weeks in New Hampshire and
I look forward to seeing them.
Nancy Curtis: Mrs. Arthur W. Grellier,

35 Pennymeadow Road, Sudbury,

Mass. 01776
Bill is a Cub Scout Pack Master this
year; Nancy, a Brownie Leader. All
the Grellier children are involved in
scouting. Nancy is on the Town A
tennis team, in Garden Club, a Home-
room Mother at school, and all this,
with church and business take care
of the hours in a day, plus the "taxi"
service rendered for the growing
family. Barbara and Alison take piano
lessons; Bobby, the guitar; Ricky, the
trumpet. Their "crazy" dog "sings"
to keep up with the rest of the
family.
New Addresses: Dorothy Harter: Mrs.

Harry H. Cunningham, Jr., 1 Hol-

yoke Lane, Stony Brook, New York

11790.

Vicki Heiden: Mrs. Burt Horen, 9

N. Quincy Ave., Margate, New

Jersey 08402
Christmas notes from Jean Sargent
Lee, Evie Frye White and Helen
Hamilton Croot indicated ail was
buzzing in their households. Also
hear from Louise Keene Mills who is
good about keeping me posted. My
only wish is that more girls would
write to me.

K.P.H.

Joan Nelson Peterke writes from
515 Maple Street, Annville, Penna.:
"This is our third year in Annville.
My husband is assistant professor of
Economics at Lebanon Valley Col-
lege. I recently completed the written
portion of a correspondence course
in teaching the Montessori Method.
At present I am teaching a small
Montessori-style nursery school in
the local United Methodist Church."

Joanne McEvoy Blamstrom, a past
president of the College Club of
Brockton, is a member of the
Stoughton School Committee, and is
an active conservationist. She also
has time to do Fashion Commentat-



2$




Carpenter



ing for Boston and local specialty
shops.

Pat Trammell Swanson lives at
Muleshoe Ranch, Breckenridge,
Texas, where she "breeds registered
Hereford cattle. Showing and judging
them is perhaps my most unique
hobby."



'51

Doris Stewart Davis is a medical
secretary in Morristown. New Jersey.
Susan Baker Chase is office manager
at the Willie Ross School for the
Deaf in Longmeadow, Mass.

Helen Lancey Smith plans to re-
tire this year from her work at the
Sanborn Junior High School in Con-
cord, Mass. She will then attend a
local college to obtain her B.S. De-
gree.

Nancy Topping Heely is an assis-
tant at the Presbyterian Nursery
School in Tenafly, New Jersey.

Marjorie Dyer Hubbard writes
from 8233 W. 97th Street, Overland
Park, Kansas: "since my Lasell days
I have lived in two different States."
Our two sons are both hoping to be-
come doctors.

Ann Van de Veer Lander is now
assistant coach of the Auburn (N.Y.)
Aquanotes — a synchronized swim-
ming team.



Nancy Bazarnick Poppin has re-
cently exhibited three sculptures at
the Muskegon Art Gallery.

Norma Appleyard is an executive
secretary at the Peter Bent Brigham
Hospital in Boston, Mass. During her
"off hours" she enjoys skating and
golf.

Susan Goetz Preston is Public Re-
lations Director for Laird Advertising
in Rochester, N.Y. Susan, her hus-
band and their three daughters en-
joyed a lengthy European tour last
summer.

Lorna Becker Harrington writes of
her volunteer work. She is Interna-
tional Education Chairman for the
Delta Gamma Fraternity. "This in-
volves my supervising ten foreign
students and placing them on col-
lege campuses throughout the United
States. They are selected through
the Institute of International Educa-
tion in New York."

From Florence ("Kelly") Mangan
Putnam: "Have thought of Lasell
often and particularly in the last year
and a half. I felt that I received an
excellent background in the secre-
tarial field — after 17 years of being
a wife and mother, I went back to
work with no brush up. (Knees quak-
ing and a bit rusty.) The skills came
back quickly and I was delighted!
After my dear Bob died, a kind friend
asked me to work for him at the
rectory of St. Patrick's Church in
Glen Cove. Then I was offered a
position at the Locust Valley High
School. I work ten months of the
year, having the same vacations as
my children.

During our winter vacation, the
five children and I enjoyed a week
of warm sunshine in St. Croix."



'53

Mary Wellington McKoan has all
busy days; her children are: Linda
Beth 14; John, Jr. 12 and Mark 10.

Elaine Crook Birrell is the owner
of Country Barn Creations, North
Scituate, R.I. The business special-
izes in flower creations and paint-
ings.




Hawthorne



The present address for Audrey
Felzenberg Silberman is 2718 Prince-
ton Drive, Durham, N.C. Audrey's
volunteer activities center around
the local hospital. For three years
she served as President of the Duke
Hospital Auxiliary; was District Rep-
resentative to the state board of the
North Carolina Hospital Association;
is a buyer for the hospital gift shop.

Mary Potter Jenney is a volunteer
at the Prince George County Hos-
pital, Seabrook, Md.; is working
toward a B.S. degree in Nursing at
the University of Maryland.

Marie DiSilva Stocki is a dietician
at the Waltham Hospital, Waltham,
Mass. Barbara Howell is the head-
nurse at Boston's New England Dea-
coness Hospital.

Shirley Vara Gallerani is a member
of the faculty at Plymouth House
Nursery School in Framingham,
Mass. Joanne Dolphin Craffey is
owner and director of the Village
Play School in Lunenburg.

Nancy Orr Schultz writes: "We
'rediscovered' camping three years
ago! My parents summer home on the
Cape is still a favorite spot for spring
and summer vacations."

Audrey Lang Clark describes her
family (Donna 11; Cynthia 10; Nancy
8 and Thomas 6): "We are campers.
Have traveled and enjoyed many
spots in the Canadian Maritimes and
along the eastern seacoast." Audrey
now lives at 1415 Summit Lane,
Charleston, W. Va.

Mary Thomas Justice enjoys her
summer employment. She is a sales-
person at Yesteryears Doll Museum
in Sandwich, Mass. The museum is
operated by Mary's parents Col. and
Mrs. Ronald Thomas.



Mary Elizabeth True is an architec-
tural news reporter for the F.W.
Dodge Division, McGraw-Hill Infor-
mation Systems Co. in Cranston,
Rhode Island.

Joanne Schur Sommers writes:
"my main interest, of course, is hus-
band and three children! Outside
interest is drama. Have joined a
dramatic workshop and have taken
part in a number of musicals and
one act plays."




Haskell



Martha Gries Davis now lives in
Pittsburgh where she has "been ac-
tive in many projects including the
Symphony, Educational TV, United
Fund and many fund raising activi-
ties. I am serving my third year on
the Board of the Three Rivers Art
Festival."

Elizabeth Ring LaPage reports a
new address: 1065 Washington Road,
West Rye, New Hampshire.



'55

Jean Ryder Tyler is Educational
Assistant of the First United Meth-
odist Church of Middletown, Ohio.

John C. Maclay, husband of Mari-
lyn Valter, is an Engineer with the



Bell Telephone Laboratories. He is
credited with perfecting a sea plough
which buries sea going telephone
cable under the ocean floor.

Dianne Tuzik Ober and John Pin-
gree were married on October 10,
1969.

Elaine Heath teaches Art — Kinder-
garten through grade 6 — in the Hing-
ham, Mass. public schools.

Judy Lanese Karazulas is serving
as President of the Greater Bridge-
port Women's Dental Auxiliary. Her
address is: 35 Wedgewood Drive,
Easton, Conn. 06612

Beverly O'Brian Perry serves as a
modeling counselor in Baton Rouge,
La. and occasionally does fashion
commentaries.

Druscilla Sen Watson who lives in
Roseda, California maintains a vaca-
tion home in Hawaii. Druscilla, a
member of the Honolulu Academy of
Arts, has three daughters — Deborah
Ana, Lynne Malani, and Tamara
Kanani.

Mary Lee Klipper Singer describes
herself as "a strictly housewife grad-
uate. As a family we are very active
in sports — swim, play handball and
Softball depending upon the season.
Our main interest is our dogs — we
raise St. Bernards."

Nancy Goodman Cobin serves as
corresponding and recording secre-
tary for Temple Emanuel in Lowell,
Mass. Her children are Donald, An-
drew and Linda.

Nancy Bray Dwyer is a second
grade teacher in Manchester, New
Hampshire.

Ann Heyman sends her apartment
address: 321 East 71st Street, New
York City, N.Y. 10021. And is em-
ployed by Bankers Trust Company,
N.Y.

Lois Kuhn Hopson is active in
Larchmont's Junior League. For the
past two years she has worked at the
League's "Nearly New" shop.

Charleen Herrling Smith is a mem-
ber of the Board of the Syracuse
Symphony. She serves as Special
project Chairman of the Memorial
Hospital Auxiliary.

Evelyn Bradley Cochran is man-
ager of The Idea House in Baton
Rouge, Louisiana.



Carole Smith Handler has two
sons, Michael, 12, and Charles, 8.
Active in many civic projects in
Waterbury (Conn.), she is a past
President of Temple Israel's Sister-
hood.

Gigi Harold, a secretary with NBC
in New York, writes: "Traveling has
always been my favorite pastime —
and ever since my very first mid-
semester ski trip to North Conway,
N.H., skiing has been a very big part
of my life. I have taken two trips to
Europe — skiing in St. Anton, St.
Christoph, Zurs, Lech, and St. Moritz.
And when not on vacation, I usually
spend winter weekends skiing in
Vermont."

Russell Reinhart, the first blind
missionary to work for the Christian
Service Corps, and his wife, Alberta
(Flint '55), have just returned from a
two-year term with Wycliffe Bible
Translators in Mexico and Peru.

While in Mexico, they operated a
children's home for missionary chil-
dren whose parents were off in iso-
lated Indian villages translating the
Bible into native tongues. Russell
also held weekly Bible classes for
personnel and worked in Bible cur-
riculum development.

In September 1969, they were
transferred to Peru, where they
worked at the jungle base for Wy-
cliffe.




Barn



27




Karandon



Mrs. Wesley J. Vesey (Phyllis
Thompson) with husband and family,
Ann 12, Lynn 10, Dawn 7, and Ken-
neth 6, will be living in Tuebingen,
Germany for five months while Dr.
Vesey studies at the University. The
Vesey children will visit the German
schools and the family will travel in
France, Netherlands and British
Isles. Dr. Vesey is on sabbatical
leave from his teaching at Mt. Union
College, Alliance, Ohio, where he is
a member of the Religion Depart-
ment.



'57

Joan Bergevin Barron is deeply
concerned in letter writing for the
Prisoners of War and Missing in
action. The latter category includes
her brother. Joan's present address
is: 45 Newell Creek Rd., Ben Lo-
mond, Calif. 95005.

Janet Dow Papa and family — Jo-
anna, Mark and David — look forward
to summer camping in Maine. A va-
cation home will soon be completed
at Merrymeeting, Bath.

Mary Jane Gill Lockwood is
"mainly concerned with Peace for
Mankind. Having three little boys
(ages 7, 5 and 2) my 'peacemaking'
is confined to home. Perhaps the
home is the place to start promoting
peace which hopefully can extend
into the community, the state, the
country, the world."

Gail Vose Etsch is owner and
headmistress of The Bolton School,
Westport, Conn.



Renate Griemsmann Judson has
three daughters: Rebecca, 10; Jo-
anna 8, and Christina, 6.

Elaine Lanoue Tenney is a reme-
dial reading teacher aide with the
Greenfield (Mass.) school system.

Marilyn Brown Stover has a new
address: 348 Washington Street,
Bath, Maine.

Judy Komito Oster's chief hobby
is ballet — she attends weekly classes;
has performed in several musical
productions.

Janet Longaker Smith is associ-
ated with the Child and Family Ser-
vice Bureau of Syracuse, N.Y. Ruth
Ring is a social worker for the Com-
monwealth of Massachusetts.

Rosalie Sucher Schneider is an
executive secretary at the Burritt
Mutual Savings Bank, New Britain,
Conn.

Anne Whittaker Kallander is a 5th
grade team teacher in the Framing-
ham Public Schools. Her present ad-
dress: 118 Fenwick St., Framingham
Centre, Mass.



'59

Born: To Joan Sycle Norwitz a fourth
child, second daughter, San-
dra Miriam, on June 13, 1968.
Mr. George Lane of the English

faculty, spent the summer on Mar-




tha's Vineyard, where he succeeded
Mary Louise Sieracki Nash as or-
ganist of St. Augustine's Church,
Vineyard Haven and covered the
Mary Jo Kopechne hearings as cor-
respondent for The Economist of
London.

Dorothy Risteen Klocker has just
completed a refresher course in
nursing at the Salem Hospital, Salem,
Mass.




Gardner



Cushing



Beverley Juby Cooper is a medical
secretary at the Kaiser Hospital in
Los Angeles, Calif.

Linda Bailey Bolton describes her
"accomplishments: mother of four,
guardian of a 250-lb. St. Bernard,
pony, two cats, one tortoise two
gerbils, two field mice, one rabbit —
taxi service for all!"

Dianne Pitman Richardson is a
secretary at Wesson Maternity Hos-
pital in Springfield, Mass.

Louise Anne Harrison Leader
writes "until my marriage I was a
buyer for a chain of fourteen wom-
en's clothing stores. Do volunteer
work for a hospital for the aged, as
well as teach a china painting course
to adults."

Diane DuBois Manzoli is a dancing
instructor in Needham and at the
Dedham Community House.



Elaine Evans Fisk is a teller at
the Third National Bank in Spring-
field, Mass. She is a committee mem-
ber of the Junior League and of the
Wesson Maternity Hospital Ladies
Auxiliary.

Elsa Finard Waxman, a busy
mother of four, finds time for volun-
teer work with Women's Strike for
Peace.

Sandra Kenney Granese is a sen-
ior secretary at the General Radio
Company, West Concord. Sandy's
present address is: 22 Fairlane Road,
Stoneham, Mass. 02180.

Ann Talberth Lubar is a secretary
and administrative assistant at Bos-
ton University's School of Fine and
Applied Arts.

Joni Becker Stenicky has tem-
porarily retired from the retailing
field. Joni is now busy caring for
Laura, 6, and Kenneth, 3.

Virginia Mahoney Boylan writes:
"Have a nineteen-month-old son and
am very busy — housewife and
mother. My social responsibilities
are heavy as my husband is Prin-
cipal of Henry Barnard Lab. school
on R.I.C. campus (R.l.'s showcase).
I'm active in the R.I.C. Alumni, and
D.A.R."

Harriet Stallings Jarosh, a gradu-
ate of Simmons college, is head li-
brarian at the Downingtown (Penna.)
Public Library. Harriet also writes a
weekly column for the local news-
paper.

Mary-Louise Sieracki Nash has
three daughters: Louisa, 8; Moira, 7,
and Amy, 6. Their vacation time is
spent at Vineyard Haven.

Jean Hadlock Bromage, a sales-
girl for Carroll Reed Ski Shop in
Littleton, New Hampshire, spends
"off hours" skiing and mountain
climbing with her husband and two
young daughters, Bonnie Jean and
Sarah.



'61

Born: To Patricia McKinnon Wil-
liams, a son, Todd McKinnon,
on October 1, 1969.



From Bobbi Kerzner Lerman: "In
the past year, I started making petit-
point pictures. My pictures cover an
entire wall in my home. Have been
asked to exhibit at local Temples
and art shows."

Valerie Duval Pettinicchi is an ex-
ecutive secretary with the Waterbury
(Conn.) Housing Authority. Also in
the business world are Polly Greene
McGinnis and Laura Jensen. Polly is
a secretary with J. S. Love & Com-
pany, Inc., New York City; Laura is
a personnel assistant with the Amer-
ican Cancer Society, Inc.

Ellen Lediard Dolby is President
of the Long Island Chapter of Wom-
en's ORT (Organization of Rehabili-
tation through Training).

Virginia Orsi R.N. is affiliated with
the Greater New York Blood program.

Ellen Smith Burton now lives at
40 Morton Street, Holliston, Mass.
01746; she serves as program direc-
tor for the International Health Clubs
in Dedham.

Louise Motta Shimkin is the busy
mother of three young daughters:
Beth, Louise, and Mary.

Ann Davidson continues to enjoy
kindergarten teaching in Poughkeep-
sie, N.Y. She is a member of the
Board of Directors of the Poughkeep-
sie Teacher's Association. Ann Pers,
a first grade teacher in New Rochelle,
is working for a Master's Degree at
New York University.

Judith Ready Baird has retired as
Director of Personnel at the Jenkin-
town branch of Lord and Taylor's.
She now devotes her time to three-
year-old William.

Karen Larsen writes: "After leaving
Lasell, I worked as an assistant
buyer at Sage Allen in Hartford,
Conn, for one year. The following
five years I was an interior decorator
for the Ward Company in Hartford.
My last three years in the East, I
taught Modern dance at Saint Joseph
College in West Hartford. Took a
year's leave of absence to get my
B.S. at Brockport State in New
York."

Carole Kirschner Wilson now lives




Library



in Williamsport, Maryland, where she
is a member of the Junior Women's
Club. She is "busy raising children
and poodles." Carole is the mother
of Craig Wyman and Heather Lind-
say.

Sally Ann Cabral Crowe has two
daughters: Jennifer, 4; Caroline, 2.
Sally and her family have had the
opportunity to visit a number of his-
toric — as well as "exciting" — cities
across the country.

June Paione Lagerson is now "a
full time homemaker" — her three
daughters are: Shirley Ann, 5;
Lauren Mary, 4 and Nancy Eileen, 3.

Linda Fait York is an active mem-
ber of the Newcomer's Club in Way-
land, Mass. Her new address there is
77 Woodridge Road, 01778. Another
new address is one for Mary George
Poor: 15 Andrew Drive, Apt. 37,
Tiburon, Calif. 94920

Carolyn Bird Murray is editor of
a monthly calendar of events pub-
lished by the Greater Portland Arts
Council. Carolyn lives at 34 Fore-
side Rd., Cumberland, Foreside,
Maine.

Nancy Trudeau White is the man-
ager of Ailen's Alley, newly-opened
shop on Route 9 in Hadley at the
Amherst Town line. Allen's Alley
carries a line of "decorative acces-
sories" — Nancy considers the shop
"a necessity in a college community
— an important addition, something
new and fresh."

A new nursery school for children
3 and 4 years old will open Septem-
ber 1970 in Emmanuel Episcopal
Church, Cumberland Hill, R. I. The




Briggs



school will have two classes — one
will meet on three mornings a week
and will be limited to children who
will be 4 by December 30, 1970; a
two-day school will enroll children
who will be 4 by June 30, 1971. The
emphasis of the school will be on
creative learning experiences for
children. Beverley French Keigwin
will be the head teacher for both
schools. Assistant teacher is Mrs.
John Randall, a graduate of Middle-
bury College.

Judy Tibbetts Johnson writes from
a new address — 423 Ludlow Street,
Portland, Maine: "In January we
moved to Portland where my husband
has a position with Fairchild Semi-
conductor as supervisor of Systems
and Programming. I started a New-
comers' Club in February and have
been elected president for the next
year. It is a wonderful way to meet
people and has proved to be a very
rewarding experience. Ran into my




Lasell classmate, Carolyn Bird Mur-
ray; it brought back so many happy
memories of our college days. She
is interested in reactivating the Port-
land Alumnae group — Sue Dennison
Harmon lives in Portland; Sharon
Handley House, in Saco."

'63

Weddings:

Beverly issokson and Robert
S. Levine on February 14, 1970
in Milton, Mass.
Karin Skoogland and Stephen
C. Bartow on February 7, 1970
in Boston, Mass.
Born: To Marjorie Myles Miller, a
daughter, Kimberly Ann, on
June 14, 1969.

To Bonnie Rogers Collins an
adopted daughter, Stacey
Rogers, born January 2, 1970.
Nancy Gould is a social worker
assistant at the Children's Hospital
in Boston. Bonnie Hankin Cohen is a
staff nurse at North Shore Children's
Hospital, Salem, Mass. Barbara Freer
Urquhart is on the staff of Massachu-
setts General Hospital. Ellen Kaplan
Gittleman is supervisor of physical
therapy at Our Lady of Fatima Hospi-
tal in North Providence, Rhode
Island.

Maris Kleinman Delano has been
awarded a fellowship in Special
Education with the Williamson
County District Department in Car-
bondale, Illinois. Linda Welt Horowitz
is a teacher with Dallas (Texas) In-
dependent Schools. Sue Kerstein is
a teacher at Lake Normandy School
in Potomac, Maryland. Mary Lou
Colby Daley substitutes at the Apta-
kisic School in Prairie View, Illinois.
Mary Cole, in addition to her teach-
ing duties in Hanover, Mass., offers
volunteer help to the "Sesame
Street" program at WGBH-TV in
Boston.

Ruth Dunn Souza now lives in
Williamsburg, Va., where she is a
member of the Welcome Wagon Club.
Ruth has two sons — John Michael
and Paul, Jr.



Gail Ferrucci Camputaro's vaca-
tions are spent in Florida visiting
sister Linda (Ferrucci Merrell '58).
Gail and family plan to move to
Florida this summer.

Joyce Miller Roey is enjoying life
in California. She, Harold, and their
three young sons live at 417 Moun-
taincrest Road, Duarte.

Margo Hicks Waite is an executive
assistant of the Dukon Corporation in
Berlin, Conn. Her favorite hobby:
buying, selling, and training thorough-
bred horses.

Edna Mary Shannon is a securities
analyst at the New York office of F. I.
duPont.

Carolyn McVey Krasawski writes:
"my husband has been in the Air
Force for the last four years. We have
travelled throughout the States east
of the Mississippi River; have lived
for short periods of time in seven of
them." Carolyn's present address is:
59 Highland Ave., Sumter, South
Carolina 29150. Daughter Deborah
Lynn was born November 18, 1969.

Daryl Schmid French and husband
are the new owners of Pond Street
Marina in Wakefield, Rhode Island.

'65

Engagements:

Nancy K. Burrough to David

A. Barry

Donna Stern to Carl J. Caputo
Weddings:

Gail Jacobsen and Arne M.

Isaksen on February 8, 1970 in

Fairhaven, Mass.

Susan K. Layng and Warren F.

Bogle, Jr. on February 7, 1970

in Coconut Grove, Florida.
Born: To Carol Levine Armon, a

daughter, Dana Lynne, on

March 4, 1970.
Carol Cacciamani, head teller with
State Street Bank, served as a full-
time auditor during the Massachu-
setts Bay United Fund campaign.

Beverlee Pembroke Hill is doing
court reporting and legal secretary
work on a part-time basis in Mont-
pelier, Vt. Her second son, Daniel



Ordway



Pembroke Hill, was born January 10,
1969. Beverlee is looking forward to
attending her 5th Reunion.




Hoag



'67

Engagements:

Judith Vidmark to David D.

Nielsen

Janice J. Whitehead to Robert

E. Mosher

Ruth L. Wilson to Clyde A.

Wright




Weddings:

Susan Sullivan and Paul
Crowley on March 21, 1970 in
Bar Harbor, Me.

Margary Friberg received a B.A.
degree in business administration on
June 8, 1969 from Simmons College.
She planned to tour Greece, Italy,
Germany, Switzerland and England
during the summer on an American
International Academy theatre ap-
preciation tour and was to do inde-
pendent study in Europe to earn six
credits toward a Master's degree.
Margery was elected to the Academy,
the scholastic honor society at
Simmons.

From Mrs. Helena Lillywhite we
learn that Sue was married in Febru-
ary (1970). She is now Mrs. Peter A.
Berkoski; current address: Little
Fresh Pond Road, R.F.D., Southamp-
ton, N. Y. 11968.

Barbara Bunce received a B.A. de-
gree from the University of Denver
in August 1969. She is now working
in the Psychology Department.

Susan L. Swanson is now teaching
in the Eastham (Mass.) Elementary
School. Sue was graduated magna
cum laude from Springfield College
last June with a BS degree in ele-
mentary education.



'69

Engagements:

Deborah Caputo to David F.

O'Connell

Mary A. Conboy to John J.

DeRosa, Jr.

Paula Lanigan to William

Thayer

Carol H. Lavitt to Leopold H.

Greif

Phyllis Moore to Laurence S.

Mongno, Jr.
Weddings:

Judith Chambers and Steven

C. DeWitt on Feb. 14, 1970 in

Natick, Mass.



Lauren Dye has graduated from
Eastern Airlines' flight attendant
training center in Miami; has re-
ported to New York, where she will
be based.

Jennifer Damon is an Assistant at
the Dreamworld Country Day School
in Scituate, Mass.




Converse



Wass



In Memoriam



Adelaide Philbrick Sumner x-'03 on February 22, 1970
in Staten Island, N. Y.

Barbara Vail Bosworth '05 on January 25, 1970 in
Medford, Ore.

Louise Funkhouser Colegrove '09 on February 28, 1970
in New York, N. Y.

Mildred Woodbury Page x-'09 on January 9, 1970 in
Burlington, Vt.

Julia Crafts Sheridan '10 on May 10, 1970 in
Sarasota, Fla.

Barbara Clark Colby x-'12 on June 21, 1969 in
Seattle, Wash.

Mildred Shaw Curtis x-'12 on December 18, 1969 in

Leominster, Mass.
Eleanor Smith Dean x-'13 on April 7, 1970 in

Mansfield, Conn.

Edna Christiansen Beckwith x-'16 on October 3, 1969.

Marie Engeln Pollard x-'19 on March 21, 1970 in
Sarasota, Fla.

Ruth Davis Frost '20 on March 9, 1970 in

Gloucester, Mass.
Luella Bassett Maynard x-'23 on April 25, 1970 in

Fall River, Mass.
Phyllis Bridger Leathers '26 on February 12, 1970 in

Boston, Mass.
Sara Foster Farnsworth '26 on March 22, 1970 in

Pompano Beach, Fla.
Martha Silliman '27 on October 20, 1969.
Rosamond Adams Guerrero '30 on April 4, 1970 in

Boston, Mass.

Agnes Neu '39 on January 12, 1970.
Lucy Albro Luddie '40 on February 14, 1970 in
New Britain, Conn.

Margretta (Peggy) Foster Osborn '40 in 1969.
Polly Irvin '41 in the Fall of 1969 in Skaneateles, N. Y.
Emily Vazza Souza x-'44 in August 1969.
Patricia Gilbert Pillsbury (W.P. '35-'36, H.S. '36-'37) in
March 1970 in San Francisco, Calif.



LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE

Alumnae Office
Auburndale, Massachusetts 02166



ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED






o

a:
a-




2*33




T

ZJ *



Mrs. Everett
7 Parkview Dr.
L'iLlburn, EL J*



Stocrsan

07041



2)S



LASELL
LEAVES



Reunion Issue
Summer 1970





Lasell Alumnae, Inc.



Officers 1970-71

President

Sandy Shelton Fitch '56 (Mrs. Norman P.)

9 Fox Lane, Medfield 02052

First Vice-President

Penny Rafkin Hurwitz '56 (Mrs. Budd H.)
4 Rolling Drive, Framingham 01701

Second Vice-President

Kay Woolaver Parsons '46 (Mrs. George E.)
32 Marcia Road, Watertown 02171

Recording Secretary

Betty Williams McGowan '47 (Mrs. F. M., Jr.)
52 Brewster Avenue, Braintree Highlands 02185

Corresponding Secretary

Lee Pool Langley '46 (Mrs. P. B.)
355 Highland Street, Weston 02193

Treasurer

Ruth Turner Crosby '42 (Mrs. R. A.)
170 Harvard Street, Newtonville 02160

Assistant Treasurer

Ruth Buswell Isaacson '36 (Mrs. C. G. G.)

10 Laurel Avenue, Waltham 02154

Alumnae Fund Committee

Alice Pratt Brown '29 (Mrs. William W.)
Crest Road, Middlebury, Conn. 06762

Mildred Bell Cole '31 (Mrs. Oliver S.)
95 Fox Hill Street, Westwood 02090

Louise Tardivel Higgins '37 (Mrs. C. A., Jr.)
150 Hickory Road, Weston 02193

Scholarship Committee Chairman

Virginia Wolfe Perkins '44 (Mrs. E. F., Jr.)
76 Orchard Lane, Melrose 02176



Directors

Mildred Strain Nutter '17 (Mrs. Denton G.)
1094 Centre Street, Newton Centre 02159

Toni Meritt Smith '23 (Mrs. W. N.)

110 Woodland Road, Auburndale 02166

Dorothy Inett Taylor '30 (Mrs. L. D.)
41 Brentwood Drive, Holden 01520

Shirley Gould Chesebro '33 (Mrs. R. Alan)
110 Carver Road, Newton Highlands 02161

Faye Wadhams Smith '38 (Mrs. Edward L.)
Duncaster Lane, Bloomfield, Conn. 06002

Camie Porter Morison '40 (Mrs. Wm. K.)
8 Park Ridge, Concord, N.H. 03301

Marilyn Blodgett Hall '46 (Mrs. E. Sherman, Jr.)
60 Ledgelawn Avenue, Lexington 02173

Mary Small Lee '48 (Mrs. Walter C.)
192 Pine Ridge Road, Waban 02168

Judy Parker Haas '49 (Mrs. R. H.)

3 Sherwood Road, Nashua, N.H. 03060

Linda Nolin Ahem '55 (Mrs. Robert)
106 Hemlock Street, Arlington 02174

Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 (Mrs. Bruce B.)
Box 181, Dover 02030

Nancye Van Deusen Connor '57 (Mrs. Philip J.)
28 Pilgrim Road, Wellesley 02181

Susan Shaw Abbott '61 (Mrs. William S.)
24 Kimball Road, Arlington 02174

Nan Sparks Hunter '61 (Mrs. Carl E.)
69 Main St., Framingham Centre 01701



Alumnae Secretary

Marjorie MacClymon '32

Lasell Junior College, Auburndale 02166

Lasell Leaves

Editor

Patricia Searles

Alumnae Editor

Marjorie MacClymon '32



The Lasell Leaves is published quarterly by Lasell Alumnae, Inc., Lasell Junior College, Auburndale, Mass. 02166,
a member of the American Alumni Council since 1947. The views expressed herein are those of the editor and do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of the administration or Lasell Alumnae, Inc. Single copies of Lasell Leaves may
be obtained for $1.25 from the Alumnae Office.



L
A
S
E
L
LEAVES



Vol. XCV No. 4
July 1970



Contents



Cover:
The blend of old and new in campus
buildings was the subject of a special
tour-by-Lasell-bus instituted during
reunion weekend this year. Miss
McClelland served as guide for return-
ing alumnae on the tour, which
included Eager House (seen here
through the garden gate) and the New
Dorm.

Credits:
The article on page 8 is reprinted from
The CEA Critic, February 1970. Copy-
right 1970 by the College English As-
sociation.



From Yesterday to Today 2

Commencement Address 3

'70 in a Year of Dissent 6

My Sister Mary is a Neophyte or,

Look to Your Laurels, Mrs. Malaprop 8

Photography Offers New Art Medium 10

Focus on Alumnae 15

Reunion 16

Class Notes 22

In Memoriam 33

Point 33



Photos:

H. Robert Case: 3, 6, 7
Robert Chalue: 22
cover: James Stanley and

Phokion Karas
Others by the Editor







From Yesterday
To Today



A Word About

Women's Colleges

in America



Colleges for women have been the outgrowth of
the nineteenth century, although this state-
ment seems hardly credible to our college-girl
of to-day, who prides herself on being able
to cope in things intellectual with any
Harvard student. Co-education was first tested
at Oberlin in 1833, and five years later the
first diploma ever issued to a woman was
granted by this college to a young lady whose
name is unknown. This was quite a startling
advance upon the ideas of our forefathers, who
insisted women were created solely to look
after household matters. Yet, though this
was indeed a great gain to our sisters of that
day, the crying need of America at that time
was a college exclusively for women.

Finally, after the people had for fifteen years
agitated the question of higher education for
women, justice and good sense prevailed, and
the Georgia Legislature in 1836 chartered the
Georgia Female College, which was presently
built at Macon. The first faculty was made
up of eleven professors and teachers; and
although the curriculum of study fell far below
that of the same college at the present day, it
was equal to that afforded by the majority
of the contemporary colleges for men. What a
vast difference between this and the faculty
of Wellesley or Vassar! But everything must
have its beginning.



— Illustration from Lasell Seminary Catalogue, 1895



The Georgia Female College opened
January 9, 1839, with an enrollment of ninety
ambitious young ladies. Eleven of them,
having already received, from seminaries which
they had been attending, a course of
instruction entitling them to enter the senior
class, were graduated the same year,
and had the honor of carrying off the first
diplomas ever granted by a college exclusively
for women. Such is the history of the first
college for women ever established in America.

The example once set, other states founded
similar institutions, and in 1861 Vassar, of
which we to-day are so proud, was founded at
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Our colleges, as a rule,
have not been developed after the plan of
boarding-schools; but, as far as is possible to
make them so, they are copies of men's
colleges. It is the desire of the faculties of such
colleges to obliterate all intellectual
distinctions based on sex, and to make woman
equal to man in her intellectual attainments.
This idea of equality has been carried out,
as far as the adoption of the same curricula
tends to its promotion; but it can never
be fully realized until women have something
to take the place of the athletics of the
colleges for men. A sound body is essential to
a sound mind. Without good health it is
impossible to do justice to one's studies. The
belief that fewer rules and less restraint on
students create an independent spirit, and are
followed by better results, is coming rapidly
to the front. Hence it is easily seen how much
more is expected of us than our grandparents,
who had not nearly so many advantages.
Every year the educational advantages
for women improve in a remarkable degree.
'Tis not only to colleges that we owe a
heavy debt, but also to the numerous prepara-
tory and other schools. We see with thankful
hearts what a great advance the education
of the women of to-day shows when compared
with that of only seventy-five years ago.

-from Lasell Leaves, April 1895



=—



Commencement Address



Following is the text of remarks made by Dr.
Fred M. Hechinger, Education Editor of The N.Y.
Times addressing the 115th Commencement
exercises on June 6, 1970.



This is not the year, and this is not the moment
for ceremonial talk. It is not the time to
engage in routine backward glances, nor in
business-as-usual admonitions. Nor is it, I
think, at all productive for us to face each other
as members of different generations, however
much chronological age may divide you and
me. It seems to me downright frivolous now to
talk about such platitudes as the generation
gap. There is no gap in the realities that
face all generations of Americans alive today.
The reality is one of crisis, of a nation
divided as it has not been divided since the
Civil War. The reality is a crisis of confidence,
a feeling we have strayed off the roadmap.
The reality forces us — all of us together —
to ask the question put to us precisely by so
balanced a philosopher and social critic as
John Gardner: "What must be done to prevent
our society from disintegrating?"

I think most of us, whether we oppose or
support specific American policies of the
moment, are fundamentally agreed on our
desperate search for an end to the war abroad,
and peace amongst ourselves at home. We are
not a callous people. We are shaken by the
sight of young men and women killed, as we are
shaken also by reports of innocent women
and children massacred in the emotional
degradation of a war we cannot — and indeed
should not — understand. It is to our credit
that so many Americans shuddered alike to the
news of Milai, Kent State and Jackson. We
do not — and we never must — grade tragedy
by the nationality, race or color of those
who are its victims.




Dr. Fred M. Hechinger



But I do not want to speak today primarily
about the war and the reaction to it, although
I deeply believe we must end the war as
quickly as possible. It is quite conceivable that
we may find our way out of Viet Nam, and may
still not be able to find our way back to
America.

The moral confusion, although it helped get
us into the war in Indo China, is deeper
than the war itself. The greater danger is that
we lose faith in our institutions and ultimately
in ourselves. Much of the attack today is
directed against the system. Those who defy
the system and bring it to a halt, in the
courts, in the schools and in the universities,
become heroes. This I think is wrong and
dangerous. I say this not as a conservative but
as one who has always distrusted the status
quo, and who believes that a system that
does not respond to the need for change is
doomed.

Despite all its faults, all its detours and aberra-
tions, the American blueprint offers



remarkable scope and promise to the advance-
ment of freedom. Considering the size of
this continental nation, and the complexity of
its population, the marching orders contained
in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights
remain miracles of pragmatism and high ideals.

The safeguards against the abuse of power
built into that system are, although not absolute
nor perfect — as we know so well today —
nevertheless are capable of preventing
disastrous abuse, provided we have the
courage and the determination to make them
work.



We must be uncompromising in our demand
that our elected national leaders desist from
actions and statements which divide the
country. We cannot allow these officials to
ignore the laws and the Constitution. No
national emergency is so great that a violation
of civil liberties and usurpation of powers is
not more serious.

We cannot permit law enforcement agents to
take the law in their own hands. The mission
of the police and the National Guard is to
keep the peace and prevent injury — not to
break the peace and inflict injury.



Those who attack the system have chosen
the wrong target. When the system fails to
work, it is the fault of the men who work the
system. It is the fault of those of us who elect
the wrong men. Beyond that it is the fault of
all of us who create the wrong atmosphere,
who abandon sanity and morality, who put the
Constitution and the Bill of Rights on automatic
pilot.

Our freedom and safety, indeed the entire
American experiment on the eve of its 200th
birthday, are today in danger unless we
recognize that the fight against repression and
coercion cannot be fought selectively. It must
be fought with equal will and integrity on all
fronts.

Repression is intolerable whether it comes
from reactionary government officials,
legislatures and police forces, or from coercive
students who want to force other students,
faculty members, or the colleges themselves,
to submit to their views or demands. There
is no difference between construction workers
who assault student protestors, and student
dissenters who forcibly prevent their opponents
from speaking, or who employ arson and
"trashing" against those with whom they
disagree.



But neither can we allow dissenters, whatever
the idealism of their cause, to threaten,
coerce, or commit violence. A young professor
at Columbia recently said he saw nothing wrong
if some of his colleagues were manhandled
when they tried to enter a building which
radical strikers had shut down. A faculty
committee at a great state university recently
said that it was better to learn to live with the
breaking of windows and occasional fire-
bombs than to allow the police to patrol the
campus.

I consider such readiness to live with violence
on campus a disaster. If force defeats reason
in our colleges, then force is certain to
triumph over reason throughout the land. We
must fight the evil in our land, prejudice,
poverty, injustice, and the exploitation of
human beings. We must recognize our failings
and correct them, but there is no gain in
nationalizing and Americanizing what are
human failings. A highly idealistic critic of
American education said recently that Ameri-
can schools are the most autocratic in the
world. This is of course nonsense. Much is
desperately wrong with American schools but
it is fair to say that they are close to being
the least autocratic in the world. This may not
be saying much for the schools elsewhere.
But if we mis-diagnose what is wrong with
our own, it will make it that much more
difficult to cure their real ills.



Similarly, to submit to the slogans of America
as the most racist, or imperialist, or in-
humane society is to obscure rather than
expose and attack the real issues. The wrongs
under attack are made no less odious because
they are human, rather than American failings.

The fact is that the American system of
government, properly led and used, is
potentially better equipped than any other to
fight against racism, imperialism and exploita-
tion. Guilt feelings are no substitute for
effective and competent action to make the
system serve the people, all the people,
without regard for race, color or religion.

A scholar I know recently took his radical
teenage son on a scientific expedition to Africa.
After his return, he commented on the im-
pression the experience had made on his son.
It made him realize, the father said, that
poverty is not an American invention. It made
the young man no less complacent, but it
made him direct his efforts at the problem of
dealing with poverty, instead of raging against
America.

In an earlier wave of educational reforms
almost two decades ago, a professor who
helped shape a new curriculum said that the
goal of all sound education ought to be to teach
people to consider the consequences of their
actions.



If we make it our goal to consider the conse-
quences of our private and public actions, and
if we do so in our political actions too,
holding our officials responsible for the con-
sequences of what they say and promise and
do, then we can look beyond the present
turmoil.

But to do so, we must recognize slogans for
what they are: devices to deceive us. They
deceive us about the inability of generations to
talk to each other, to sort out the interests
they share, rather than those which divide
or distinguish them, and work together. Even
when the style differs, the ends can be jointly
sought.

If you and I cannot talk together, how will you
talk to your own children later on? Yet I am
sure that you will want to bridge the gap
when you become parents, just as I am trying to
do between me and my children. The way to
accomplish this, I believe, is to start once
again to think of people, not of movements or
establishments, and to consider the con-
sequences of our actions on the lives of those
people, those we love, those we barely know,
and even those we dislike — even our
enemies. When we do that, and turn our backs
on those who refuse to join us in that human-
izing endeavor, particularly if they are
politicians, then we can once again become a
nation of hope.



This has always seemed to me a basic
prescription. If we had only considered the
consequences, would we be in Viet Nam, or in
Cambodia today? Would we ever have allowed
one race to exploit another? Would we vote
on the promise of short-term satisfaction
of immediate self interest? Would we really
have any doubt that the protection of anyone's
rights, and the rejection of anyone's coercion
is worth putting up with any amount of
temporary inconvenience?



And you, in your families, in your communities
and in the world, can be part of regaining
what we, in our blindness have almost lost.

Thank you.






70 in a Year of Dissent



While the class of 1970 nationwide ended
a year of violent and non-violent campus action
in a turbulent spring of graduations, or
protests to graduation, or the omission of
graduation altogether, graduation for 70 at
Lasell concluded a more peaceful year of
involvement in the trends of dissent and
change.

During the year '70 had been concerned
first about the war in Viet Nam. In the fall
seniors led campus interest in organizing pro-
test activities and participating in the October
15th Moratorium.





Some obtained peace petition signatures from
commuters at nearby MBTA stations, others
joined the thousands marching onto the Boston
Common in peaceful protest. The Lasell News
carried a series of articles discussing the
war from its origins to a poll of faculty opinion
and an eyewitness account of the November
march on Washington by Cindy Watts '69.
In The Lamp 70 said: "We dedicate our book to
those Living . . . Fighting . . . and Dying in
Viet Nam."

On campus seniors were concerned with the
regulations, the organization, and the direction
of the College, in meeting and creating
change. A Student-Administrative meeting
instituting Blue Book changes to relax the
regulations covering dress, smoking, and
car permissions was followed by a Student-
Executive Council meeting to prepare
proposals later submitted as 25 demands to
the Administration for college government,
curriculum and organization changes. In the
spring their efforts to achieve student represen-
tation at faculty meetings resulted in voting




membership for four students who were in at-
tendance at the April 26 meeting for the
first time in Lasell's history. A student strike to
support five faculty members who had been
issued terminal contracts resulted in the
establishment of an Ad Hoc Committee
composed of four students, four faculty, and
three administrators now meeting once a week
to set up faculty evaluation procedures.
The program for Commencement itself had
been modified to include remarks by both
student speakers and a faculty spokesman. In
everything, the theme had been increased
participation and involvement.




My Sister Mary is A Neophyte, or,
Look to Your Laurels, Mrs. Malaprop



To those of us who live constantly with the
Death Wish in that bizzare, dim half-world
called English 101 or Freshman Composition,
the Vocabularly Game is still an effective
By George Lane memento mori, the gray speck, the Ash

English Department Wednesday daub on the forehead reminding

us of our vulnerability as champions of the
Word in the Age of McLuhan. One batters away
at the resistance to precision, at the hostility
to objective standards of criticism nurtured
through four year of "creative" high school
English classes, sweats out somebody's
eclectic anthology of essays or short stories,
examines one's own methods for symptoms of
faltering "relevance," weeds out the tosh
and twaddle and resounding cliches of a
succession of "themes," offers hints for Effec-
tive Writing, laboriously expounds the
classics, such as Orwell's "Politics and the
English Language." In short, one tries to Cope.

Somewhere in their early college or even
pre-college experience (judging from the num-
ber of themes that begin "Webster defines
'love' as . . .") students have acquired access to
a serviceable dictionary. In repose, which is
to say, seen from the infallible side of the
lectern, their faces reflect amusement,
comprehension, even curiosity. Some may
challenge one's more flaccid generalizations or
dispute a point here and there in the reading.
So when the time comes to see how much
is intelligible to them in context, one is under-
standably hopeful that some borders of
meaning have been defined.

But the ear, evidently, works well ahead of
the dictionary mind. A while back, after calling
attention to some of the more exotic terms
in our reading, and suggesting that a Funk
& Wagnall's formula was not enough for the
diligent scholar, who must apply a word accur-
ately, perhaps even gracefully, I asked my
freshmen to use each of the following words
in a sentence:



8



1.


introspective


2.


mercenary


3.


effete


4.


neophyte


5.


analogy


6.


unctuous


7.


Junkers


8.


anthropomorphic



1.

2.

3.

4.



8.



A few sample results, not necessarily the most
striking, but food for thought among aspiring
pedagogues:

They were always effete after hiking.

Anyone may use the analogy, which is

up in the library.

My sister Mary is a neophyte.

Neophyte can be found in the ground.

It is one of the 92 natural elements of the

world.

5. The analogy we use in class is full of
interesting essays written by well-known
authors.

6. The mercenary traveled from mission to
mission.

7. The judge had no choice but to be
mercenary.

Over the years John had become a
neophyte.

The effete was quite tall and beautifully
composed.

He was a neophyte at writing [sic].
The girl next store [sic] was often called
a neophyte by the gang in school.
Mr. Gray was loved by all, he was
congenial, and one of the biggest
neophytes in his neighborhood.
We should more introspective ourselves
at that point.

Something very effete had to be done
to improve the style and plot of the essay.
The Junkers, once they receive their
supply, wait patiently for the addicts.
If you see strange looking people
stranding around a ship, looking sus-
picious, they are probably Junkers.

1 7. The neophyte set fire to all the barns
along the way.

18. The Junkers came to the town dump
yesterday, but could find nothing.



10.
11.

12.



13.



14.



15.



16.



19. George and his wife went on a mercenary
trip to help George's sick mother.

20. Some of my best friends are anthro-
pomorphic.

Brooding over such, one is tempted to give
the students credit for unsuspected resources
of whimsy. At least they apply themselves to
the search for plausibility, euphony and
coherence, after a fashion, and some of the
exotic usages hold up rather well, empirically.
When I introspective myself, for instance, I
find that I am effete after a three- or four-mile
hike, though not necessarily tall or beautifully
composed, and it is true that many, if not
most, of my best friends are anthropomorphic.
To those of us who remember the films of the
1940's, moreover, Nos. 16 and 18 evoke
vivid glimpses of Hollywood heavies like Otto
Preminger and Erich von Stroheim, suitably
trench-coated and monocled, sifting through
the community refuse in search of the
secret formula.

The instructor may well conclude, too, as
the themes drift in, that some freshmen are
more apt than he assumed to rely on auditory
osmosis in keeping the stale phrases out of
their writing. A mourner is described as
"prostate with grief." The village post office is
alive with activity because "not only the
natives but the summer people conjugate
there." A brief immersion in modern literature
may return a mind-bending judgment that
"Albert Camus was an exit-sensualist."

One is grateful, after a couple of deep breaths,
for the images thus provided, and once again
made aware that in teaching Freshman
English (or any other foreign language) the
trick is to enunciate slowly and distinctly.



Photography Offers New Art Medium



When photography was introduced into the art
department curriculum this year as a two-semester
credit course for senior art students, cameras
could suddenly be seen almost anywhere
on campus. A new darkroom was completed
under the direction of art instructor Jan Doucette
who teaches the course, and students shooting on
and off campus began to produce many interesting
results on a variety of assignments. Some of
these explorations into the aesthetics of a new
art form, were included in the spring issue of
The Quill and are reproduced here.








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14



Focus on Alumnae



Profile: Sara-Jane Osborne '64



Freckle-faced Sara Osborne holds the
distinction of being Senior Charge Nurse of
the only hospital Foot Room in the country.
Working with six members of the
Deaconess medical staff, Sara sees over
30 diabetic patients a day suffering from
foot problems that are commonly associated
with the disease.

About 80 percent of the patients who
are admitted to the hospital for foot infec-
tion or gangrene undergo surgery involving
amputation of a toe, several toes, or a
leg. Sara, assisted by two Foot Room
nurses, is faced with the monumental task
of rehabilitating these patients.

"No one looks forward to an amputation,"
she said. "Usually their outlook is
pessimistic; they're against the world and
the doctors and nurses who are treating
them. We urge them to think positively
about the relief from the pain of infection an
amputation will bring and the renewed
ability to walk again with an artificial leg.
When they have made up their mind to
accept the amputation, they begin asking
questions like how long surgery will take,
how much pain there will be following
the operation, and how much they will be
able to do for themselves with an artificial
limb."

Sara arranges for a physiotherapist to
visit the patient before surgery. Four to five
days following surgery she teaches him
how to use a walker and how to do the
various exercises necessary to strengthen
his muscles. Patients who have undergone
leg amputations are measured for an
artificial leg five to seven days after sur-
gery, and the leg is put on sometimes as
early as two weeks after surgery.



dressing — an art requiring a good deal of
finesse as foot dressings have a way
of coming off. Sara meets with the other
Foot Room nurses once a day to talk over
the best approach for each patient because
not every patient accepts surgery the
same way. Many older patients may require
special attention if other health problems
are involved, such as a heart condition,
or bad eyesight or hearing. If necessary,
Sara arranges for a social worker to
aid the patient in the rehabilitative process.
Her job doesn't end when the patient
leaves the hospital. If the patient is return-
ing home, Sara puts in a request for a
visiting nurse to see him at home.

The challenge of rehabilitating a patient
following surgery is a tough one calling
for patience and perseverance. "We get 79-
year-old patients who tell us they would
rather die than go through surgery for an
amputation," she said, "but they walk out on
a new leg and leave us in a cloud of
dust." Sara is particularly proud of one
patient who was admitted for a below
the knee amputation — a procedure requir-
ing lengthy rehabilitation. He weighed in
at 300 pounds before surgery. After surgery
he lost 100 pounds and is now back
driving a truck.

Sara became Senior Charge Nurse in the
Foot Room in November 1968 after
deciding she wanted to go into a more
specialized area of nursing. The area she
picked is so unique that there are no
textbooks on feet or special courses to take
for preparation. "On the job training"
takes from four to six months before a Foot
Room nurse is accustomed to the doc-
tors, the routine, and what to do for certain
conditions.




Head Foot Room Nurse Sara Osborne ap-
plies a new dressing to the foot of a patient
who is recovering from surgery.



southern Europe in 1966 and has a
trip to northern Europe including Russia
and Germany planned for the spring.



Reprinted with permission from the March
1970 issue of The New England Deacon-
ness Hospital Pulse.



The "team approach" is used in the
treatment of foot problems. Sara's day
begins by making rounds with the doctors.
She removes the dressings, discusses
with the doctor how the patient is pro-
gressing and what new activities he is per-
mitted to do. She applies a new



Sara began working at the Deaconess
the day after graduation from Lasell.
Prior to becoming a Foot Room nurse, she
worked as a staff nurse. When she's not
headed for the ski slopes in the winter or the
beach in the summer, she's busy planning
her next traveling adventure. She toured



15



Reunion



'30 at the 40th




Front row, I. to r.: Ruth Lenahan Kask, Frances Smith
Miller, Corinne Cowdrey Murray, Phyllis Jensen Swenson
Back row, I. to r.: Eleanor McKenney Black, Dorothy
Meeker Pearce, Joan Collier Cooper, Marjorie Magune
Curtis

The Class of 1930 celebrated their 40th
Reunion at Lasell on June 12-14, 1970.
What a great success for those who were
able to be there! Ruth Lenahan Kask,
Corinne Cowdrey Murray, Marjorie Magune
Curtis and I took advantage of the
opportunity to stay at the college for the
weekend. It was truly delightful — great
accommodations and greater meals!

After the Friday evening Buffet we
gathered in my room for a "social hour" —
we had a chance to read the returned
questionnaires and to catch up on all the
latest news of classmates.

Dorothy Meeker Pearce met us after
breakfast on Saturday — incidentally, she
won honors for coming the farthest distance
— from Sarasota, Fla. We enjoyed the tour
of the campus in Lasell's new Greyhound
bus with Miss McClelland as our guide.
What changes and additions have been
made since our day!

Phyllis Jensen Swenson, Joan Collier
Cooper and Eleanor McKenney Black
arrived in time for Alumnae Luncheon; our
total representation was eight.

A "class meeting" was held after
luncheon; the following new officers were
chosen: Secretary, Ruth Lenahan Kask;
Agent, Eleanor McKenney Black; Reunion
Chairman, Corinne Cowdrey Murray.

Our Day concluded with dinner at the
Pillar House on Saturday; Lillian Bethel '28
joined us.

We look forward to seeing many of you
at our 45th in 1975.

. . . Frances Smith Miller, Secretary



'65 at the 5th



We vote a very special Thank You to
Linda Foster Nixon and to Gay Urban, who
served as volunteer co-chairman for
1965's Fifth Reunion. Their "extra" efforts
including preparing the following report:

Rhoda Adelman

387 A Roanoak Ave., Willimantic, Conn
Married Philip R. Moskowitz on June
8, 1969. Received her BS in Elementary
Education from U. of Bridgeport
and her MA from B.U. Presently
teaching the third grade in Chaplin.
Outstanding memory of Lasell: May
Cotillion '65; Bermuda.

Joan Allen

14 Willow St., Apt. 28, Westboro,
Mass. 01581. Married Gerald G.
Papazian on December 23, 1967.
Received her A.B. from Clark Univer-
sity, and is a teacher of the 7th and
8th grades.

Nancy Almgren

13 Clark Street, Easthampton, Mass.
01027. Married to Robert W. Killam on
November 22, 1969. Presently
employed as a receptionist and enjoys
fishing, camping, reading and tennis.

Cynthia Ames

27-1 Arlington Road #6, Woburn,
Mass. 01801. Married Alan H. Rutan on
August 28, 1965 and has a daughter,
Jennifer Lee, born May 6, 1970. Enjoys
skiing, sailing, and art classes. Trip
to Great Britain last fall. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: The friendships
I made.



Sally Beaven

75 Orchard Street, Cambridge,
Mass. 02140. Married Peter J. Garfall
on August 6, 1966. Enjoys sewing,
cooking, reading, crewel, embroidery
and photography. Outstanding memory
of Lasell: Due to the time of year
right now I remember sunbathing on
the fire escape at Bragdon.



Note:

"The information contained in this report
has been taken from trade and statistical
services and other sources which we
deem reliable. We do not represent that it
is accurate or complete and it should not
be relied upon as such. Any opinions
expressed herein reflect our judgment at
this date and are subject to change."



16



Susanne Benz

6 Berry Ct., Congers, New York 10920.
Married Peter M. Costa on April 8,
1967 and has a son, Michael P.

Carole Bourdon

3504 Laurel Ave., Manhattan Beach,
Calif. 90266. Married Robert R.
Suddaby on October 20, 1966 and has
two children — Anne Elizabeth and Mary
Kristine. Employed as a stewardess
until her marriage. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: Our preoccupation
with ourselves — such carefree
attitudes.

Gretchen Boyer

2360 43rd East #401, Seattle,
Wash. 98102. Married Gary R. Ritner
on May 10, 1969. Presently employed
as an office nurse to Ophthalmologist.
Outstanding memory of Lasell:
Throwing Miss Borden in the river
on Race Day.

Susan Briggs

20 Parkview Drive, Hingham, Mass.
02043. Employed as an inside claims
representative for American Mutual
Insurance Co. Enjoys skiing, sewing
and boating. Lived in California for a
year and travelled across the U.S.
in 1967. Outstanding memory of
Lasell: Graduation.

Laurel Brown

3 Glover Square, Marblehead,
Mass. 01945. Married John N. Bickell
on May 28, 1967 and has a four-month
old son, Peter N. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: The friends I made
there.

Carol Bruins

34 Hamilton Road #309, Arlington,
Mass. 02174. Married Frederick A.
DeStefano on June 22, 1968 and has a
son, Mark Thomas, born December
13, 1969.

Lynn Callis

1 Shadyside Ave., Port Washington,
New York 11050. Married Marshall
G. Brown on November 26, 1966 and
has a daughter, Kimberly Ann.
Enjoys crewel, sewing, tennis and
swimming.

Ruth Catler

19 Indian Lane, Sharon, Mass. 02067.
Married Warren Brenner on August
20, 1967. Presently a secretary at B.U.



Betsy Clapp

Christian Hill, RFD #1, Milford,
N.H. 03055. Married Quentin R. Searle
on August 14, 1965 and has two
children — Richard Peter, born January
27, 1968; and Jo-anne Dorothy, born
May 2, 1970. Enjoys crewel, knitting,
gardening, League of Women Voters,
Church Librarian, Junior Women's
Club, and is President Qf the N.H.
Lasell Alumnae. Outstanding memory
of Lasell: Song Fest Night, Lasell
Night at the Pops, the Barn.

Sandra Clark

6 Lloyd Lane, Brewer, Maine 04412.
Married James B. Carson, Jr. on
September 25, 1965 and has two
children — Carolyn and Jamie.
Presently employed as a medical
secretary, Eastern Main Medical
Center, in Bangor. Spent a year in
Alaska, 1966-1967.

Sally Cote

412 Ware Ave., Apt. 873, Scott Air
Force Base, Illinois 62225. Married
Capt. Joseph M. Tirone on March 22,
1967 and has a son, Gregory M., born
April 18, 1970. Active member of Scott
AFB Officers' Wives Club and Material
Wives' Club.

Marie Coven

110 West 37th St., Baltimore, Md.
21210. Married Fred H. Kaplowitz
on August 28, 1969. Graduated in
January, 1969, from Long Island
University with Bachelor of Science
degree and is presently teaching
nursery school for Maryland Dept. of
Social Services. Outstanding memory
of Lasell: "What's the color of Clark
House? Yellow, Yellow!"

Nancy Currier

475 West End Avenue, Apt. T4,
North Plainfield, N. J. 07060. Received
basic certificate from the American
Institute of Banking and attended the
N. J. Public Relations School,
Princeton. Presently employed as a
marketing research assistant, Summit
and Elizabeth Trust Co. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: The Physical
Education Dept. They're a great group
of people and a tremendous asset
to Lasell!

Susan Dangel

63 Gould Road, Waban, Mass. 02168.
Employed as an executive secretary at



WEEI/CBS radio. Outstanding memory
of Lasell: Dorm life.

Priscilla Davis

10 Danforth Ave., Woburn, Mass.
01801. Married William F. Johnson on
July 30, 1966 and has two children —
Deborah Ann, 3 years, and Karen
Michelle, 6 months.

Anne DeArment

696 Ellis Ave., Meadville, Pa. 16335.
Married Samuel A. Naples, Jr. on
May 6, 1967 and has a son, Shawn
Stuart, born February 12, 1969.
Outstanding memory of Lasell: Good
old Bragdon 3rd floor.

Carolyn Derby

9 Jefferson Road, Madison, Conn.
Married Robert W. Neal on February
12, 1966 and has a son, Jeffrey Robert,

17 months. Lived in Frankfurt,
Germany for 1 1 /2 years.

Diane DeSilva

43 North Drive, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y.
10522. Married Robert A. Grant on
August 14, 1965 and has two children
— Abigail, 3 years, and Marne, 1 year.

Debby DeStaebler

156 North Woods Road, Manhasset,
N. Y. 11030. Married John S.
MacGowan on February 16, 1969, and
has a daughter, Kimberly Joan.
Received her B.S. in Elementary
Education from B.U. Moving to
Deerfield Beach, Florida, in August,
where husband will teach. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: The many lasting
friendships that were made.

Dorothy Esperian

18 Highland Circle, Needham, Mass.
02194. Lesley College 9/65-6/67.
Presently teaching second grade in
Millis. Outstanding memory of Lasell:
Lasell Night at Pops, which I always
enjoyed.

Maureen Faerber

56 Orchard View Rd., Portsmouth, R. I.
02871. Married Carmine F. Ripa on
June 10, 1967 and has a daughter,
Jennifer Lynn, born May 17, 1968.
Graduated from Dunbarton College
of the Holy Cross in 1969. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: Candle light
ceremony at graduation, activities of
the last week.



17



Laure Finnerty

66 Smith Street, Waltham, Mass. 02154.
Married Ronald G. Thompson on
December 26, 1964 and has two
children — Ronald, Jr., born June 25,
1966, and Gregory John, born
September 22, 1969. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: Father-Daughter
Weekend, where we won best looking
couple.

Linda Foster

32 Saint Paul St., Brookline,
Mass. 02146. Married David S. Nixon
on September 17, 1966. After a year
of marriage, David and Linda worked
their way around the world in 13
months. Hobbies include painting
and sewing. Outstanding memory of
Lassel: The warmth and friendships.

Wendy Gaillard

44 Devon St., Malverne, L.I., N.Y. 11565.
Married Francis G. Blaha on
February 1, 1969. Trips include Hawaii,
Europe 8 or 9 times, Antigua, Nassau,
and Africa. Activities include working
with disadvantaged children. Out-
standing memory of Lasell: The
demerit system and trying to overcome
it.

Linda Garber

9 Brooks Terrace, Swampscott,
Mass. 01907. Married Joel G. Cohen
on May 8, 1966, and has a daughter,
Laurie Ellen, two years of age.
Greatest enjoyment is re-discovering
everything around us with our
daughter. Outstanding memory of
Lasell: The closeness of the girls in our
house and the Father-Daughter
weekend.

; Lee Gissler

164 Alexander Ave., Bridgeport,
Conn. 06606. Married Joseph F.
Andera on October 25, 1969. Presently
Chief Cytotechnologist at Bridgeport
Hospital. Outstanding memory of
Lasell: The people I met and friends
that I made.

Sonia Gould

2300 S. 24th Road, Apt 417, Arlington,
Va. 22206. 1965 to 1967, University
of Bridgeport. Presently a staff member
to Senator Jacob K. Javits, Wash-
ington. Outstanding memory of Lasell:
Lots and lots of laughs!



Anne Greenberg

2911 Sparger Road, West Durham,
N. C. 27705. Married Leonard Kovit on
August 17, 1968. Graduated in June,
1968, from the Pratt Institute. Presently
employed as floor manager in a
department store.

Ellyn Greenstein

144-27 35th Ave., Flushing, N. Y. 11354;
married Kenneth Greenbaum on June
30, 1968; graduated from Mills
College of Education in June, 1967,
with a B.S. in Education. Presently
teaching kindergarten. Unable to
attend reunion because of a surprise
anniversary party for my parents. Will
miss seeing everyone.

Kristin Harper

44 Roberts Drive, Bedford, Mass.
01730. Married Michael Oldenburgh
on August 16, 1969. Graduated from
Wheelock College and is a first-grade
teacher at Underwood Elem. in Newton.

Nanci Hartstone

73 Nicholas Rd., Framingham, Mass.
01701. Married Malcolm D. Gulden on
December 18, 1966 and has a son,
David Jonathan. Trips include Puerto
Rico & V.I., California, Texas,
Alabama, and most recently Hawaii.
Planning to visit New Orleans in
September.

Sara-Jane Hayes

Eagle Hill, Ipswich, Mass. 01938.
Married Edward L. Nagus on August
26, 1967. Presently employed as a
medical secretary.

Katherine Healey

120 Swanson Ave., Stratford, Conn.
06497. Married Michael L. Marella on
July 27, 1968 and has a daughter, Amy
Elizabeth, 9 months. Attended Uni-
versity of Bridgeport. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: The warm friend-
ships of the girls.
Patricia Hebert

1341 Cook Street #306, Denver,
Colorado 80206. Received B.S. from
Colorado State University and pro-
fessional certification from the
University of Denver. Presently a
graduate student. Outstanding memory
of Lasell: Science Club and Chemistry
classes.

Diane Hildebrand

139 W. Tulpehocken St. #F-2,
Philadelphia, Pa. 19144. Married Glenn
F. Cadagan on June 14, 1969. Presently



employed as a receptionist at IBM.
Trips include Europe, Bermuda,
California (with Jean Hill Johnson and
Peggy Sylvester Schreiber), and
Hawaii. Outstanding memory of Lasell:
Father-Daughter Weekend.

Jean Hill

18 Mangano Ct., Watertown, Mass.
02172. Married Gerard G. Johnson on
August 16, 1967, and has a son,
Matthew, born May 21, 1970. Attended
the Chandler School for Women.
Outstanding memory of Lasell: my
friends.

Dorothy Hodgson

47 Osborne Lane, Southport, Conn.
06490. Married Richard H. Rea on
July 19, 1969. Enjoys swimming,
tennis, gardening and a trip to England
and Scotland this May. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: Nurses' graduation
and capping ceremonies.

Judith Jack

247 Oxford St., Rochester, N. Y. 14607.
Attended nursing school (one year) at
the University of Rochester. Presently
employed as a lab. technician, doing
research for the department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology at the
University of Rochester. Enjoys singing
with Rochester Oratorio Society,
skiing, sailing, and tennis.

Peggy Jacobs

175 Summer St., Apt. 304, Maiden,
Mass. Boston University Class of 1967,
Elementary Education; presently
working on masters degree at North-
eastern, and second-grade teacher in
Andover. Outstanding memory of
Lasell: The friends made.

Laura Johnson

2735 HollisterTerr., Glendale, Calif.
91206. Married Ronald Race on June 6,
1965.

Sue Johnson

490 California Street, Newtonville,
Mass. 02160. Married Victor A.
Nicolazzo, Jr. on May 7, 1966, and has
one son, Victor III. Outstanding
memory of Lasell: Wonderful friends.
Many, many outstanding memories —
did meet my Nick!

Donna Kane

5 Lincoln St., Apt. 1, Plymouth,
Mass. 02360. Married Reginald L.
Audibert on July 9, 1966 and has one
daughter, Catherine Danielle, 1 1 /2
years of age. Husband is career Army



18



officer, so we move 2-4 times a year,
have lived in Germany. Georgia, and
Alabama. Enjoy bridge, reading,
and sewing. Outstanding memory of
Lasell: Many friends at Draper House.

Lorna Kelly

91 Central St., Auburndale, Mass.
02166. Married Lucian J. Colella on
July 2, 1966 and has a son, Stephen
Arthur, born March 18, 1968.
Enjoys ceramics and dressmaking.
Outstanding memory of Lasell: Father-
Daughter Weekend.

Dianne Koenig

Married to Tracy W. Greene on June
20, 1969; is presently living at 302B
Boston Post Road, Marlboro; B.B.
from University of Maine in 1967 and
M. Ed from Northeastern University
in 1968.

Linda Kopit

Married to Roger Leigh Cohen on July
2, 1967; 5411 Meadow Wood Blvd.,
Lyndhurst, Ohio; completed education
at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio;
presently a housewife with trips to
Mexico, Bermuda and Florida; remem-
bers close friendships, faculty that
cared; son, Douglas Leigh born on
Dec. 24, 1968.

Roberta Ellen Krasnow

Married to Steven Bert Wallach on
Dec. 18, 1966; 337 Winter Street,
Brockton; Boston University 1967;
taught in Maiden and is now a
kindergarten teacher in Hebrew Day
School; interested in new home in
Brockton and remembers the Lasell
people.

Eleanor Lamson

Married to Horatio Hathaway Brewster
on July 24, 1965; 45 Prospect St.,
South Dartmouth; daughters — Elizabeth
Anne (Feb. 1, '67) and Karen (May 21,
'69); is on the Board of Directors of
New Bedford Day Nursery and
Secretary to New Bedford Assembly
Assoc; enjoys boating and short side
trips to see Lasell friends; remembers
the casualness.

Karen Langley

Married to Frank Walter Hansler on
August 24, 1968; 127 2nd Street,
Bordentown, N. J.; daughter Dannielle
Ann (June 22, '69); housewife and
mother enjoying painting and trips to
New England; remembers Haskell
House girls.



Susan Layng

Married to Warren F. Bogle, Jr., on
February 7, 1970; 730 17th Street, #18,
Des Moines, Iowa; University of
Colorado '67; Stewardess with Pan
American World Airways for 2 years;
is presently working in unique dress
shop; remembers broadening experi-
ences and close friends that were
made.

Rhoda Le May

Married to Alexander J. Krause, Jr., on
October 12, 1968; 900 Spencer
Place, Apt. 105, Philadelphia, Pa.;
daughter — Caroline Alexandra born
October 12, '68; housewife enjoying
sewing.

Anne Lessner

Married to Michael A. Chorches, M.D.;
3548 Ashford Dunwoody Road,
Atlanta, Georgia; children, Stacy John
(5), Alexander (2); homemaker enjoys
sewing, needlework and took a trip
to Mexico; married on December 16,
1963.

Susan Lind

Married to Howard Vinson Hennigar,
Jr., on October 25, 1969; 152A Mount
Vernon St., Boston; Parsons School
of Design; is currently Assistant
Buyer at R. H. Stearns in Boston.

Marcia Lundgren

58C Brackett Place, Marblehead; is
presently a Stewardess for T.W.A.;
enjoys skiing, sailing, traveled through-
out Europe and lived in San
Francisco for 2 1 /2 yrs.

L. Harley MacKenzie

married to Richard L. Elia on October
18, 1969; 375 Arlington St., Watertown;
took courses at Northeastern and is
presently Secretary to Dean of
Admissions at Northeastern; remem-
bers her classmates.

Ann Mattioli

146 Stratton Brook Road, Simsbury,
Connecticut; majored in Sociology at
Russel Sage, B.A. in '67; is presently
a social worker for the Connecticut
State Welfare Department; taking art
courses, and is a member of the
Wadsworth Atheneum Art Museum;
trip to Jamaica, a member of the Conn.
Valley Lasell Alumnae Club; remem-
bers life at Clark House.

Christine McKegg

Married to David E. Mungello; 2534
Benvenue #16, Berkeley, California;
daughter — Lisa (6 mos.); B.A. in



Education at George Washington
University; working for an interior
decorator; remembers dorm living.

(Bunny) Marguerite Melchinger

married to William Henry Nurick on
December 21, 1968; 5426 Parkmor
Road, Calabasas, California; son,
Christopher David; B.A. degree from
Newark State College; is presently a
housewife interested in Another
Mother for Peace (if interested please
contact) and Environmental Informa-
tion (ecology action!).

Mary Jane Mueller

Married to Robert James Supanich on
May 7, 1966; 1324 Cortez Ave.,
Burlingame, California; presently a
Service Representative at Peninsula
Hospital; husband works for United
Airlines and they have traveled to
England and Virgin Islands;
remembers friends and closeness with
staff and students.

Susan Meyer

Married on January 29, 1967 to
Stephen Reade Datz; 591 So. Fairfax
St., Denver, Colorado; son, Stephen
Christopher (born Sept. 8, '68), and
is expecting in June; attended the
University of Denver for 1 year and is
presently a housewife.

Meredith Miles

Married on January 28, 1968 to Richard
J. Coppola; 35 White House Pike,
Audubon, N.J.; Mills College of Educa-
tion; is presently a teacher; enjoys
bridge, golf, and traveled through
Europe last summer with her husband;
remembers the fun had with friends
in Carpenter Hall.

Suzanne (Midge) Mohn

Married Donald I. Noll on August 19,
1966; 30 E. Monument Ave., Hatboro,
Pennsylvania; currently enjoying being
a housewife and is awaiting an
adopted child, is doing volunteer work
with retarded children and Planned
Parenthood; remembers Mr. Bliss'
economic classes.

Lydia Moissides

Box 273 1010 W. Green St., Urbana,
Illinois; Aurora College and the
University of Illinois; graduate student;
interested in music — solo work and
choir; trip to Cyprus; remembers very
friendly and homelike atmosphere.



19



i/Vendy Myers

Married to David M. Winer on June 13,
1967; 17B Hope Street, Stamford,
Conn.; Boston University School of
Education; is presently a teacher
in Greenwich School system; remem-
bers wonderful teachers like Mrs.
Sypher and Dr. Packard.

Jill Norton

Married to Gordon Lewis Weeks on
June 6, 1964; 21 Yale Drive, Milford;
sons, Jeffrey Lewis (5) and Scott
Edward (18 months); presently a
housewife.

Joanne O'Brien

Married to Anthony J. Ricciardi on
November 25, 1966; 316 Old
Conn. Path, Wayland; married a
widower with 5 boys (ages 16 to 5) and
had a daughter, Kristin on March 30,
1968; presently a housewife.

Carolyn Otten

Married to Thomas K. Somers, Jr.,
on June 21, 1969; 5003 Sentinel Drive,
Sumner, Maryland; took courses at
American University in D.C.; and is
presently a travel agent for All Ways
Travel Agency.

Marilyn Paganelli

Married to Stuart C. Cummings on
February 2, 1969; 767 Buena Vista West
#301, San Francisco, Cal.; presently
a flight hostess with T.W.A.

Deborah Parker

Married on March 15, 1970 to Kenneth
T. Solnit; 223 East 82nd Street, New
York, New York; received a B.S. in
marketing from the New York
University and is presently employed in
market research; spent a year and a
half traveling in Europe; remembers
the 9 P.M. curfews.

Robin Paulding

Married to Bruce Hewitt Chisholm on
August 17, 1969; 617 Broad St.,
E. Weymouth; B.S. from Boston
University and is presently a 4th grade
teacher in Hingham; remembers lasting
friendships, uniqueness of attending
a small school.



Karen Pedersen

16 Bradish Lane, Bay Shore, New York;
is presently unemployed and remem-
bers curfews.

Virginia Pedrick

Married to Robert Farnsworth
Searle on September 11, 1965; North
Meadow Road, Amherst, New
Hampshire; children, Natalie Jean
(2 1 /2) and John Prescott (6 months); is
presently a housewife enjoying skiing,
sports car racing (spectator), camping
and yearly trip to St. Croix, V.I.;
remembers the Father-Daughter Week-
end.

Beverlee Pembroke

Married to John H. Hill, Jr., on August
21, 1965; Upper Terrace RFD #1,
Montpelier, Vermont; sons, John
Harold III and Daniel Pembroke;
presently employed as a part-time
court stenographer; interested in ski-
doers, V.P. of Vermont Association of
National Association of Legal
Secretaries and active Secretary of
Montpelier Mothers Club; remembers
the friendships acquired.

Janet Perkins

Married to James Anthony Thompson
on August 5, 1967; Prospect Hill Road,
Harvard; attending Fitchburg State
College, majoring in Elementary
Education, will graduate in June 1971;
enjoys sailing and is looking forward
to cruising along the coast of Maine
this summer; remembers the warm and
friendly atmosphere, lasting friend-
ships and helpful instructors.

Sandra Perkins

Married to Donald Lee Jones on
September 17, 1966; 9 McKinley Street,
Concord, New Hampshire; presently
Executive Secretary for Director of
N.H.-Vt. Hospitalization Service; enjoys
sewing and cooking.

Jane Reiner

Married to Roger L. Allen on August
12, 1967; 6 Heon Court, Nashua,
New Hampshire; son, Dale Robert; is
presently a housewife.

Susan Rosenberg

Married to Dr. Abraham Meltzer on
November 20, 1966; 1050 George St.,
Apt. 9E, New Brunswick, N.J.; son,
Jeffrey (9 months); University of
Bridgeport A. A.; presently a home-



maker attending classes in Understand-
ing Judaism, member of Women's
Auxiliary of American Medical Assoc,
for Middlesex County, N.J., travel,
cooking and child rearing; remembers
getting mail at the Barn.

Sibyl Ryan

Married to Paul L. Piccone on June 14,
1969; 2 Milligan Place, New York
City; is presently an executive secretary
and enjoys skiing, surfing, motor-
cycling, travelled to London, Switzer-
land, France, Italy and Hawaii;
remembers the friendships of a great
group of girls; activities to suit
everyone's interests.

Catherin Sanford

Married to Kenneth Nurmi on May 16,
1970; Darby Road, Brooklyn, Conn.;
presently Credit Manager at Ruitman &
Son, Inc., in Providence, R.I.; has
recently toured Europe, taken a trip
throughout mid-eastern coastal states,
and enjoys sailing.

Miriam (MimiJ Schrank

Married to Paul Schneinerman on
September 4, 1966; 3330 Woodburn
Village Drive, Annandale, Virginia;
twins, Tamara Lynn and Jason Michael;
Mills College in New York City and is
presently a housewife.

Louise Schwartz

Married to Stanley M. Rose on June
25, 1967; 21 Holly Road, Reading;
received her B.S. in 1967 from the
Boston University School of Public
Communications; presently a legal
librarian for Goodwin, Procter & Hoar;
enjoys sewing and cooking;
remembers the clean, feminine girls.

Janet Sherlock

Will be married to John Lee Parks on
September5, 1970; 1220 N.E. 143rd,
Seattle, Washington; presently a
stewardess for Pan American; has
lived in Hawaii, worked in advertising
and retailing and is now flying polar
and Pacific routes with Pan Am;
remembers being rushed to the
hospital after a fashion show for an
appendectomy.

Lucy Shales Pettee

% Pierce, 7420 Burbank St., San Diego,
California; presently a bookkeeper,
enjoys fishing and remembers the good
times.

Ann Silverman

Married to Stephen Irwin Goodman on
August 15, 1965; 37 Woodfield



20



Road, Portland, Maine; children —
Elissa Beth (3), William James (1) &
Sandi Shand (2 mos); presently a
housewife and remembers the warm &
lasting friendships.

Dianne Sokolik

Married to Jack Schwartz on February
12, 1967; 11577 Templar Drive, St.
Louis, Mo.; is a housewife with two
sons — Scott (21 mos) & Dana (1 1 /2
mos).

Mary Sprague

Married to John Kirk on August 12,
1967; 37 Christopher Road, Holliston;
took a course at Boston University;
is presently a medical secretary;
enjoys camping and bowling; remem-
bers Father-Daughter Weekend and
Clark House.

Elaine Stiler

Married to David Alt on September 3,
1967; 2507 Marine Place, Bellmore,
New York; daughter — Jacquelyn
11 mos), received her B.S. in 1968
from Mills College of Education and
Masters in El. Ed from Adelphi
University; presently a housewife &
substitute teacher and enjoys politics,
cancer care, bridge & canasta; remem-
bers the college life itself — friendliness
of faculty and student body.

Virginia Stiles

Married to Richard Payson Shepardson
on Nov. 22, 1968; 76 Court St.,
Westfield; received B.A. at American
International College; presently an
elementary teacher for deprived non-
English speaking (Puerto Rican)
youngsters of kindergarten age; she &
Shep were accepted for Peace
Corps duty in Nigeria but decided
against it because of the impending
conflict at that time; remembers
Berkeley House, Senora Cobb and Mr.
Pilsbury.

Elinor Stone

Married to Jeffrey Peter Ross on June
5, 1966; 96 Brook Road, Sharon; son,
Peter Eben (Dec. 21, 1968); University
of Hartford Art School; is presently
a housewife enjoying painting, skiing,
Women's American Art and her son;
remembers commuting to and from
Lasell.

Marjorie Story

Married to Robert L. Brown on June 18,
1967; 45 Bay View Road, Great Neck,
Ipswich; son — Robert L. born Feb.
25, 1970; graduated from Boston Uni-
versity with a B.S. in Elem. Education



in 1967; presently at home after two
years of teaching first grade, enjoying
swimming and boating; remembers
long lasting friendships.

Elizabeth Tomlinson

Married to Edward J. Bill on August 28,
1965; 91 Bainbridge Rd., West
Hartford, Conn.; received her B.A.
from the Rhode Island College and her
M.A. from the University of Hartford;
is presently a French teacher; lived and
studied in Paris and will be spending
July and August this summer in
Europe.

Joan Vaidulas

175 Summer Street, Maiden; is
presently a secretary for Polaroid Corp.;
enjoys sewing, skiing & tennis; in
August of 1967 took a 3-week tour of
Europe.

Susan Warnick

Married to John Anthony Krueger on
March 17, 1970; 2 South Road, Apt,
I.S. Harrison, New York; is presently a
secretary for IBM; honeymooned in
Jamaica; remembers all the good
friends she made.

Linda Weiner

16 Addington Road, Brookline; is
presently a Marketing Research
Assistant for Becker Research; enjoys
skiing, sewing and reading; has
taken trips to California, Canada and
Puerto Rico.

Lynn Wemple

Married to Robert Howard Cooley on
June 29, 1968; 4600 Beverly Drive,
Dallas, Texas; received his B.A. from
the University of Denver; is presently a
housewife and is a substitute teacher
at a school for the deaf, does com-
munity volunteer work, and spent a
month in Australia in January of 1970.

Marjorie E. Wiley

452 Park Drive, Boston; is presently a
bank teller; enjoys skiing, skindiving
and sewing.

Annette Willock

342 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston;
is presently a Merchant Representative
Master Charge Department, New
England Merchants National Bank.



Martha Wright

Married to Thomas Bishop Potter on
July 13, 1968; 299 Park Road,
Hamden, Connecticut; presently an
R.N. at Yale New Haven Hospital and
working in the operating room; hobbies
are camera work and camping;
remembers the security of being at a
small college, the old tradition of
senior houses, the friends, the beauty
of the campus spread out with a great
deal of New England charm, most
outstanding memory is of her small
nursing class of nine.

Ellen Stanley

Married to Thomas N. Lucas on
November 22, 1963; 50 Blue Ridge
Circle, Cheshire, Connecticut; sons,
Thomas (4) and Brian (14 months).

Susan Yenkin

Married to Alan Dennis Leffler on June
11, 1967; 125 Myrtle Street, Boston;
received her B.S. in Ed. from State
College at Boston and is in the
process of getting her Masters in
Counseling at Suffolk University;
presently a 5th grade teacher at
Academy Hill School in the City of
Boston; went to Europe for 1 1 weeks
on her honeymoon; "I frequently
reminisce about my Lasell Life. In this
time of strike and protests we are
constantly amazed at the simplicity
(or just plain unawareness) of our
lives at Lasell. This was especially
prevalent when Lasell was on strike. I
guess it was nice while it lasted
although we were not aware of it."

Carol Zall

Married to Alan Jay Lincoln on March
21; 1967; 90 Spring Street, Amherst;
daughter — Alisa Kim (born July 11,
1968); received her B.A. from the
University of Massachusetts; is
presently a housewife; Alan is studying
for his PhD. with a year to go; enjoys
skiing, tennis and outdoor sport,
collects primitives (early American
type); most outstanding memory — crew
races; many great memories of the
fun in Draper.



21



Class Notes



'08

Florence Stark Burnham x-'08
writes from Naples (Fla.): "Read con-
stantly — select a subject — read all I
can find out about it — my latest in-
terest is 16th Century England."

'10

Dear Classmates:

The 1910 Class Letter is here, until
our Class Secretary, Marion Hale
Bottomley, returns from her trip to
Florida.

She had no response from a few
members of our Class, many of us
are over eighty and avoiding extra
responsibilities — but those who did
write, would prove stimulating to any
age group.

Marion's letter included a picture
of her and her older sister admiring
one of their father's famous Hale-
Haven peaches!

Julia ter Kuile Brown writes her
son, Dwight, is deeply involved in
electronics. Barton was decorated by
the Belgium government for his work
there for General Motors.

Tot McLean Hunt seems to have
found the secret to perpetual motion.
Her letters and travels and family are
a joy to all of us in 1910. A recent
issue of "House and Gardens" had
an article and lovely colored illus-
trations of her son's home overlook-
ing the golf course in Dallas.

Mildred Snyder Grant lives in New
Orleans. I call her our philosopher;




her letters are a study in depth on
the problems and joys of today's
living. Her son, Walter, Jr., is a De-
signing Engineer particularly inter-
ested in Nuclear Submarine work.
Her daughter, Mildred (Grant Smith
x-'41) has two fine sons. They still
live in Beaumont, Texas.

Julia Hamilton Peters and Julius
"have traveled a lot, seen many
countries and have too many homes
for my satisfaction." But her "gal-
lery" of pictures proves a fine, happy
family surround her and her husband.

Irma Levi Levy's letters reveal her
charm and gracious acceptance of
responsibility to today's problems.
Pride in her children is obvious and
heartfelt.

Mildred Goodall Fairbanks leads a
fascinating life in Florida — she and
her children and grandchildren be-
long in a fairy tale!

JO WOODWARD RAND

'16

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Mabel Straker Kimball,
whose husband, Richard, passed
away on March 16, 1970 in Clear-
water, Florida. The Kimballs have
three children, William of Hingham,
Florence of South Hadley, and Abi-
gail of London, England.

Adolphia Garnsey Ettinger admits:
"Now that we are retired, I am too
busy to think! My hobbies are every-
thing that comes to hand — and that's
plenty!"

Vera Willis Warfield is a research
assistant at the University of Colo-
rado. She enjoys her work on a spe-
cial program authorized by H.E.W. in
the field of library research. An early
December vacation took her to Lon-
don for two weeks of theatre and the
shops.

'18

The Class extends sincere sympa-
thy to Esther Norcross Dougherty



whose husband passed away in Feb-
ruary 1970.

Grace Tredway Davies, serving for
the fifth year as housemother of
Kappa Alpha Theta at Ohio Wesleyan
University, "loves working with young
people." She remembers most pleas-
antly the three years she spent at
Lasell and continues to keep in touch
with many of the friends she made
during her student days.

Leontine Goodman Thalheimer's
special hobby is cooking and col-
lecting cookbooks. She has attended
gourmet cooking classes in New
York.

Harriet Fera French x-'18 includes
among her Lasell "impressions":
"The personalities of certain teach-
ers, particularly Miss Margaret Rand,
was of great importance to me. The
one year I attended a small institu-
tion, sandwiched in between a large
Chicago high school and a tremen-
dous University, was invaluable to
me in developing self-confidence."

'20

Helen Balcom Roberts operates a
kennel in Albion, N.Y. Toy Fox Ter-
riers and Boston Terriers are her
specialty.

Margaret Perley Downey, staff
member of the Glen Ellyn (III.) Public
Library, declares: "I have lived in
California, Massachusetts, Michigan,
Indiana and Illinois, and have always
found Lasell alumnae as a basis for
new friendships." Margaret's son,
Douglas, is editor-in-chief of the New
Standard Encyclopedia.

'22

Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker attend-
ing award night at the (Watsonville,
Calif.) Chamber of Commerce, was
greatly surprised when called to ac-
cept the award for "The Organiza-
tion of the Year" — her pet charity
the Service League of the Watson-



Warren Carberg, instructor in English, with Tom Wessel-
man's "Still Life No. 25"



During the year the art department arranged for exhibits in the library that
offered a change of pace for campus art viewers. An exhibit on loan from the
Brandeis Rose Gallery in the fall featured contemporary painters and abstrac-
tionists Grace Hartigan, Tom Wesselman, James Rosenquist, Larry Rivers,
Yvaral, Neil Williams, and Will lasley. It was followed by an exhibit of graphic
arts by Tufts art instructor Milton Johnson, and later by two exhibits of
senior art and a photographic exhibit entitled "The Altered Image," featuring
unusual techniques in the medium by four University of Iowa graduate students
of photography. Photos shown on succeeding pages of this section were taken
at the first exhibit of senior art hung in the library this spring.



22



ville Community Hospital. A most ac-
tive Pink Lady, she was President for
the 1968-69 term. Have learned, in a
round-robin sort of way, that Phyllis
plans to come East in June to attend
a wedding. We hope to start plans for
our 50th in 1972 fast heading this
way!

Louise Stevens Prince, after many
happy years as secretary to the
Principal of South Portland (Maine)
High School, has recently returned
from a winter vacation in Venice,
Florida, with a side trip to Nassau.

Peg Reid Perry was off once more
to spend April in Delray Beach (Fla.)
with Dot Ely Bigham '21. Peg is still
a great golfer, hospital volunteer and
ever-so-proud grandmother of five.

Dot Caldwell Jordan is always on
the go — either to New Jersey to be
with her family, or to visit her sister
in Northern Maine — Island Falls.

Libby Madeira Campbell and her
husband enjoyed a two-month return
vacation in Africa, where they found
many changes. The remainder of the
winter was spent in Florida.

Helene Grashorne Dickson and
Laurence, who spent the late Fall in
Florida, are now on a business trip
to California. Their summer plans
include a holiday at Chatham on
Cape Cod.

Marjorie Gifford Grimm recently
visited Theresa Thompson Osborne,
Mary Lou Weymouth Thompson and
Harriette Case Bidwell. Earlier in the
year, Marge and George vacationed
in Hawaii.

To Harriette Case Bidwell we ex-
tend sincere sympathy in the loss of
her husband. Harold passed away in
early December.

Cecile Loomis Steubing writes
from a new address — Route #2, Box
388-B, Leander, Texas: "My husband
and I moved from our Houston home
in June to try rural life for retirement.
We built and settled in Leander; are
trying to beautify the grounds — deer,
raccoons are no help. We overlook
Lake Travis."

Eleanor F. Wheeler x-'22, owner of
a general advertising agency, is an
employer member of the Advisory
Council, Massachusetts Division of
Employment Security and a member
of the Governor's Advisory Commit-
tee to the Bureau for Women, Mass.
Division of Commerce and Develop-
ment. Eleanor lives at 77 Big Blue
Drive, Milton, Mass. 02186.



As for yours truly, more notes have
reached me inquiring "why no '22
news?" How can I do a good job if
you don't write! I still find each day
full to the brim with hospital volunteer
work, church league projects, three
lovely grandchildren and my two men
folks.

MARJORIE LOVERING HARRIS
Secretary

'24

Helen Earl Potter divides her time
between Stonington, Connecticut and
Pompano Beach, Florida. She is a
Justice of Peace in the state of Con-
necticut; has been a social adviser
for debutante parties and weddings
in and around New England and
Westchester. Helen belongs to the
Stonington, Camden (Maine) and
Westerly (R.I.) historical societies.

The Robert B. Hannas (Elizabeth
Anderson) have accomplished a most
interesting "retirement" project — to-
gether they have published a 264-
page Indiana guide book, "Hoosier
Guide". We highly recommend this
for all alumnae "motor" vacationists.

Matilda Daugherty Linn recalls:
"Two of the happiest years of my
life were spent at Lasell — the Home
Management course was excellent.
Can truthfully say I benefit from it
daily!" Matilda has three children
and four grandchildren.

'26

Hazel Kramer O'Donnell is admin-
istrative secretary for the Council on
Russian and East European Studies
at Yale University.

Mabel Michell Pyott devotes much
time to numerous community services
in the Fort Lauderdale community.
She is a volunteer lecturer for school
children; is a member of the League
of Women Voters; serves as a hostess
at a Halfway Home for mental patients
discharged from the South Florida
State Mental Hospital.

Valentine Murdock Taggart x-'26
is interested in the promotion of
American Youth Hostels. Valentine
has three children — a married daugh-
ter, a married son; the younger son,
Jonathan, is a college student.

Kathryn Moore Silverwood and
husband are looking forward to a
summer vacation trip to Germany and
Austria. Kay's #1 hobby is GOLF.



Frances Hall Anderson is super-
visor of music for the Bristol (Conn.)
School Department.

'28

Anna Rainey Bonner x-'28 is look-
ing forward to November 1970 — that
month brings retirement for her hus-
band; they plan Florida living.

Phyllis Applin Howe x-'28 writes
from 8 Church Street, Belfast, Maine:
"We retired here to enjoy the out-of-
doors, especially the water — we have
a boat and explore the nearby
islands."

Helen Tracy Shaw and husband are
building a vacation cottage at Lake
Norman, North Carolina.

'30

Dorothy Young Heath's winter va-
cation address is: Bar Harbour Apart-
ments, 86 MacFarlane Drive, Delray
Beach, Florida.

Martha Adams Hindman is secre-
tary to the Teacher Personnel Direc-
tor of the Toledo Public Schools; she
devotes spare time to the two grand-
children.

Beatrice Alderman Nelson writes:
"over the years I kept busy in my
professional capacity as a Registered
Nurse — in Boston Hospitals — the




Belinda Walker '70 with Yvaral's "Variation on the
Square"



23



Camden Community Hospital and
more recently, at the Bancroft School,
Owl's Head, Maine".

Elinor Taylor writes: "I'm enjoying
my first year of retirement after 35
years of teaching. Have served in all
offices in both local school teachers
association and district superinten-
dency; member of Lambda chapter
of Delta Kappa Gamma — interna-
tional society for women educators."

Ruth Richardson Pease x-'30 oc-
casionally does part-time private
nursing duty. Summer vacations are
spent in Maine.

Elizabeth Hanmer MacCutcheon is
Administrative Secretary of Trinity
Episcopal Church, Wethersfield,
Conn.

Gladys Nettleton Beaumont x-'30
is employed as teller at the Second
National Bank of New Haven in
Guilford (Conn.). She has one daugh-
ter, Gail; two married sons; a grand-
child, John Peter.



'32

Barbara Cowdrey Alexik, who lives
in Stillwater, N. Y., participates in
many community activities. Currently
she is President of the Trustees of
the local Library.

Jane Grant Hibbeler is a substi-
tute high school teacher in Belton,
Texas.

Jane Ellison Ragan x-'32 is now
living at 505 Washington St., Auburn,
Mass. She is Elementary Music
Supervisor for the Dudley public
schools.

Rachel DeWolf has returned to the
Boston area. She is now associated
with Little, Brown and Company; her
apartment address is 121 St. Stephen
Street, Boston.



'34

From Mabelle Hickcox Camp: "Our
vacations through 1971 will probably
be spent in California. Our daughter
is living at Berkeley, while her hus-
band is studying for his Doctorate."

Doris Nesbitt Riesdorph was wid-
owed in April 1966. She is now Mrs.
Walter C. Robinson; lives at 33
Howell Lane, Riverhead, N. Y.

Emily Cleaves Martin and husband
operate a successful clock business
in Gardner, (Mass.). They manufac-



ture grandmother and grandfather
clocks.

Alice Floyd Rice is the fourth gene-
ration owner of Floyd's Store, Man-
chester-by-the-Sea, Mass.

'36

Dorothea Eburne MacLeod and
Selma Amdur Heringman are asso-
ciated with travel bureaus — Dorothea
is an agent with the Minuteman
Travel Service of Westboro (Mass.);
"Tommy" is a partner of Zenith
Travel Service in Los Angeles.

Hilda Theurer Guidrey and hus-
band have recently returned from a
winter tour of Japan and Hong Kong.

Marian Burke Walkey is the proud
grandmother of five — "including twin
girls".

Althea Marder Pond x-'36 is
Treasurer of the Plainfield (N. J.)
Garden Club.



'38

The Class extends sympathy to
Betty Yeuell Collins whose father
passed away late in 1969.

Arlene Wishart Sylvester shares
news from Dot Woodard Grindell:
"Daughter, Jean, is living in Syracuse
— her husband will complete his Doc-
torate in September. Paul (U.S.N.)
is at Radar School in Great Lakes.
Barry lives in South Yarmouth — he
has six children. Lloyd and David
live at home. Wilbur and I are look-
ing forward to a brief winter vaca-
tion in Florida."

Eleanore Loeffler Olsen tells us:
"I have always been interested in
antiques and am an avid collector.
Started doing one antique show 12
years ago as a hobby; today I am
doing shows in Connecticut, N.Y.
and N.J. It is a thoroughly enjoyable
hobby."

Peggy Williams Peterson is a sec-
retary of the Franklin Bank, St. Al-
bans, Vt. She has three daughters —
Karen 22; Susan 20; Pamela 14; son,
David, is 17.

Eleanor Skinner Stoughton has a
new address — P.O. Box 1099, New-
port Beach, Calif.

Until June 1970, Jane Veazie Nel-
son x-'38 will be Down-Under." She
and Dr. Nelson's sabbatical year will
include holiday excursions to Japan
and New Zealand.



Edwina Kelley Taylor x-'38 is em-
ployed as school nurse in the Mt.
Pleasant Special School District of
Wilmington, Del. Son, Alden III, at-
tends graduate school at Carnegie-
Mellon; daughters, Mary Beth and
Jane are students at Marjorie Web-
ster Junior College.

Sally Guerin Dare x-'38 is co-
owner of private nursery and kinder-
garten schools in Melbourne, Fla.

Yvonne Corrigan Boddy is indeed
a great representative for Maine's
publicity bureau: "Our summer camp
is located on Togue Pond — 18 miles
from Millinocket. It is at the foot of
majestic Mt. Katahdin — one of the
most beautiful spots in this part of
the country."

Alice-Kristine Lockwood Leach is
Field Director for the Connecticut
Trails Council Girl Scouts, New
Haven.

Ginny Squiers Read's Christmas
letter reads in part: "The 'Winds of
Change' have been rustling the Reads
through the plains of Illinois to the
marshes of the southlands during
1969. Bob and I were transferred to
Tampa, Florida by the Aetna Insur-
ance Company in April; Pris moved
in June to Chicago from Pennsyl-
vania; Bill and Nita pulled up stakes
in Illinois and moved to St. Francis-
ville, Louisiana where Bill is one of
the managers of Farrar Farms, Inc.
Charles is the only one who did not
make a drastic move, staying within
the city of Chicago and just changing
apartments.



24




"Last Christmas was a happy time
for us as Charles spent the holidays
with us on his way from Chicago to
a sales meeting in Massachusetts;
Priscilla came from Pennsylvania to
be with us; then went on to Chicago
for several interviews. At this time,
she told us of her plans to move to
Chicago, to take a vacation trip to
Scandinavia in May and to be mar-
ried in the summer. The wedding —
on July 12 in the First Presbyterian
Church in Chicago — was an unusual
one for our family in that it was an
interracial affair. We are very happy
and proud of our son-in-law, John
Leroy Parker, who is completing
work for a master's degree in Busi-
ness Administration at the Univer-
sity of Chicago while holding down
a full-time job.

"Bob and I are now settled into
our new home in Tampa and are just
as involved as ever. We are both
members of the church choir, I am
secretary in the College of Medicine
at the University of Florida; we both
are continuing our education — Bob
is taking a CPCU course in insurance;
I, a basic psychology course at
U.S.F.

"Should any Lasell friends be com-
ing this way to get away from the
ice and snow, come by or call us at
933-2292."

'40

Florence Evans McLaughlin, a sub-
stitute teacher in the Randolph (Ver-
mont) school system, is a member
of the Vermont Historical Society; ex-
hibits annually at the Norwich Uni-
versity Art Show.




Barbara Clarke Keenan's daughter
Bonnie is attending Green Mountain
Junior College.

Madelyne Rose Browne has a
choice possession — a splinter from
the Crow's Nest which was blown
down in the 1939 Hurricane!

One of Cynthia Davis Carson's fa-
vorite hobbies is gardening — "don't
stay home long enough to accom-
plish much. This year I was on a
400-mile canoe trip while squirrels
ate the ripe peaches."

Jeanne Hubbard Brooks now lives
on Liberty Street, Chester, Conn. She
is a member of various Committees
of the U.S. Power Squadron Auxili-
ary; she and her husband are avid
fishermen.

Ruth MacDowell Stonemetz is sec-
retary with a Newton investment firm;
her husband, Charles Stonemetz, is
editor of the weekly Villager.

Lucy Harrison Eimer is a charge
nurse at the Robincroft Rest Home,
Pasadena, California. Daughter Mary
Lou is 20; twins Nancy and Sally, 18;
son Bill, 16.

Barbara Fales Furlong is now as-
sociated with Gamwell & Ingraham,
Inc., realtors, Cranston, Rhode Island.

Nancy Rudy Howard is Manager
of the Binghamton (N.Y.) General
Hospital Gift Shop.

Mary Alice Houghton Menger and
husband manage the Continental
Travels, a Lakeland, Florida agency.

Good news from Carol "Frosty"
Birdseye MacDonald: "Plan to return
for our 30th Reunion!"

Janice Donavan Neal is "happy to
report: Husband Frank, a Harvard
Business School alumnus, is a Direc-
tor of John Hancock Advisory, Inc.,
a C.F.A. Analyst, Director of the
South Boston Savings Bank, Trustee
of Permanent Funds and Chairman of
the Finance Committee of the
Newtonville Central Congregational
Church. Older son, Frank Getchell
III, and wife have given us two grand-
daughters. Jonathan Hines Neal, 22,
is married and attends Boston Uni-
versity School of Theology. Our 17-
year-old daughter, a senior at New-
ton High School, enjoyed a five-week
tour of Europe with the Boston Con-
servatory singing group. We enjoy
summers in Maine."

Arnold Burrough, Jr., only son of
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Burrough (Ruth
Bowman) was killed in an automobile



accident on February 11, 1970. The
Burroughs have two daughters; the
younger, Nancy, was graduated from
Lasell in 1965.



'42

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Arline Kreider Roberts,
whose husband, Bob, was drowned
in an April fishing accident.

Jean Barnes Butts has forwarded
notes from the following:
From Trudy Ruch Kauffman: "Our
oldest daughter, Nancy, was married
in November. In December, my hus-
band, 'Sully' went into the yachting
business at Marina delRey; we plan
to be active in sailing this summer.
Charles and Joan attend the Univer-
sity of California, and Susan will
graduate from Campbell Hall Episco-
pal Academy in June. Miss Mac
MacClymon was the highlight of our
March luncheon of the Southern
California Club. She looked just
marvelous; brought us up-to-date on
Lasell. Mary Young Jacobs '48 and I
have had a wonderful four-day visit;
recently Muriel Stark Goldsmith and
I lunched together. Why don't some
of my classmates call when they
come to California?"

From Ruth Roughgarden Frank:
"Have been simply ashamed of our
class. What has happened? My news
is ordinary, I am sure. My daughter,
Ruth, graduated in June '69 from
Wellesley (philosophy major); on
November 28th was married to David
Morine, Amherst '67, U. Va. '70. They
live and work in New York City. Son
Drew is anxiously awaiting college
acceptance. Helen Louise (13) at-
tends Glen Rock Junior High, and
keeps us busy with her show pony
and riding. When in Florida, I visited
Barbara McDowell Lee — who is just
fine; also try to keep in touch via
mail with my Lasell roommate, Bea
Lewis Potter. Best wishes to all."

From Jean Hardy Canedy: "Older
daughter Ann (Canedy Parisien, La-
sell '66) made me a grandmother two
years ago — and I love it! All one
hears about enjoying grandchildren
is true. Son Scott will enter Williams
College in September, that leaves
Susan with us for a year before she
takes off for college. If anyone is
traveling the Mohawk Trail, Route #2,



25




do stop at the Golden Eagle Gift
Shop to say 'Hello'."
From Helen Cizek Niedringhaus:
"After having lived in Pound Ridge
for twenty-two years, we are moving!
Our new address — as of August 1st
— will be: 6007 N. E. Windemere
Road, Seattle, Wash. 98105. We have
bought a beautiful house on Lake
Washington, just above the Univer-
sity. There are lovely plantings, a
huge dock with diving board, a tennis
court (which needs some repair) —
we are all looking forward to this
new adventure. Billy is in his second
year at the University of Dubuque;
Karl is a freshman at Jacksonville
University; Sandra is in the 8th grade;
Nancy, in the 5th. I keep busy with
Girl Scouts, Garden Club and various
other projects."

To quote the Waltham News
Tribune for December 22, 1969:
"Christmas came early for Claire
Nolan (H.S. '42). The Waltham
schoolteacher, one of the outstand-
ing woman golfers at Woodland Golf
Club has received notification that
her handicap has been lowered to
five strokes. She had been carrying
a seven handicap.

This makes her eligible for the
United States Women's Amateur
Championship to be held sometime
in August at WeeBurn C.C. in Darien,
Conn. A former club champion at
both Woodland and Marshfield, Claire
has been a perennial runnerup in the
South Shore Championship. She has
been a finalist three times.



Claire is one of 400 women
teachers of golf throughout the en-
tire country invited to attend the
National Golf Foundation's seminar
for teachers. There will be two semi-
nars held in the United States — one
in the East on August 10-14 at Pine
Needles C.C, Southern Pines, N. C.
and the other in the west at Carefree,
Arizona.

Claire, in addition to her duties as
a physical education teacher at
Central Junior High, continues to
coach two Catholic High School
girls' basketball teams.

Claire also has found time to
referee games. She was recently
made an honorary lifetime member of
the Boston Board of Officials."

Jane O'Rourke Gaffney is office
manager for the North Shore Pedi-
atric Association in D'anvers.

Jessie Dobson Salmon teaches
ninth-grade English in Vero Beach,
Florida. Summer vacations are spent
at Groton Long Point, Conn. Jessie's
oldest daughter, Carol, works in
Houston, Texas; Jeanne is Mrs.
Douglas Bienek of Westfield, Mass.;
William, Jr. attends the University of
West Florida, and Diane, 16, is a
junior at the Vero Beach High
School.

Jane Chafee Swetland's daughter
Ann, a graduate of Bennett and Case
Western Reserve University, was
married in June 1969.

Margaret Sennott Iris has two sons
in service. Scott, 24, is stationed at
a Colorado Air Force Base, Ron, 20,
at Cincpac Headquarters in Hawaii.
Cynthia, 15, is at home.

Marilyn Crumb Linendoll has four
daughters — Jennifer, Marilyn, Janet
and Carol.

Medical Secretary Doris Bracher
Jenkins writes: "Thank heaven for
my Lasell training. Even though I
had not used typing in 25 years — it
came back very quickly."

Mary Darling Johnson devotes five
hours each week at a Worcester,
Mass. school for handicapped chil-
dren.

Jeanne Schwarz Walsh is a mem-
ber of the Faculty of Roger Williams
College in Providence, Rhode Island.
She is an instructor in Sociology.

Suzanne Haynes Murray "drove
through the Lasell campus two years
ago — found it much more attractive
than in my days at Woodland Park."

Many of Dorothy Winchester



Mason's piano students "have been
chosen most outstanding in the
Kentucky Music Teachers Association
festivals; several have contributed to
major music in college." Dorothy's
husband is a music professor at
Murray State University, Murray,
Kentucky.

'44

Greetings to the Class of 1944!

Our 25th Reunion, at one time so
remote, has long since come and
gone. Present at the June Luncheon
were: Evelyn Allen Clune, June
Carew Mange, Virginia Wolfe Per-
kins, Dorothy Tobin Staffier, Sally
Gray Hill, Vivian Snow Ohlhorst,
Joan Mills Barry, Alice Crosby Mar-
tin, Ruth Perkins Goodwin, Mar-
guerite Portmore Scheuerman, Mar-
guerite Revene Winans, Elfreda Reck
Dubin, Betty Fleer Cooper, Lorrayne
Hron Reynolds, Jean Campbell, Shir-
ley Haviland Woody, Elizabeth Bur-
pee Crooker, Claire McCreery Sim-
mons, Kathryn Evans Downs and
Elizabeth Rhind Mills.

In the evening, Jane Maynard Rob-
bins and Faith Taylor Maloney joined
us for cocktails at the Wellesley home
of Betty Rhind Mills; then on to
Valle's for dinner. And before the
25th Reunion for the Class of 1944
was over, I found myself the new
class secretary.

Thanks to Jane Maynard Robbins,
we learn that Edna Barker Nelson
wanted to attend Reunion, but fam-
ily commitments came first. Elizabeth
Foss Holden, who lives in Hyde Park,
Vt., keeps in touch with Mary Martin
Ross. Dorothy Fuchs Magee is mar-
ried to a minister, and they vacation
in Maine every summer. Jo Leroy
Bramm and doctor-husband live in
Huntsville, Ala. Jo is active in politics
on the state level, is interested in
gourmet cooking, and she and hus-
band do a great deal of traveling.
Shirley Haviland Woody's daughter,
a sophomore at B.U., had a lovely
Christmas gift from a neighboring
family for whom she baby-sits . . .
a trip to Europe. Son, Luke, is very
musical, has a fine singing voice,
and will be off to College this year.
Katy Cogswell Darnton and Jack have
returned to Missouri, after a "sab-
batical" in Europe. Their oldest
daughter, Barbie, is a junior at the
U. of Mo. Our oldest daughter gradu-



26



ated from Lasell last June, just in
time for Reunion, which was a lovely
way to observe the 25th. Jackie has
since transferred to Hillsdale College
in Michigan. We ski and travel when
we can, and fish every summer for
salmon in the Columbia River.

This is where my information runs
out ... for the moment . . . but of
course, that can be remedied. Won't
you drop a note when you can, so
that we can all share the news of
what is happening to you, that in
one way or another touches all the
members of the Class of 1944.

Best wishes to you all,
FREDA RECK DUBIN

Carolyn Hill Plumer has been
named Publicity and Public Relations
Director of the YWCA of the Oranges.
Carolyn writes: "Our two and one-
half years spent in the Chicago area
were exciting and eventful. One of
the highlights was the Lasell group
which meets regularly — even through
the summer. Betty Lloyd Fritch '38
and I drove all over the area to
meetings.

"We returned to Maplewood last
March and how easy to come back
to a place where one has lived be-
fore. Our next-door neighbors are
the Robsons, whose daughter,
Margaret (Robson Priddy), graduated
from Lasell in 1954. Another neighbor
is Agnes Sligh Turnbull, mother of
Martha Turnbull O'Hearn '47.

"It's great being East again, but
am truly grateful for our wonderful
mid-West experiences — new friends
and getting acquainted again with
old ones, including Ellie Millard
Parsons '43. I enjoy the LEAVES
and news of Lasell's progress."
Carolyn's address: 40 Claremont
Avenue, Maplewood, N.J. 07040.

Kenneth Charles Schuberth, son
of Sue Lange Riddlemoser, and Miss
Martha Payne Nangeroni were
married on January 3, 1970 in Bound
Brook, New Jersey.

Edna Barker Nelson writes: "Be-
cause we have a second home in an
all-year-found location — Croydon,
N.H. — we ski winters and enjoy
Lake Sunapee during the summer
months. We bought an old farm-
house — the restoration and renova-
tion has been a family project — and
our recreation."

Patty Frangedakis Pitcher has
moved to 86 Nottingham Road,



Auburn, Maine. She is a physical
education instructor in the Auburn
School Department. Older daughter,
Nancy, has been accepted for Sep-
tember '70 admission to Lasell;
Jennifer attends Gould Academy,
Bethel, Maine.



'46

Helen Orfl Toothaker has been
appointed assistant manager of the
Wilton (Maine) office of Depositors
Trust Company.

Elizabeth Kendall Hunter lists
several current community interests:
Treasurer-Captain Hubbard Burrows
Chapter DAR; Membership Chair-
man-Clarendon Hills Center, Infant
Welfare Society of Chicago; Secre-
tary-Episcopal Churchwomen; Camp
Fire Leader-fifth grade girls. The
Hunter's vacation home is located in
Estes Park, Colorado.

Irene Tomasek Charbonneau
teaches Secretarial Science in the
Webster (Mass.) public schools.

Monique Ducharme is Assistant
Treasurer in the City Co-Operative
Bank in Holyoke (Mass.).

Betty Renison Ballard is a free-
lance artist — advertising layout and
illustrations — for the Valdes Studio
of Westbury (N.Y.).

Betty Simmons Kurkulos lives at
517 Second Street, Fall River, Mass.
A graduate of Boston University's
School of Social Work, she is coun-
sellor in the Fall River School Depart-
ment, and a part-time case worker
for the Fall River Deaconness Home.

Marian (Parsons) and Jack
Theriault are the proprietors of The
Quail Home and Garden Center in
Raleigh, North Carolina. They offer
a complete line of housewares, gift-
ware and lawn and garden supplies,
as well as leisure time equipment
and decorator needs.

Molly Ing Louis describes herself
as a "typical housewife". Her three
sons are Stanley 17, Richard 13 and
James 11.

Audrey Day Norris participates in
various Bronxville activities. She is
a Board member of the League of
Women Voters; an active member of
the Bronxville League for Service;
and serves on numerous committees
of Christ Episcopal Church.

Dorothy Crathem French is a
proud grandmother. Tamah is the




year-old daughter of son Willard.
Dorothy has two daughters, Pene-
lope and Melissa; younger son,
James, is 16. Dorothy is a secretary
at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.



'48

Ann Myers Back keeps more than
busy "raising a growing family —
four sons, numerous rabbits, ham-
sters two house dogs and a house
cat."

Jacquelyn Abbott Jones, a Jackson
(N.H.) Realtor is presently serving as
Director of the New Hampshire Real
Estate Boards; is President of the
White Mountain Realtors.

Harriet Markham Wedeman de-
clares: "I have not been in Boston
since my Lasell days. We do travel a
good deal — often meet Easterners
— all with high regard for Lasell. Am
proud that I attended the College."

Jean Heagy Proctor has a new
address — 4044 Boca Bay Drive,
Dallas, Texas.

Ann Truex Dickinson and family
live in Cary, III. Son, Tom 18, is a
pre-dental student at Wisconsin State
University; Debbie 16 and Nancy 14,
attend Cary Grove High School.

Pauline Fitzwilliam Gallagher, an
elementary teacher in the Hingham



27



school system, is now working to-
wards an E.D.D. in Guidance at
Northeastern University.

Jane Hamilton Landenberger
writes: "We are all — husband three
sons daughter — great campers —
prefer the back woods to campsites."

Janecks Naess Madsen brings us
up-to-date: "After graduating from
Lasell, I returned to Norway; found
immediate employment as a Nor-
wegan-English stenographer and
quickly advanced to private secretary
to the Vice President of a large
engineering firm. Later worked in
Paris for an importing firm. Since my
marriage, I have lived in New Canaan
(Conn.) where I do volunteer work
with various local organizations. Our
daughter, Mette, is 14; sons Erling
and Peter, 13 and 8, respectively."

Constance O'Neill Teta is an agent
for a Port Washington (N.Y.) Real
Estate firm.

Dorothy Hayes Kattell manages a
small farmbeef cattle and horses —
in West Salem, Ohio.

Norma Jean Noyes Bouchard is
more than delighted "with our pur-
chase of land in Duchess County,
N.Y. It provides an ideal place to
enjoy nature — the land has a stream
and a waterfall; a great variety of
trees and wildflowers."

'50

Esther Snowdon Richmond is a
Home Economics teacher in the Mat-
Su Borough Schools of Palmer,
Alaska. Mary Louise Dunham Weyand
teaches a combined first and second
grade class in Passaic, N.J.

Nancy Burrows is an executive
secretary in the Boston office of the



....



Putnam Management Company.
Marjorie Dow, a secretary with IBM
in Essex Junction, sends this new
address: 32 Sunset Drive, Burlington,
Vt. Cynthia Butler Barnes is secre-
tary to the Principal and Superinten-
dant of the Petersham (Mass.) Center
School.

Marilyn Morse Harris x-'50 and
family spend summer vacations at
Lake Rabun, Lakemont, Ga. They are
looking forward to a European trip
this spring.

In July 1969, Virginia Davis Stark-
weather x-'50 and family moved from
Duxbury, Mass. to 644 Olean
Boulevard, Port Charlotte, Fla.

Regina Kempton Reynolds x-'50
has "been active in fund raising for
Arnold Hall — a conference and edu-
cational center in Pembroke, Mass."

Nancy Frank Daly is Rental Man-
ager for Homerica Inc. of New York
City.

Barbara McCooe Robbins now
lives at 103 Seminole Drive in Vin-
cennes, Indiana. Her "spare" time
is devoted to dressmaking — for her-
self and three daughters — Jill, Jan
and Penny.

Virginia Hibbert Weldon and hus-
band and family spend the summer-
time cruising the St. Lawrence and
Canadian waterways on their 48
foot houseboat.

There once was a family named Noel
Who couldn't decide where to dwell
Their friends were all dizzy
And the mailmen quite busy
Will they stay a proper time????
Who can tell????

. . . and this from Mary Jane Corrallo
Noel, who sends the most recent ad-
dress: 473 Montrose Drive, Beacons-
field, P.Q., Canada. M. J. is hoping
to be in Auburndale for Reunion.



'52

Born: To Joanne Purcell Brooker, a
fourth child, third daughter,
Kristine Eunice, on May 18,
1970.

Eleanor Sommer O'Keefe is a sec-
retary at WBZ-TV in Boston, Mass.;
Carolyn Gould McKinney is a medi-
cal secretary in Rockland, Mass.

Joan Dunlap Fullerton is an allergy
nurse in Amarillo, Texas.

Janet Merserve Ratteay is a clin-
ical instructor at the Addison Gilbert
Hospital.



Diane Vail Hayduk is a medical
secretary in Bronxville, N.Y.

Lois Hickey Treacy reports a most
pleasant vacation in Italy last sum-
mer. Before returning to Scarsdale,
Lois, her husband and two daughters
enjoyed a month's visit with relatives
in London.

Barbara Magnaghi Dunn and Pat
Moulton Cudmore are both Assistant
Treasurers. Barbara works in Brattle-
boro, Vermont; Pat in Brockton,
Mass.

Dorothy Webb Slack is Physical
Education instructor at the Burling-
ton High School in Burlington, Ver-
mont.

Carole French Willis writes from
Japan (VQ-One Fleet Post Office,
San Francisco, Calif. 96601); "Have
done much work for both Navy Re-
lief and the Red Cross. Here in Japan
my Red Cross work is mostly con-
cerned with visiting the wounded in
our hospitals. I am a volunteer En-
glish teacher and work with two and
four year old Japanese children."

Sue Baney Berghaus sends a new

address 500 Cape Avenue, Cape

May Point, N. J. 08212, and adds: "In
November, my family moved to Cape
May Point (another three hours fur-
ther from Lasell). We have purchased
a general store in this family resort
community. We are just a block — in
one direction — from Delaware Bay;
two blocks from the ocean; two
blocks from a good-sized fresh water
lake. Nearby is an audubon sanc-
tuary — a stop-over in the migration
of many Eastern birds."



'54

Weddings:

Patricia Flett Davidson and
Kenneth R. Lowe on May 16,
1970 in Homestead, Fla.

Emily Betts Reilly sends her new
address: 2460 Rockknoll Drive, Con-
ley, Georgia. She still remembers
most pleasantly the 1954 European
trip with former Dean Ruth Rothen-
burger Harris.

Carol Sharpies Pyle serves as a
volunteer hygienist at The Family
Health Center, a new concept in
medical care in the "inner city."
Carol lives at 47 Sidney Place,
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201.



28




Thelma Greenberg Florin is em-
ployed part-time by the West Orange,
(New Jersey) Board of Education.
Thelma and husband enjoyed a
February vacation in Puerto Rico.

Marilyn Dawson Tufano is a li-
censed Real Estate saleswoman in
Quogue, Long Island.

Nancy Husted Koerner is a volun-
teer worker with the Association for
Retarded Children in the Carlisle-
Concord area.

June Weidner Burns is looking for-
ward to the summer at her vacation
home in Wolfboro, New Hampshire.

Marion Crossman MacCallum has
just completed work on the family
geneology. Marion is a member of
the D.A.R., Beethoven Home and
Association, West Roxbury Civic As-
sociation, and serves as an associate
editor of the monthly Bulletin for the
Boston League of Women Voters.

Janet Egan Anderholm is a teach-
er's assistant at the Glastonbury
Academy Junior High School.

Dorothy Fletcher French is asso-
ciated with the family-owned Radio
Shop in Concord, New Hampshire.
Dorothy Schanberg Goldman is a
saleswoman at Anita's Leather and
Crafts in Phoenix, Arizona.

Lorraine Nelson Stevens writes:
"Both my husband and ! have be-
come quite active in the Arlington
Friends of the Drama. I do the sets
which is quite a bit of fun. We are
now producing our first play. Time
consuming and hectic but reward-
ing."

Harriet Solotist Grunberg devotes
her time to volunteer work at the



Cranston (Rhode Island) hospital.
She is co-chairman of the local can-
cer crusade.

Suzanne Collins Cleveland is as-
sociated with a Real Estate office
in Andover, (Mass.); is an active
member of the local garden club;
exhibits in area flower shows.

Alison McFarlin Convery is man-
ager and co-owner of the Orient
Trader, The Edgartown gift shop.
Alison has recently completed the
text and illustrations for "A Child's
Guide to Martha's Vineyard."

Ruth Murdick Ryba has a new ad-
dress: R.D., Julian, Pa. 16844. Ruth
is a campus guide at The Pennsyl-
vania State University. She writes
further: "Earle and I have a hobby
that has turned into a business. We
handle our dogs in field trials and
have built kennels on our 460 acres
for our dogs and for boarding others.
It's a great business and kennels
are in demand. We are also helping
to get an AKC-recognized kennel
club organized in this area. We've
really gone to the dogs!"

Eleanor Sclare Mazur hopes "that
when my daughters are old enough
for college they will consider Lasell."
Eleanor's three daughters are Jill, 10;
Tracey, 8, and Heidi, 7.



'56

Ann Louise Tucker Schaefer is a
teacher in the So. Windsor, Conn.

Frances Scott Simmons is "active
in a local (Fairfield, Conn.) conserva-
tion group. We work with school
children; try to teach them the value
of preserving our woodland areas."

Ann Marcus Karol is a free-lance
fashion coordinator and commenta-
tor in New Haven, Conn.

Terry Kilgore Mannix has a new
address — effective February 1970 —
17 Lotus Avenue, Scituate, Mass.

Barbara O'Keefe Fornes writes
"Mike is a Navy medical officer —
vacations are often spent in moving.
We have lived in many parts of the
U.S.A. — including Cape Kennedy and
the U.S. Naval Academy." Barbara's
present address is 3 Maxim Lane,
Rockville, Maryland.

From Leanne Kessler Skolnick
"Somerset (Mass.) is a small, bed-
room community lying adjacent to
Fall River, and as such until five
years ago had no Jewish organiza-



tions. It was a joy, therefore, to be
instrumental in founding the first
Jewish organization in town, Hadas-
sah, and serving as its first President.
The following year, I arranged to or-
ganize the first Jewish Youth Or-
ganization in town."

Carole Slamin Ramey, husband
and young daughter, Susan, now live
in San Antonio, Texas — 117 Kinross.

Diane Halliday White writes from
Belmar (N.J.): "We live on a 26-acre
old farm; have a pony, a horse, a
dog, two cats and two kittens. AH
this seems to keep me quite busy."
Diane's daughter, Carolyn is now
12; William, Jr., 8.

Joan Hoffman Wark is enrolled in
a course on Real Estate Law at
Russell Sage Evening Division in Al-
bany.

Sally Anne Parker Hansell is a
member of the Germantown Women's
Club and the Historical Society. She
is also a member of the local Gilbert
and Sullivan Players.

Ann Pasquale Bassett is active in
the Garden Club and Women's Club
of Milton, Mass. Daughters, Lisa and
Andrea, are 9 and 8; George is 3.

Gail Gourdeau Krolicki now lives
at 6916 Foxcroft Drive, St. Louis,
Missouri. Gail raises and breeds
Siamese cats — lilac and sealpoint.

Dorothy Fayan Hammond is a psy-
chiatric group worker at Bradley Hos-
pital, Riverside, R.I. Jean Moseley
Frank is a secretary at the George
Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum,
Springfield, Mass.



Dear '56-er:

What has happened to news from
the class of 1956? It seems as though
The Leaves has not heard from you
in some time — surely there must be a
few interesting members of the class
of 1956. We would sincerely be in-
terested in hearing about you and
what you have been doing during the
past 14 1 /2 years — YES, it has been
almost 15 years since graduation!

We hope to be able to plan a
superb 15th reunion in June 1971 —
NEW AND DIFFERENT ideas are in
the making! Please watch for further
announcements in the Leaves for
our 15th— AND, LET'S HEAR FROM
YOU SOON!



Sandy Shelton Fitch '56



29



'58

Jo-Ann Harris Lautman x-'58 is
anxious to hear from Hawthorne
House classmates, viz Mary Louise
Moran, Carol Camillo, Judy Butler.
Jo-Ann's current address is: 485
Loring Avenue, W. Los Angeles,
Calif.

Gail Seibert Glover and husband
are now on a six-month assignment
in Tokyo, Japan.

Audrey Jucknavorian Silver is an
Executive Secretary with Agway Inc.
of Syracuse (N.Y.). She and her hus-
band are season patrons of the Syra-
cuse Symphony and Repertory
Theatre.

Elaine Shanken Fischer received
Honorable Mention in a National con-
test for outstanding workers in civic
affairs, for vision-screening nursery-
aged children through the Connecti-
cut Society for the Prevention of
Blindness.

From Sheila Donahue Hutter "Have
not yet written the GREAT AMERI-
CAN NOVEL and have no intention
of doing so. I prefer the following
activities: golf, tennis, curling, ski-
ing, snowmobiling, swimming, fish-
ing and partridge hunting."

Betty Arnall Thompson is a mem-
ber of the International Sorority,
Beta Sigma Phi. She has served as
chapter President; last year was
elected second Vice President of the
St. Petersburg city council.

Diane Collins Whitfield forwards a
new address: 413 High Street, Hamp-
ton, N.H.

For the past seven years, Gwen
Buell Bevier has been a ski instruc-
tor at Round Top Mountain and
Schenectady Ski School.

Barbara Karcher Krietemeyer x-'58
writes: "We are a military family sub-
ject to frequent transfer. Our present
address is 11011 Santa Clara Drive,
Fairfax, Virginia."

Barbara Stannard Eddy "and hus-
band spend weekends at our chalet
at the Killington, Vermont ski area;
when the snow goes, we take to the
lakes and rivers by canoe."

Maria Arpante Meyer, "an ex-
school teacher as of September 1969
is presently helping her husband in
the Real Estate business. Our hobby
is a small antique business called
the Cambridge Antiquarian. At pres-
ent we do shows and mail order —
eventually hope for our own show."




Mary Gail Fenn, a kindergarten
teacher in Bedford, is a member of
the Louisa May Alcott Memorial As-
sociation and Antiquarian Society
Museum. She has exhibited — in Con-
cord and Maiden, (Mass.) — grave
stone rubbings; is currently working
on a map of the Concord woods now
owned by Harvard University.

Mary Elizabeth Murray Cass is
now living in Atlanta, Ga. — 3904
Gladney Drive. She is still interested
in ceramics and crewel work; has
added Towle painting to her list of
hobbies.

Jane Brodkey-Wohlner had an ex-
hibition of paintings at the Kansas
City Plaza Art Fair.

Patricia Graff Willoughby is applied
mathematics assistant at the Decatur
(Ala.) Division of Monsanto Textiles.



'60

Weddings:

Mary Jane Hazrick and Robert
B. Van Wieren on June 6, 1970
in Niantic, Conn.

Born: To Marilyn Senior Legg, sec-
ond son, Scott Richard, on
April 4, 1970.

To Ronna Zucker Uhrman, a
third child, second daughter,
Mindi Cara, on March 11, 1970.
School teaching is the career of
these 1960 graduates: Diane Frankel
Shulkin, nursery school teacher at
the Stamford Jewish Center in Stam-
ford, Conn.; Faith Bowker is a
teacher at the Montgomery Co.
Board of Education elementary
school in Chevy Chase, Maryland;
Julia Ellingham Svatora is a teacher



at St. Damian School in Westland,
Michigan; Barbara Jacoby is a sec-
ond grade teacher at Middle Country
Dist. #11 in Centereach, N.Y.

Judy Blake Mitchell, a former ad-
ministrative officer of the Historical
Evaluation and Research Organiza-
tion, has transferred her office to
her home in College Park, Maryland.
She edits historical and legal com-
munications, military books and re-
search documents.

Sandra Hunt is a personnel assist-
ant with William Hengerer Company
in Buffalo, N.Y.

Barbara Greiff Mines has returned
to West Hartford, Conn., where she
is an active Board member of the
Hadassah and American Jewish Con-
gress.

Ann Salk Michaelson writes: "My
life is devoted to my husband and
two children. We are a happy family
and I find my life very gratifying."
Ann's children are Peter Marc, born
July 29, 1966; Amy Susan, born Oc-
tober 31, 1969.

Linda Eisenberg Oliwenstein is a
member of the Kew Gardens (L.I.)
Chapter of CARITH (Children's
Asthma Research Institute and Hos-
pital).

Frances Cotton's "free time" is
spent in Art or art craft type projects.
"An exhibition of her work was on
display at the Boston Art Guild in
May 1969."

In January, Henita Simons Myers
moved to Holly Point Road, Center-
ville, Mass. She writes: "I have been
so active since moving to the Cape.
Shall list a few of the things I have
done — Corresponding and Recording
secretary of the Hyannis Women's
Club, Chairman of the December
Charity Ball, President of the Center-
ville Kindergarten Association, mem-
ber of the Cape Cod Board of Edu-
cation and a member of the Hyannis
Historical Society."

One of the Michele Poirier Gor-
man's hobbies is designing chil-
dren's furniture as well as children's
clothes. Her favorite "two" are:
Anique C. Gorman, born June 14,
1967, and Gareth F. Gorman, born
February 28, 1969.

Audrey Bergesen Long is presently
Vice Chairman of the New Jersey
Residence Lighting Forum. The func-
tion of this group is to promote bet-
ter lighting and better sight, both
indoors and outdoors.



30



Aline Carleton Beck is a medical
technologist at Boston's Robert
Brigham Hospital. Nancy Maas Bet-
tinardi is a secretary for Times Mir-
ror Company in New York City.

Valerie Rothman Cenit plans to
return to New Orleans for the Mardi
Gras celebration. Valerie lived in
Louisiana for a year; has now re-
turned to 394 Lewelen Circle, Engle-
wood, New Jersey 07631.

Elizabeth Backus Girard sends her
current address: 214 E. Surrey Ave.,
Northfield, New Jersey, 08225. She
adds: "At this time, I am a member
of the League of Women Voters. Am
the Chairman of Voter Service which
is educating the public to registra-
tion and election procedures and to
the qualifications of candidates on
a county level through debates and
newspapers."

Antoinette Malefakis Mellen writes:
"Upon graduation from Lasell worked
as a 'Fashion artist' for four years.
Then free-lanced art work occasion-
ally. Belong to Canton (Mass.) Art
Association and exhibit paintings
and portraits twice a year."

'62

Born: To Sally Remley Southmayd,
second child, first son, David
Webster, on April 30, 1970.

After a series of "changes of ad-
dress," Susan Brooks Weiner is now
"at home" at 519 W. Davis Blvd.,
Tampa, Fla. 33606. Her husband, an
Orthopedic surgeon, is a staff mem-
ber of the Tampa General Hospital.

Barbara Fitzgerald Edson now
lives in Hanover, New Hampshire at
9S Balch Street.

1962 secretaries include: Ellen
Signorelli Johnson, secretary to the
Assistant Treasurer of General Foods
Corporation, White Plains, N. Y.;
Christine Shier Shaw, assistant to
the President of the Alaska Bancor-
poration, N. Y.; Sandra Whigham
Marlowe, College of Medicine, Uni-
versity of Vermont, Burlington;
Roberta McKinley Machalek, Depart-
ment of Psychology, University of
Texas, Austin; Marcia Olliver Soutar,
Department of Health, Barre, Ver-
mont.

Harriet Rosenzweid Zand is a
psychiatric social worker with the
Brookline Health Clinic. She is con-
tinuing her studies for a M.S.W. at
Simmons College.



Pamela Washburn Coffey writes:
"have served as organist and choir
director at one of our Brewer (Maine)
churches, and have been involved in
a local theatre production. This year
I am a Board member of the Cerebral
Palsy school in Bangor, and co-
chairman of the Bangor Community
Concert Drive.

In the teaching profession are:
Joan Wilson Killilea, Lincoln, Mass.;
Rita Hutchinson Okerhohn, Arlington,
Mass.; Priscilla Lane Jarman, Green-
ville, North Carolina.

Nance Danow Morin sends a
change of address: 4 Robin St.,
Pawcatuck, Conn.

Linda DiFazio Lech "has instituted
a tutorial program for culturally dis-
advantaged in New Britain, Conn."

Patricia Naples Howes is a new
member of the American Association
of University Women; is an alumnae
advisor of Kappa Kappa Gamma.

Jasmin Mueller Gentling has re-
cently moved to 536 J. Ave., Coro-
nado, Calif. 92118.

Lucy Brunton Buckley was award-
ed the degree of Bachelor of Arts at
the Fall Commencement of Suffolk
University in September 1969.

Penny Hills was graduated from
Boston University's Sargent College
in 1969. She is a registered occupa-
tional therapist; is currently working
at the Rehabilitation Center at Holy
Ghost Hospital, Cambridge.

Muriel Bloom Bruskin writes from
412 Chestnut Avenue, Mamaroneck,
N. Y.: "My husband has been elected
president of Suburban Dental Society
and is attending dentist at Grass-
lands Hospital, Valhalla. He practices
dentistry in Mamaroneck. Daughter
Jay Michelle is now two years old.
Twin sister Miriam (Bloom Chaiklin)
has two girls — Jill, 3 1 /2, and Amy,
V/z."

'64

Engagements:

Cherry M. Campbell to Charles

H. Cremens

Marcia N. Margolis to Jeffrey

B. Wolf
Weddings:

Nancy Edmonstone Wilson and

Jeffrey B. Carter on May 29,

1970 in Old Lyme, Conn.

Anne M. Kersten and John H.

Chamberlain on March 14,

1970 in New York City.



Born: To Carol Bradley Sullivan, a
son, Bradley Downs, on Feb-
ruary 22, 1970.

To Eugenia Giammarco Ander-
son, a son, Scott, on February
5, 1970.

To Linda Shafer Polevoy, a
son, Seth Douglas, on June 15,
1970.
Penny Brewster Martyn writes:
"Right now I am very busy raising
two children — Michelle, 2, and War-
ren, 1. I hope to get back into the
retailing field when they are a little
older."

Susan Coster Malsin has recently
moved to 29 Falcon Court, Mech-
anicsburg, Pa. 17055.

Patricia Pugliese Streibel has been
active in the Women's Auxiliary to
Junior Chamber of Commerce in
Rochester, N. Y. She spends con-
siderable time caring for two-year-
old Stephen, and sewing, redecorat-
ing and improving homemaking
skills."

Claire Molloy Witherell writes:
"since retiring from teaching kinder-
garten I have been redecorating our
new house and raising our daughter
Katherine — and now a German Shep-
ard puppy — I have a full time job!"
Nina Dotterer Johnston is senior
secretary to the Assistant Chief of
Medicine at the Massachusetts
General Hospital. Nina's local ad-
dress is: 100 Memorial Drive — 11-7C,
Cambridge, Mass. 02142.

Dianne Davenport Vincent is at-
tending graduate school at Bridge-
water State in Bridgewater, Mass.

Marion Bishop Kersh, a charter
member of the Norfolk (Va.) Zonta
Club is serving her third term as




31




recording-corresponding secretary
for the group. Marion adds: "at
present I am in the process of writing
an historical novel hopefully to be
published by 1971."

Paula Johnson Hilton has moved
to a new home at 258 Edgewood
Circle, Southington, Conn. 06489.

Carolyn Fogg Yaekel is interested
in contacting alumnae in Rochester,
N. Y. Carolyn's address there is 28
Bobrick Drive, Rochester, N. Y.
14610.

Marilyn Schwarz Wheeler tells us
of the arrival of her daughter: Jill
Karen, born July 22, 1969.

Beverly Townsend Branzell is a
part-time worker at the Zayre Corpo-
ration in Framingham, Mass. Dorothy
Minzner is an administrative staff
instructor at the Boston office of the
New England Telephone Company.

Jane Pearson Kurz, a tutor in the
Honolulu elementary school system,
is an active volunteer for the zoo
and museum. Jane's address in
Hawaii is: 420 Second Street, Hono-
lulu, Hawaii 96818.



'66

Engagements:

Judith A. Clark to S. Sgt.
Robert W. Lecklider, U.S.A.F.
Carolyn J. Davis to William
Fish, II



Carol Grossman to Mark Spec-
tor

Linda L. Smith to Joel H. Cohen
Sandra Oakes to Girard
Hammond, III

Weddings:

Arlyn G. Baker and Philip K.
Sadowski in May 1970 in Med-
ford, Mass.

Born: To Joy Abercrombie Dooley, a
daughter, Ellen Grace, on Oc-
tober 18, 1969.

Among the graduates at the Com-
mencement Exercises of Stetson Uni-
versity, DeLand, Florida, in June 1969
was Gail MacLean Cabral. While at
Stetson, she was a member of Pi Beta
Phi sorority, Panhellenic Council and
homecoming committees. She was
on the Dean's List for this past
semester and honor roll for her last
one and one half years.

Anna Tambureno received her
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from
Boston University's School of Fine
and Applied Arts, where she majored
in Advertising Design. While at B.U.
Anna was a Dean's Host for the art
division and was also given a
scholarship award as a divisional
assistant in lettering.



'68

Engagements:

Marlene Ewart to Peter R.

Bacot

Lynne Houser to Gary R. Rush

Elaine Laridis to James P.

Reardon

Elizabeth C. Lord to Craig F.

Lichman

Roberta M. Munce to William

G. Hayward, Jr.

Susan Penney to Joseph E.

Rizzo

Joyce Robinson to Richard

Collette

Hope W. Rose to Frederick C.

Angier

Ann P. Sager to Ronald M.

MacFarlane

Nanci Shorter to Ronald L.

Kocher

Weddings:

Eve D. Bernard and Clifford M.
Ojala in May 1970 in Newton-
ville, Mass.
Melissa Derby and Richard P.



Oettinger on February 21, 1970
in Plantsville, Conn.
Diane Dickinson and Miles
Page on February 14, 1970 in
Wellesley, Mass.
Susan Lahive and Edward J.
Columbus on March 14, 1970
in Quincy, Mass.
Edith B. Mossberg and Mark
H. Medoff on May 24, 1970 in
Mamaroneck, N.Y.
Joyce V. Robinson and Richard
A. Collette in May 1970 in
Woburn, Mass.

Nancy B. Roper and Pvt. Ron-
ald M. Christoforo, USA on
February 14, 1970 in Hamden,
Conn.

Patricia Seidman and David
Horowitz on March 29, 1970 in
Inwood, Long Island, N. Y.-
Patricia A. Torbron and Ter-
rence Geoghegan on March 21,
1970 in Canfield, Ohio

Judith Ann Giftos has recently
graduated from the University of
Massachusetts with a bachelor of
arts degree in elementary education;
she is now doing graduate work in
urban education at UMass. Judy is
the daughter of Despina Spring
Giftos '41; her sister, Lynda, will
enter Lasell in September '70.

In July, Candace Watson was
graduated from the Northeast Air-
lines Stewardess Training Center.

Laura Howe is a resident student
in the Special Course for College
Women at the Katharine Gibbs
School.



70

Engagements:

Sara Worthen to John G.
Sundborg, Jr.




32



In Memoriam



C. Mildred Peirce Wise '06 on April 27, 1970.

Emmeline Guernsey x-'08 on June 19, 1969 in
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

Florence Stark Burnham x-'08 on May 4, 1970 in
Naples, Fla.

Sara Foster Farnsworth '26 on March 22, 1970 in
Pompano Beach, Fla.

Kathleen Robertson Grusby '58 on May 26, 1970 in
San Diego, Calif.

Marian Dreifuss Goldschmidt x-'59 on May 6, 1970 in
New Haven, Conn.

Mrs. Anna Eichhorn Cushman (Faculty 1921-49) on
May 31, 1970 in Cambridge, Mass.



Point . . .



In the continuing debate about the role
of Junior Colleges in the changing pattern of
education, Dr. Gustave O. Arlt, President
of the Council of Graduate Schools in
the U.S., had this to say recently:

"The Junior College movement and its
unbounded growth clearly indicates the
insistent need for post-high school educa-
tion. I forsee that the Junior College will
eventually become a part of basic
secondary education and that the great
majority of youth — in some states, all — will
be in school until age 20. This development
itself will fundamentally change every-
thing that follows. . . .

"The bachelor's degree will, after a long
and bitter rear-guard action, disappear.
Indeed, if we are perfectly honest and
realistic, we must admit that it is already an
anachronism. A hundred years ago, it
was a social status symbol. Fifty years
ago, it was a union card for membership in
many vocations. Today it is the admissions
ticket to graduate school, and only a partial
admissions ticket at that. Now if the grad-
uate school becomes an integral part of an
endless continuum of advanced education,
what purposes will the baccalaureate
serve?"



LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE

Alumnae Office
Auburndale, Massachusetts 02166

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED



THIRD CLASS MAIL



Non-Profit Org.



U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Auburndale, Mass.
Permit No. 10471









Mrs. Cvara

7 Parkview Or.

Lliburn, H. J.



kj vv .



i -






07041



L
A
S

E
L



EAVES



Fall 1970




Lasell Alumnae, Inc.



Officers 1970-71

President

Sandy Shelton Fitch '56 (Mrs. Norman P.)

9 Fox Lane, Medfield 02052

First Vice-President

Penny Rafkin Hurwitz '56 (Mrs. Budd H.)
4 Rolling Drive, Framingham 01701

Second Vice-President

Kay Woolaver Parsons '46 (Mrs. George E.)
32 Marcia Road, Watertown 02171

Recording Secretary

Betty Williams McGowan '47 (Mrs. F. M., Jr.)
52 Brewster Avenue, Braintree Highlands 02185

Corresponding Secretary

Lee Pool Langley '46 (Mrs. P. B.)
355 Highland Street, Weston 02193

Treasurer

Ruth Turner Crosby '42 (Mrs. R. A.)
170 Harvard Street, Newtonville 02160

Assistant Treasurer

Ruth Buswell Isaacson '36 (Mrs. C. G. G.)

10 Laurel Avenue, Waltham 02154

Alumnae Fund Committee

Alice Pratt Brown '29 (Mrs. William W.)
Crest Road, Middlebury, Conn. 06762

Mildred Bell Cole '31 (Mrs. Oliver S.)
95 Fox Hill Street, Westwood 02090



Directors

Mildred Strain Nutter '17 (Mrs. Denton G.)
1094 Centre Street, Newton Centre 02159

Toni Meritt Smith '23 (Mrs. W. N.)

110 Woodland Road, Auburndale 02166

Dorothy Inett Taylor '30 (Mrs. L. D.)
41 Brentwood Drive, Holden 01520

Shirley Gould Chesebro '33 (Mrs. R. Alan)
110 Carver Road, Newton Highlands 02161

Faye Wadhams Smith '38 (Mrs. Edward L.)
Duncaster Lane, Bloomfield, Conn. 06002

Camie Porter Morison '40 (Mrs. Wm. K.)
8 Park Ridge, Concord, N.H. 03301

Marilyn Blodgett Hall '46 (Mrs. E. Sherman, Jr.)
60 Ledgelawn Avenue, Lexington 02173

Mary Small Lee '48 (Mrs. Walter C.)
192 Pine Ridge Road, Waban 02168

Judy Parker Haas '49 (Mrs. R. H.)

3 Sherwood Road, Nashua, N.H. 03060

Linda Nolin Ahern '55 (Mrs. Robert)
106 Hemlock Street, Arlington 02174

Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 (Mrs. Bruce B.)
Box 181, Dover 02030

Nancye Van Deusen Connor '57 (Mrs. Philip J.)
28 Pilgrim Road, Wellesley 02181

Susan Shaw Abbott '61 (Mrs. William S.)
50 Melvin Road, Arlington 02174

Nan Sparks Hunter '61 (Mrs. Carl E.)
69 Main St., Framingham Centre 01701



Louise Tardivel Higgins '37 (Mrs. C. A., Jr.)
150 Hickory Road, Weston 02193

Scholarship Committee Chairman

Virginia Wolfe Perkins '44 (Mrs. E. F., Jr.)
76 Orchard Lane, Melrose 02176



Alumnae Secretary

Marjorie MacClymon '32

Lasell Junior College, Auburndale 02166

Lasell Leaves

Editor

Patricia Searles

Alumnae Editor

Marjorie MacClymon '32



The Lasell Leaves is published quarterly by Lasell Alumnae, Inc., Lasell Junior College, Auburndale, Mass. 02166,
a member of the American Alumni Council since 1947. The views expressed herein are those of the editor and do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of the administration or Lasell Alumnae, Inc. Single copies of Lasell Leaves may
be obtained for $1.25 from the Alumnae Office.



Vol. XCVI No. 1
November 1970



CREDITS:

Cover: Music for the Academic Fanfare
and Procession in G, composed and
dedicated to Dr. Greene for Inaugural Con-
vocation by George Lane, College Marshal
and Associate Professor of English.

Photos: Chalue: 4, 5, 22

Fay Foto: 10
Printing: Crimson Printing Co.



CONTENTS



A Letter From the President 2



Inaugural Convocation 4



Address, President Kenneth M. Greene 8



Inaugural Reception 10

Alumnae Fund Report 11

Alumnae Daughters Arrive 22

Class Notes 23



In Memoriam 32



A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT TO THE ALUMNAE



I am glad of the opportunity to speak
to the alumnae through this letter and
I hope that it will be the beginning of
a continuing communication between
us. First of all, I want to acknowledge
the cordiality of the reception I have
had since coming to Lasell on July 1.
Everyone has been most gracious
and enthusiastic; and though I am sure
that many people realize that the job
I have undertaken is not going to
endear me to everyone, they know the
job has to be done and they are
offering their support.

Even before taking office I had a
chance to meet alumnae groups last
spring, and from the beginning I was
impressed by their frank fondness
for the College and by their intense
loyalty to it. As I settled down to work
in July and began to absorb the
atmosphere of the campus — the
combination of dignity and vitality, of
mellow age and new energy, I began to
acquire a clearer understanding of
what inspired the alumnae loyalty.
Lasell is an institution of distinctive
character. An aura of quality embraces
it, and that quality deserves not only
to be preserved but to be developed.

My job, of course, is to see to the
preservation and development of the
College; and to that end I devoted my
first days to learning all I could about
the policies, practices, traditions,
plans, and problems that are identified
with the institution. As I had said to
various segments of the College
community back in the spring, it was
not my intention to turn the place
upside down immediately. I wanted to
look around carefully, to listen
attentively and to reflect on needed
changes. And this is what I have been
doing as far as possible. But I
discovered very early in my term of
office that there were some things that
could not wait to be done. For
example, I was much concerned about
the position the College would take
regarding requests from some quarters
for a change in the College calendar
that would allow two weeks off at the
end of October to permit students to
work in political campaigns. There



had been some talk about this matter
in the spring. An inconclusive student
poll had been taken; department
chairmen had reached some general
agreements; but no clear position had
been taken that reflected the will of
the College community. In my view it
seemed unwise to wait until college
reconvened in late September and
then to patch together a plan or policy
that would almost necessarily reflect
the haste in which it was conceived.

Therefore, I formulated a position
that seemed reasonable to me in the
light of what I knew of Lasell, of
students generally, of faculties, of
federal tax laws, of local assessors'
policies, and of my own philosophical
convictions about the educational
process. The details of the plan I will
not go into here because they appear
in the most recent issue of News
from Lasell. Suffice it to say that the
plan calls for no interruption of the
regular college calendar, but it does
offer a facility to students and faculty
who wish to participate in the election
process. It was conceived to encourage
free and healthy participation in a
vital aspect of our lives — but not at
the expense of the equally vital aspect
of formal education.

What I have been talking about is a
matter of short-range planning for a
very specific purpose. We will always
have to be prepared to do that kind
of planning. But it is even more
important to develop a comprehensive
scheme of action for the College — a
chart of its course for the next five
or ten years. And so I was delighted to
find that the Chairman of the Long-
Range Planning Committee of the
Board of Trustees, Mr. Alfred Edwards,
was eager to get going on the
formulation of a plan. Consequently,
the committee was convened in
August for an all-day meeting; and
at that meeting some very significant
agreements were reached — principally
that the College should undertake a
systems approach to its long-range
planning. The initial stage of that
approach, a statistical profile of the
College as it is now, is almost



completed at this date and will, in 1
be ready for presentation to the
Committee at its next meeting on
October 27. It is perhaps worth adc
as a footnote that the recently
announced theme of the annual
meeting of the Association of Inde-
pendent Junior Colleges is "Plan o
Perish."

Both the Long-Range Planning
Committee, and the Building Com-
mittee, which also met this summe
addressed themselves to the quest
of constructing new dormitory
facilities. In my inaugural remarks,
have referred to our decision to tur
down a federal loan that would hav
covered a large part of the cost of
building a new dormitory. I mentior
this painful decision again here sin
to underscore the necessity for the
College to improve its financial pos
to the point where it can afford, in
a similar situation, to assume the c
of debt service and the cost, over
and above the amount of the loan, '
complete a dormitory, and still to
meet its other obligations and serv
other priorities.

The financial squeeze that is hurtir
colleges all over the country is not
sparing Lasell. The cost of operatir
college increases at an alarmingly
greater rate than the income increc
When an institution depends almos
exclusively on tuition for its operat
revenue, it has a very severe probhi
indeed. There is a limit beyond whi
tuition and other charges simply
cannot be raised if the college is g<
to continue to fill its enrollment
capacity. But rising operating costs
not respect that limit. And so, of all
the problems that currently confror
American colleges — and Lasell am
them — the economic problem is th<
most forbidding.

Naturally we are exploring every
possibility of reducing operating
costs. I have made it clear to the
faculty as a whole and to the chairri
of departments in particular that we
must examine our course offerings
a view to eliminating those that are



no longer serving significant educa-
tional objectives and that are no longer
attracting students in sufficient
numbers. But even if we reduce the
size of our faculty somewhat, even if
we make more efficient use of the
resources we now have, we cannot
delude ourselves into believing that we
can survive the economic crisis
unless we can bring substantially more
income into the College.

And this is where we need help from
the alumnae. Your help is needed,
I think it is fair to say, as it has never
been needed before.

Lasell has never had a major capital
fund drive — a drive aimed at achieving
a seven-figure goal. One of my chief
responsibilities is to prepare the way
for such a campaign, and to that
end I have been meeting with groups
and with individuals who might be
persuaded to help the College. But the
principal source of support will
necessarily be the alumnae, and I
am quite frankly worried by the
present relationship between the
alumnae and the College. There is on
the one hand the virtually autonomous
position of the Lasell Alumnae, In-
corporated, and on the other hand
the College's tendency not to
involve the alumnae sufficiently in
institutional plans. Clearly we must get
together. No capital fund drive will
succeed unless the alumnae are
brought in under the College umbrella
and we all work together for the same
purpose. The Board of Management
of Lasell Alumnae, Inc. was kind
enough to invite me to speak at their
recent meeting, and I expressed
candidly to them my hope that they
would very soon reach their goal in the
fund drive for a swimming pool so that
the College could project realistic
plans for a capital campaign.

Meanwhile, I might conclude by
giving you a brief summary of the
issues and activities currently under
consideration at the College. Because
I believe that we need a broadly
representative body to formulate insti-
tutional policy, I have charged Dean
June Babcock and Miss Elizabeth



Anthony to draw up recommendations
for the composition of a College
Senate. Because I want an efficient
means of contact with all the College
constituencies even before the Senate
is established, I am forming a
President's Advisory Council consist-
ing of representation from the alumnae
as well as from the faculty, student
body, and administrative staff.

Because I am uneasy about the
absence of a clear and comprehensive
statement of student rights and re-
sponsibilities at Lasell, I have charged
the Judicial Committee, under the
chairmanship of Dean Nancy Seiple,
with the job of drawing up such a
statement and presenting it to the
College community for adoption. In the
interim, I have made it clear in my
announcements to the faculty and to
the student representatives in the
faculty meeting that the College will
act in accordance with the recom-
mendations of the American Bar
Association to the Association of
Student Government last year —
recommendations that were intended
to serve colleges that had as yet
drawn up no rules of their own.

Among other things, the Bar
Association recommendations stipulate
that students should have the right of
peaceful protest and demonstration
but that any disruptive or destructive
conduct is subject to disciplinary
action up to and including expulsion.
Disruptive action includes the
obstruction of any of the normal
teaching or administrative proceedings
of the college. At the same time the
recommendations protect the rights of
the students very explicitly. Their
right of personal freedom is protected
and they are assured that if they
should be charged with any kind of
misconduct they will be fully pro-
tected by rules of academic due
process. It is my hope that regulations
will be cheerfully obeyed and that
disciplinary procedures will not be
necessary; but recent history suggests
that a college should be prepared in
advance for dealing with crises,
large or small, and that to be un-
prepared is to invite chaos and panic



at the worst and a feeling of
insecurity at best.

Still along the lines of establishing
procedures and policies that will
enable us to live together as
harmoniously as possible, I am going
to recommend to the Board of Trustees
that we set up a commission of
students, faculty, alumnae, trustees,
and parents to explore the concept of
in loco parentis as it relates to Lasell.
The purpose of such a commission will
be to come up with a philosophical
position upon which our social rules
can be based, so that instead of
changing rules piecemeal and in
response to pressure of the moment,
we can make changes that reflect
a common understanding of the
College's responsibilities to the
students and to their parents. This
notion may be too Utopian, and we
may, in fact, want to change some
rules slightly even before the
commission meets; but the idea is, I
think, basically a sound one and I
would like to try it out.

Finally, I am hopeful that the faculty's
anxiety about the issues that affected
the strike of last spring will be
relieved in large measure by the work
of the Ad Hoc Committee on
Evaluation. That committee has been
meeting regularly through the summer
and has produced a very full report
and specific recommendations for
procedures to be followed in the
evaluation of faculty members for
promotion, retention, or dismissal. This
report is now being discussed by the
several constituencies of the College
and, I assume, will be adopted either
in its present form or in a slightly
modified form before long.

I think it is vitally important that we do
everything possible to generate a
hopeful and positive attitude on the
campus. If you think there is anything I
can do that I am not now doing
to help create this kind of attitude, I
will be glad to hear from you. Mean-
while, I look forward to meeting many
of you personally as I visit regional
Alumnae Clubs through the year.

— Kenneth M. Greene



INAUGURAL



CONVOCATION




On Tuesday, September 22, 1970, Dr. Kenneth M. Greene became
Lasell's fifth president in a special inaugural convocation in Winslow
Hall. Representatives of the trustees, alumnae, faculty, and students
offered their greetings, which are reprinted here. Executive
Director of the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary
Schools, Frank A. Tredinnick, Jr., and The Honorable Monte G.
Basbas, Mayor of Newton also welcomed Dr. Greene to the professional
and neighboring communities. Then, on behalf of the trustees, Mrs.
Rosen installed Dr. Greene in a brief induction ceremony and he
addressed the Lasell community for the first time as its president. The
text of his address also follows on page 8. Entering Winslow in the
processional were: (above, left): Dr. Greene and Mrs. Rosen; and
(above, right): Dr. Packard and Sandra Boys, walking behind trustees
Richard Winslow and Joseph C. Skinner.



From the Trustees, Mrs. David
Rosen; Chairman of the Board of
Trustees:

On behalf of the Board of Trustees
and the Inaugural Committee, I
should first like to extend warmest
greetings of the College to all of you
who are participating with us in this
Inaugural Convocation. Today we
formally begin a new academic year,
and a new chapter in the history of
Lasell with the induction of Dr. Greene
into the presidency, and we are
gratified by the interest and enthusiasn
of all who have worked with Dean
Babcock to make this occasion
possible.

As the oldest two-year college
for women in the United States, Lasell
has always been acutely conscious
of her role as a pioneeer in a wide
variety of pre-professional and liberal
arts fields. We are proud of the way ir
which Lasell has responded to the
educational challenges of succesive
generations in the twelve decades of
her existence. As all of us know, the
need for change is not always visible
to everyone, and the processes of
change and adjustment to the needs
of a rapidly evolving society may at
times seem traumatic, even painful.
Pride in the traditions of our institutions
is a source of reassurance and a
moral bulwark against the feelings of
alienation and aimlessness that per-
vade much of this troubled world.



May I suggest to you, and
especially to the young and impatient
among you, that tradition is not
necessarily an evil word, that change,
only for the sake of change is no
virtue; and that much of our success
in the future depends on how well we
utilize the experience of the past;
on how much we learn from our mis-
takes, and on how firmly we can
build on what has been of value to us
before.

Yet we know that pride alone,
pride in our traditions alone, is not
enough. We must be sure that our
traditions work; that the values and
standards that have proven to be of
such worth to Lasell in the past, are
continuing to be effective today.
We believe we are fortunate in our
choice of a teacher and administrator
who can guide us in this continuing
process of self-evaluation and
adjustment to the challenges that will
face us in the 1970's. We believe in
the future of Lasell and we celebrate
this morning the arrival of a president
whose energy and integrity and
foresight have already given us reason
for renewed faith in that future.

And so, as we mark the beginning
of a new academic year, a new
decade, and a new administration with
the installation of President Greene,
we welcome all of you who are also
new members of the Lasell community,
students, faculty and staff. May your
years at Lasell be happy and reward-
ing ones, as you work with us to
maintain that unique position that
Lasell has so long occupied in the
education of young women.




From the Alumnae, Mrs. Norman P.
Fitch, President of Lasell Alumnae,
Inc.

On behalf of Lasell Alumnae, Inc.,
it gives me personal pleasure to
welcome you, Dr. Kenneth M. Greene,
as the fifth President of Lasell Junior
College. Our Lasell alumnae body
is comprised of over 10,000 girls
representing each state in the union
and many countries throughout the
world. Since our association was
formed in 1875 we have been primarily
interested in serving the needs of the
College among our alumnae, students,
faculty, and administration. Dr.
Greene, may we welcome you and
your family to the Lasell family, offer
you our co-operation, and wish you a
most successful administration.



From the Faculty, Dr. Richard M.
Packard, Chairman of the Depart-
ment of History and Political
Economy:

Dr. Greene, it seems to me and to
many of my colleagues that your
success as president of Lasell will
depend substantially upon the dedica-
cation of the faculty to the larger
interests of the college. All teachers
must be willing to serve on committees
and to work — to show the falsity of
the statement of one of our former
presidents that faculty members
forever complain but when given
responsibility do not come through.
We must attend faculty meetings and
stay to the bitter end. We must
appreciate, as McGeorge Bundy points
out, the great value of good admin-
istrators who make it possible for
teachers to spend most of their time in
teaching. Like the students, faculty
members must keep on hating
injustice and war, must place them-
selves against possible violence on
campus, must continue to push for
reform at Lasell through free speech,
reason and persuasion. In general,
they must work, as President Pusey
said, to get rid of encrusted sham
and revitalize the institution. We have
ample justification for pessimism about
the future of mankind and to be
against much in the Establishment.
But we and the students and you
together must decide what we are for.

President Greene, speaking from
some small personal experience, I
know that you have a more difficult
job than any of the teachers here, for
you will feel the pressure from five
groups of constituents — faculty,
students, administrators, trustees and
alumnae. To some degree, you will
have to satisfy them all. Partly as a
result of the events of last spring, you
may not have to deal with trustee
intervention in the day-by-day life of
the college, but you still must win
trustee support for your decisions on
how to spend tuition money and how to
raise new income. You probably have
already discovered that you must
face the delicate task of a revision of
our administration. As for the heart
and center of the college, the faculty
and students, you will have to listen
continuously and attentively to what
they have to say, considering seriously
the merits of the ideas presented and



trying to put those best founded into
effect. This means that you will have to
reconcile the younger and older
faculty members, the moderate and
activist students, and various factions
in the alumnae, while carrying out
reforms which may not wholly please
any of these groups.

Above all, Dr. Greene, we
teachers and all those connected with
Lasell look to you to enlarge the
hope that your presence here has en-
couraged in us. People the world over
are grasping at any basis for a
reasonable hope that man and nature
can heal their destructive tendencies.
In Maine this summer I took a little
comfort from the news that a few
salmon returned to the Penobscot
River and that a few fish hawks
hatched out living young. At Lasell we
need very much to foster the hope
that by co-operating with you we can
together make this college survive and
improve. We like what we have seen
of you already; we like your commit-
ment to educational excellence; we
want to meet you more than half-way.
So with apologies to St. Paul, we would
give you this charge: Watch ye, stand
fast in faith, quit you like a man, be
strong. Let all your things be done with
charity.



From the students, Sandra Boys,
President of the College
Government Association:

I am most honored to be meeting
here today to welcome Dr. Kenneth
Greene, our new-found president and
friend.

For the present senior class, the
lack of a full-time president has left
a great want in our campus life.
Dean Babcock assumed the role of
acting president and very success-
fully executed her duties in that
capacity. So you see we are not only
gaining a new president, but we also
have a very devoted dean.

Rightfully this day belongs to Dr.
Greene but it also belongs to Lasell
Junior College. We have entered into a
new realm of thought, ideas, and
goals. A time like this demands strong
minds, great hearts, true hope and
willing hands. We must now and
always, renew, rejuvenate ourselves
and realize the vitalizing, strenthening
influence of one another.

We all feel most fortunate to have
the traditional presidential house
become a home, and a group become
a family once more. While the main
burden and center of campus activity
must be with us, we shall need the aid,
the encouragement, the guidance,
that the strong can give the weak, the
mature can give the inexperienced.
Thus we will be helping one another.

And so, Dr. Greene, I say with
Wordsworth: "Naught shall prevail
against us, nor disturb our cheerful
faith that all that we behold is full of
blessing."



From the New England Associati
of Colleges and Secondary
Schools, Frank A. Tredinnick, Jr.
Executive Director:

It is my privilege to extend my
greetings to Lasell and Dr. Greene c
behalf of the more than 900 schools
colleges, and universities of the Ne\
England Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools, all 900 I mi
add, equally esteemed by Attorney
General and Mrs. Mitchell.

President Greene, on behalf of
the Association, in addition to what
has been wished today, may I expre
the hope, that I would express to all
educational leaders today. May you
institution be endowed with the
sometimes elusive virtues such as:
aspects of wisdom in the students,
vision in the Board of Trustees,
humility in the faculty and forebear
ance and understanding in the
alumnae body. And may you, sir, in
your high office find stimulus in
challenge, courage in adversity, rew
in the many accomplishments of yoi
students and your faculty, and abov
all, may you find time, at least oc-
casionally, for that kind of reflectior
and introspection that will refresh
and sustain you and your colleague

I salute you on this auspicious
day as a friend, and as a colleague,
and I congratulate Lasell on the
acumen of its selection committee a
on its general institutional good
fortune in enlisting the leadership o
Dr. Kenneth Greene.



From the City of Newton,

The Honorable Monte G. Basbas,

Mayor:

I have a prepared statement
which of course is the proper thing for
such an occasion, but it's a beautiful
day, more like commencement
weather than the first of October, I
will hand this to Dr. Greene, ask him
to read my comments at some
future date and just say that it's a
pleasure always to some here to
Lasell. We love you dearly. Those of us
in government look upon Lasell with
a great deal of pride. We look at you
young ladies and we say, now that
you are involved in the women's lib
movement, remember that we at
Newton City government have more
than 27 young ladies in positions of
direction, policy-making, not clerical
necessarily, Chairman of the Board
of Assessors, for example, things of
/that sort, so we are working with you
and we agree with your programs of
the future. So, if you feel like
marching, come up and see me — and
I'd love to have you.

I congratulate Lasell Junior
College for having selected such a
fine individual. I had the privilege of
breaking bread with Dr. Greene a very
short time ago, and I think that you
will all accept him and love him just as
much as those of us who realized
when we met him just how great he'd



be for not only Lasell Junior College,
but for the City of Newton.

The marriage of town and gown
is not always a happy one. But I must
say to you very explicitly, very clearly,
that the marriage of town and gown,
as far as the City of Newton and
Lasell Junior College is concerned,
has always been a very happy one and
I'm proud to have had some part of it.

I would like at this time to
present to you, Dr. Greene, the official
key to the city, as a welcome to the
city. As a matter of fact, I mentioned
once before this will not open the
treasury of the City of Newton to you.
That's on old cliche that I've used,
right now with the oil problem, and
since I'm about to issue a request to
your college and to other institutions
and industry to refrain from using more
oil, young ladies, than you need to,
by keeping your heat down to let's say
65 rather than 68, by turning off the
electricity to conserve power, the
key will not give you an open door to
the fuel shortage, but it will open our
hearts to you Dr. Greene and wish for
you all the best in the administration
of your office for many, many years.



The Installation of the President;
Mrs. Rosen delivering the charge
on behalf of the Board of Trustees:

Kenneth Myron Greene, the
trustees have selected you to be the
chief executive of Lasell Junior
College because they admire your
proven ability as a teacher and
administrator and respect the depth
of your concern for the problems
that face all of us in higher education
today; particularly your awareness
of the difficult choices young people
must make for themselves in a world
that is increasingly complex and
accelerated in nearly all of its aspects,
and your avowed dedication to high
academic and professional standards.

We stand in a troubled time in
the development of American
education, when the winds of change
and the voices of conflict and dissent
have swept across many campuses,
including our own, and the years
ahead will surely bring many chal-
lenges, many tests of our staying
power, many trials of our capacity to
deal with problems and issues we
cannot at present perhaps even con-
ceive. But we trust that the tributes
we have heard to your qualities of
leadership and the pledges of support
from your colleagues in all areas of
the college's life, auger well for your
years of stewardship and for the
creation under your guidance of a new
sense of community at Lasell.

We welcome you to the Lasell
family, as the tenth head of our
institution and its fifth president, with
confidence and with hope. Therefore
by virtue of the authority vested in
me by the Board of Trustees, I present
to you, Kenneth Myron Greene, the
charter of this institution and with
your acceptance declare you, Kenneth
Myron Greene, to be the fifth
president of Lasell.



ADDRESS, PRESIDENT KENNETH M. GREENE



Madam Chairman, distinguished
guests, members and friends of the
Lasell community, I thank you for your
most cordial welcome and ex-
pressions of confidence, and hope
that my conduct of the sensitive and
important office I have assumed
will justify the kind remarks that you've
made today. You will perhaps not be
surprised to know that when I
considered what I could say on this
occasion, my thoughts turned naturally
to experiences in my past that might
have particular impact on my re-
sponsibilities. I recalled, for instance,
how, when I started out in academic
life as an English instructor, one of
my most nagging obligations, it
seemed to me, was to come up with
good topics for the weekly themes my
students were supposed to write. In my
more despondent moments I would
think how lucky the students were:
they only had to write the themes not
devise the topics. At one point in my
first year, a sympathetic colleague
offered me counsel. Leaning back in
his chair and casually flicking cig-
arette ashes on a huge pile of un-
graded papers, he advised me that
when in doubt I could always use the
old "Head and Heart" theme topic
— that is the conflict of head (or
reason) and heart (or feeling). He
asured me that it would fit practically
any book we happened to be reading in
class, and as proof he pulled out a
worn sheet of paper and read from a
list of topics he had been using for
years: "Conflict of Head and Heart
in Return of the Native"; "Babbitt: a
study of the conflict of head and
heart"; "Jane Austen's Sense and
Sensibility: a demonstration of the
head and heart conflict"; and so the
list went . . . Tom Jones, Death of a
Salesman, H.M. Pulham, Esq., Fathers
and Sons, Sons and Lovers, Lady
Chatterley's Lover, and on and on.

Under the spell of this cynical
mentor, I almost came to believe that
the conflict of head and heart — or
the conflict of reason and feeling —
was something that occurred only
in books. But as the years passed (and
as I acquired enough inventiveness
in devising theme topics to relieve
my anxiety), I quietly noted how often
the conflict of head and heart entered
into decisions I had to make in real



life. And as I have sat at the presi-
dent's desk here at Lasell this summer,
pondering over decisions that have
to be made and courses of action
that must be chosen, I have had
occasion more than once to reflect on
that old conflict and to realize how
central it is to many of the problems
we are facing.

This is so partly because of the
nature of a collegiate community and
partly because of the economic,
social, and political pressures exerted
on that community by the world in
which it exists.

The college community is made
up of many different constituencies —
students, faculty, administrators, staff,
trustees, alumnae — each with different
— sometimes slightly different, some-
times vastly different perceptions of
the college. Perceptions of the college
as it was, as it is, as it should be.
Strong practical considerations on one
side are almost bound to conflict with
strong emotional considerations on
another. And to complicate matters
further, there may be emotional
positions conflicting among them-
selves, and there may be correspond-
ing conflict among different rational
positions.

Leaving aside these kinds of
complications for the moment, how-
ever, I imagine that our primary
concern will be to keep the practical
and emotional — that is, the head and
heart — in balance. In this hope I am
comforted by having read in Professor
Packard's commencement address of
last June a reminder to the college of
its duty "to defend objectivity and
rationality against sentimentality and
blind fanaticism." I heartily endorse
his recommendation to the faculty
that it protect Lasell, through its
vigilance, against "hazy romanticism.'

I think sometimes that we need
to be reminded, too, that sentimentality
is not necessarily confined to the
most obvious examples — and old
grad's fondness for Bragdon Hall, say,
or an undying attachment to the
senior prom. There are all kinds of
sentimentalities, including attachments
to certain concepts of teaching or
certain forms of governance. From
these attachments we must free
ourselves at least long enough to make



8



a rational appraisal of learning and
teaching and governing processes.
Because a certain course has always
been taught by the lecture method is
no infallible reason why it should
continue to be taught that way. And
just as there is nothing sacred about
a lecture, so there is nothing sacred
about a seminar, or having three
class meetings a week, or about
preserving a certain ratio of teachers
to students, or about departmental
hierarchies, or about the social rules
that govern student life.

But this does not mean that our
collective responses to these issues —
if and when they become issues
— should be impulsive and hazily
romantic. We simply must exercise
sound judgment; we must consider the
consequences of our decisions and
provide ourselves with the best
chances for making the best decisions.

I rather imagine that at the outset
of this decade, Lasell is going to
need direction somewhat more from
the head than from the heart. My
initial assessment of the college in-
dicates to me that it desperately needs
a systematic appraisal of its present
condition and character which
together with a wise reading of the
future of the world in which we are
going to have to exist will form the
basis for an intelligent long-range
institutional plan. Already this summer
the Long-Range Planning Committee
has embarked on the first phase of
what might be called a systems
approach to our problems. At the
request of that committee we have
begun to compile the statistical profile
of our present condition. We are, in
short, trying to understand precisely
where we are now so that we may
plan systematically our course for the
future.

If this seems to smack more of the
head than of the heart, I fear it must.
Unfortunately the times do not
encourage the luxury of sentimentality.
This is a time when some colleges are
closing down, when other colleges are
forced to such drastic steps as
freezing salaries and reducing the size
of faculties in order to survive.

The reasons for this sort of
emergency are not hard to find. On
the one hand there are pressures



on the colleges to expand and change:
the growing college population, for
instance; the rapidly changing
demands for new programs; the
students' dissatisfaction with irrelevant
learning experiences. On the other
hand there are pressures that make
expansion and change hard or
downright impossible to achieve:
namely, the growing dissatisfaction of
constituencies such as alumnae and
various government agencies whose
financial support is crucial to the
expansion and enrichment of col-
legiate programs; and, of course, the
rising costs of operating an institution.

The college, in short, is under
pressure to expand and change at the
same time that it is faced with rising
costs and diminishing budgets. When
this happens, as Economist Richard
Brien points out in an article in the
Educational Record, "the institution is
up against a management crisis. At
some time in the life cycle of virtually
every organization, its ability to
succeed in spite of itself runs out. That
is precisely where many American
colleges and universities find them-
selves today."

As you may guess, Professor
Brien's article recommends certain
management concepts and techniques
— specifically the sort of systems
approach I referred to a few minutes
ago. And jargon aside, I think we
must agree that Lasell needs a plan
that really means something.

If I needed any evidence to
convince me of this fact, I got it very
quickly at the beginning of my term
of office. One morning this summer,
the Newton Graphic announced to the
world that Lasell had received pre-
liminary approval of a government loan
of $1 ,005,000 for the construction of
a new dormitory. You can imagine with
what elation I heard the news (not
to mention my surprise at having got it
first from the Newton Graphic). In
any case, I was overjoyed. That we
need all the new dormitories we can
get is hardly debatable.

But the elation soon cooled down
as it became evident that we might
not be able to accept the loan. To
go fully into the exhaustive investiga-
tion we made of every possible
avenue of financing, to share with you



the details of the expert advice we
sought and received would take too
long. Suffice it to say that partly
because the loan would not cover the
full cost of the building and partly
because we do not have the money to
make up the difference or the
prospect of getting it (without slighting
other priorities) within the time limit
stipulated by the terms of the loan, I
was forced to recommend that the
Board of Trustees turn it down.

I cite this example not to dampen
your spirits, but rather to illustrate
the kinds of hard decisions that must
be made and the need for planning
that will at least minimize the chances
of our finding ourselves in such a
predicament again.

On the hopeful side I can assure
you that there are other ways to
accomplish our goals and that we are
exploring them even now. We need
not lose heart, nor need we lose our
heads.

In a new biography of Sir Walter
Scott, I came across a passage that
seems to apply to our case. The
biographer notes that Scott was
long categorized as a romantic. But
this biographer does not think this is
an accurate pegging of Scott, whose
head ruled his heart more often than
not and who was pragmatic if not
downright stoical about the writing
business. When he learned from his
publisher James Ballantyne that the
sales of his long poem "The Lord of
the Isles" were disappointing, Scott
replied: "Well, well, James, so be it —
but you know we must not droop, for
we can't afford to give over. Since
one line has failed, we must just try
something else."

It is worth noting too that the
something else that Scott tried was
"Waverly" and the thirty-one novels
that succeeded it — writing ven-
tures that made Scott a great success
and a wealthy man.

The moral of the story is, perhaps,
that we need a forceful combination
of head and heart. We must not,
indeed, droop. And as we try the
something else, let us bring all our
wisdom to bear on the decisions we
have to make and let us keep the
delicate balance between head and
heart.




INAUGURAL RECEPTION



President and Mrs. Greene were introduced to presidents of other
colleges in the Boston area at the Lasell Suite of the Marriott Motor
Hotel in Newton on the day following his inauguration. Dr. William E.
Park, who was President of Simmons College while Dr. Greene was
Chairman of its Department of Education, and Mrs. David Rosen, as
Chairman of the Lasell Board of Trustees, received college presidents
and their wives from more than 20 institutions in the Boston area.
Seen here are: (left) President and Mrs. Greene; (below) Dr. Burton C.
Hallowell, President of Tufts University, talking with Dr. Frederick C.
Ferry, Jr., President of Pine Manor Junior College, and to the right, Lasell
trustee Bruce B. Bredehoft; (lower left) Dr. Park and Dr. Mary I.
Bunting, President of Radcliffe College, with Dr. Greene; and (lower
right) Mrs. Rosen and Dr. Park.




10



^




The following is a report of contributions made to the
1969-1970 Lasell Alumnae, Inc. Annual Fund. Figures were
compiled for the period September 16, 1969 to September 25,
1970. After the summary, fund agents and contributors are
listed by Class.



Note: An"L" in front of a name indicates life member; an "x", a non-grad-
uate giver. Names of other life members appear at the end of each class list.



FINAL REPORT OF ALUMNAE FUND
CONTRIBUTIONS



The following summary includes contributors and contributions received up to and including September 24, 1970.

Total Total

Class Contributors Amount Class Contributors Amount



Classes to












1906


21


$ 595.00


1945


33


$ 607.00


1906


5


70.00


1946


27


375.00


1907


11


587.00*


1947


39


772.00


1908


1


200.00


1948


53


657.00


1909


4


40.00


1949


38


529.00


1910


7


280.00*


1950


51


864.00


1911


5


95.00


1951


45


467.00


1912


15


300.00


1952


40


472.00


1913


5


115.00


1953


42


438.00


1914


19


393.00


1954


51


657.00


1915


19


481.00


1955


64


874.00


1916


30


802.00


1956


58


667.00


1917


18


2097.00


1957


27


252.50


1918


15


735.00


1958


37


409.00


1919


17


326.00


1959


38


408.00


1920


18


442.50


1960


30


465.50


1921


18


1343.75


1961


45


411.00


1922


24


847.00


1962


37


413.00


1923


20


410.00


1963


22


165.00


1924


15


451.00


1964


33


372.00


1925


20


450.00


1965


38


471.00


1926


18


207.00


1966


32


238.00


1927


23


1072.00


1967


23


222.00


1928


20


453.00


1968


23


293.00


1929


38


649.00








1930


18


460.00


High School &






1931


23


423.00


Woodland Park






1932


26


455.00




4


35.00


1933


28


779.00








1934


17


330.00


Trustees, Faculty






1935


26


484.00


& Administration






1936


27


445.00




13


1112.50


1937


30


1177.50








1938


32


506.00


Club Gifts


9


650.00


1939


22


381.00








1940


23


500.00


Matching Gifts


(24)


1135.00


1941


42


5471.00








1942


35


454.00


TOTAL


1754


$40,600.25


1943


27


411.00








1944


20


451.00









Includes non-alumnae donor



12



CONTRIBUTORS



All Classes before 1906
Total contribution: $595.00

1896-97

Bessie Brainard Schmadeke

1899

L Evelyn Ebert Allen
L Alice R. Kendall
Mabel C. Marston

1902

Georgie Duncan Seavey
L Clara McLean Rowley
x Leonora Piper Jamieson
x Cora Stone Trimmer
x Bertha White Sprague

1903

Isabella Blackstock Beardsley

Agnes Drake Foss
L Edith Ebersole Doud

Mary Goodwin Olmsted
x Sara Lawrence White
x Josephine MacDonald Smith
x Lucia Parcher Dow

1904

Alice Stahl Seltzer

1905

Hazel Carey Adam

Nell Jones Yeomans
x Argenta MacDonald Carothers
x Eleanor Percy Irish

Other Life Members

Harriet L. Freebey '95
Emma Aull Duncan '98
Alice Jenckes Wilson '99
x Helen Ebersole Swartzel '03

1906

Total contribution: $70.00

Chairman
Helen Carter Kenway

Contributors

L Helen Carter Kenway

x Elizabeth Polhemus Rockwood
Julia Potter Schmidt
L Maude Simes Harding

x Elizabeth Thielens Miller

Other Life Members

Dorothea Turner Moulton
Elsie Young Hayden

1907

Total contribution: $587.00

Chairman
Lilian Douglass Heeb

Agents

Alice J. Chase
Fern Dixon Leahy

Contributors

L Fern Dixon Leahy

L Lilian Douglass Heeb

Lx Jennie Drew Hinman
x Carre Fuller Eldridge
Helen H. Heath
Clara Huttenbauer Levy
Clara F. Nims



x Sadie Peckham Mayers
x Carrie Sessions Dodge

Mr. George C. Dodge

In memory: Ida Sisson Craver

1908

Total contribution: $200.00

Contributor
L Grace Emerson Cole

Other Life Members

Grace T. Griswold
Elizabeth Love Macey

1909

Total contribution: $40.00

Contributors

Constance E. Blackstock
L Annie Crowe Collum
x Gertrude Leonard McClanahan
x Elizabeth Robinson Breed



1910

Total contribution: $280.00

Contributors

x Lucy Cox Nelson
Margherita Dike Hallberg
Ina McLean Hunt
Marguerite Murdock
Mildred Snyder Grant
M. Cornelia Stone

In Memory: Julia Crafts Sheridan
x Lucy Cox Nelson

Margherita Dike Hallberg

Marion Hale Bottomley
L Julia Hamilton Peters

Irma Levi Levy

Mildred Snyder Grant
x Ella Steenman Bryant

M. Cornelia Stone
L Josephine Woodward Rand

Mrs. Emma K. Tryon

Other Life Members

Nell Carneal Drew
Mildred Goodall Fairbanks

1911

Total contribution: $95.00

Contributors

Vera Bradley Findlay
x Helen Ferry Babcock
x Dorothy Frost Frost
L Marion Ordway Corley
x Margaret Thacher Drury

Other Life Members

Elizabeth Brandow Trumbull
Marion Shinn

1912

Total contribution: $300.00

Chairman
Ruth Coulter Bierer

Agents

Charlotte Lesh Coats
Marjorie Risser Blackwell

Contributors

Agnes Adelsdorf Weil
Emily Butterworth Pritchard
Ruth Coulter Bierer



Elizabeth Edson
Mary Goodwillie Townsend
Mildred Hall Leber
Marion Joslin Oppenheimer
F. Berenice Lincoln Beers
Annie Merrill David
Ethel Moore Richardson
Clara Parker Colby
Jane Parsons Westervelt
Marjorie Risser Blackwell
x Pearl Townsend
Winifred Whittlesey Knowlton

Life Members

x Hazel Drew Adair

Florence Jones Allen
x Sara Shuttleworth Houwert

1913

Total contribution: $1 15.00

Contributors

Alma L. Bunch
x Jean Humbird Dickason
x Edessa Warner Slocum
L Mildred Westervelt Warner
Adelle Wilson Moffett

Other Life Member
Ruth Trowbridge Brown

1914

Total contribution: $393.00

Chairman
Mary Quick Dean

Agents

Angeline Emery MacCulloch
Ruby Newcomb McCorkindale
x Dorothy Smith Tolman

Contributors

x Ruth Adt Stephenson

Helen Baird Vance (Deceased)

Mary H. Bingaman
L Lois Brader Buckner

Mildred Cutting Tucker
L Ruth Davis Giller

Maidie Dealey Moroney

Elsie L. Doleman

Angeline Emery MacCulloch

Marcia Fogg Moore

Dora E. Goodwillie

Dorothy Hartshorn Underwood

Carolyn B. Moore

Ruby Newcomb McCorkindale

Dorothy Payne Whiteway

Mary Quick Dean

Helen Rollins Fisher
x Edna Woolson Bean

Nellie Youngers Henkle

1915

Total contribution: $481.00

Chairman
Madeline Farmer Ryder

Contributors

Margrethe M. Bauman

Elizabeth Beach Bierer

Ida Beane Rice

Katharine Bingaman Heron
x Doris Brien Tamm
L Myrtle Brix Spangler

Catherine Carter Rasbach
x Dorothy Dale Smith

Florence Evans Valpey
x Madeline Farmer Ryder

Frances Johnsen Edwards

Ida Laubenstein Moyer
x Mamie Miller Eggers



Clara Paton Suhlke
x Emma Robinson Petrie

Martha Schumann Laubenstein

Doris Waller O'Hara
x Genevieve Watkins Stecker (Deceased)
L Nell Woodward Collins

Other Life Member
Ada F. Patterson

1916

Total contribution: $802.00

Chairman
Marion Griffin Wolcott

Agents

Dorothy Crane Crowe
Frances Harris Spear
Maude Hayden Keeney
Carol M. Rice

Contributors

x Rose Baer Trexler

Gertrude Baker Davis

Marian Beach Barlow
x Wilda Berkey Cartland

Dorothy Brate McPherrin
x Marjorie Collins Cisco-Smith

Dorothy Crane Crowe

Gertrude Dana Gordon

Lavinia Fera McKinney

Helen J. Foster

M. Adolphia Garnsey Ettinger

Helen S. Gerrett

Marion Griffin Wolcott

Sarah Hammond Brookes

Ruth Harris Frank

Lena Hauck Johnson

Maude Hayden Keeney

Dorothy Mathias Bates

Eleanor McCarty Thomas
L Helen Merrill Strohecker

Florence Morris Smith

Mildred Ordway Brahana

Helen Overholser Towle

Carol M. Rice
• Elizabeth G. Richards

Mabel Straker Kimball

Alma E. Sweet

Charlotte Whiting Clark

Ruth Winslow Payne
x Natalie York Terry

1917

Total contribution: $2097.00

Chairman
Ruth Burnap Jones

Agents

Florence Bell Merrill
Dorothy Deering Ewart
Nora Hayward Rodd

Contributors

x Lillian Astill Ainsworth
L Helen Bauman Roblin
L Florence Bell Merrill
Ruth Burnap Jones
Nora Hayward Rodd
Edith Hobson Fricke
x Edith Holman Dolliver
Alice Jenks Nickerson
Martha Keppel Hawkins
Virginia Moore Starkey
E. Marjorie Morrison Coburn
x Carita Palmer Clinard
Lenette Rogers Atkinson
L Helen M. Saunders (Trustee)
L Jessie Shepherd Brennan
L Mildred Strain Nutter
Mary Louise Taylor Gish
x Frances Wright

13



Other Life Members

Fannie Gates Frey
Helen Stephan Sterley



1918

Total contribution: $735.00

Contributors

L Lydia Adams Godsoe
L Dorothy Barnes Paine

G. Elaine Eaton Underhill
x Harriet Fera French

Helen Hart Lind
x Marian Harvey Higgins
x Frances Hunter Roberts

Barbara Mc Lei I an McCormick

Ruth B. Newcomb

Esther Norcross Dougherty
x Almira L. Shepard

Helen Smith Stone

Roxana Stark Burns
L Gail Wilson Boynton

Gladys Wright Webb

1919

Total contribution: $326.00

Chairman
Mercie V. Nichols

Agent
Edith Abbott Chapman

Contributors

Edith Abbott Chapman
x Judith Burbank Brown

Rosenda Cabrera

Olive Chase Mayo

Frances Coombs
x Mary Eshleman Willauer

Dorothy C. Hall

Marguerite Houser Hamlin (Trustee)

Helen Moss Post
x Elizabeth Moyer Wilson
L Mercie V. Nichols

Frances O'Brien Good
x Maria Orozco Cobb

Marian Owen Pollard

Ethel Ramage Lougee

Edith Vance Nicolson

Helen Webster Fitz

Sibyl Weymouth Braniff

1920

Total contribution: $44250

Chairman
Freda Griffin Leining

Agents

Dorothy Burnham Eaton
H. Eloise Carey Wadley
Marion Eaton Gumaer
Lillian G. Grant

Contributors

Frances Adams Pastene

Dorothy Balch McCormack
L Elaine Bass Pierce

Dorothy Burnham Eaton

H. Eloise Carey Wadley
L Anna Crane Sherwood

Marion Eaton Gumaer

Lillian C. Grant

Freda Griffin Leining

Alice Grimes Griffin

Marguerite Hardy Chandler

Ruth D. Hayden

Helen O'Brien Newman
x Dorothy Packard Klopp
x Marjorie Palmer VanBuren

Margaret Perley Downey
L Katherine Rice Broock
x Ruth Wardle Livingston

Other Life Members

x Carolie Abrams Painter

Doris Crawford Clovis

Isabel M. Fish
x Katherine Moss Shriner



1921
Total contribution: $1343.75

Chairman
Helen L. Beede

Agents

Pauline Butler Poore
Lillian Doane Maddigan
Mary King Sargent
Mildred Knight Norwood
Esther Story

Contributors

L Helen L. Beede
Doris Bissett Bryant
Thelma Blossom Ross
Doris Brown Bergin
Pauline Butler Poore
Dorothy Edwards Rodgers
Dorothy Ely Bigham
x Edith Geeson Seewald

Jeannette Geist Stanley
x Priscilla Ingraham Lamb
Mary King Sargent
Margaret Loomis Collingwood
L Ruth Rawlings Mott
Doris Sanborn Adams
Feme Smith Hodgins
x Madaline Smith Baker
L Esther Story
x Sarah Wild Gordon

Other Life Members

Lillian Doane Maddigan
x Helen Jacobs

Mildred Knight Norwood

Gladys V. Lucas

Julia Russell Robertson
x Mary C. Shannon

1922

Total contribution: $847.00

Chairman
Hariette Case Bi dwell

Agents

Jean Field Faires
Marjorie Gifford Grimm
Josephine Holbrook Metzger
Merjorie Lovering Harris
Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker
Mabel Rawlings Eckhardt
Theresa Thompson Osborne

Contributors



Florence Archibald Stanly
L Iverna Birdsall Lutze
L Harriette Case Bi dwell

Miriam Chollett Bershon

Vera Clauer Hans

Miriam Dailey Taylor L

L Florence Day Wentworth

Jean Field Faires L

Marjorie Gifford Grimm
L Helene Grashorn Dickson
x Elizabeth Laughlin Wadsworth

Marjorie Lovering Harris
L Elizabeth Madeira Campbell

Mildred Melgaard Rees
x Bertha Phelps Bogg
L Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker (Trustee)

In Memory of Deceased Classmates
L Mabel Rawlings Eckhardt

Thelma Schweitzer White

Mayno Seltzer Richmond
L Barbara Smith Huntington

A. Louise Stevens Prince
x Margaret Tibbetts Lowe
x Mabel Vernon Eidner
x Marion T. Weidman

Other Life Members

Frances Angel Levenson

Violet Comley Peirce

Sarah F. Crane

Grace Gates Brown

Josephine Holbrook Metzger

Louise Jackson Davol

Theresa Thompson Osborne (Trustee)

Jean Woodward Nelson



1923

Total contribution: $410.00

Chairman
Toni Meritt Smith

Agents
Carolyn Colton Avery

Contributors

x Marion Austin Hakewesselll

Florence Boehmcke Edmondson

Margaret Bullock Reed

F. Elizabeth Chandler Healey

Dorothy Chase Scott
L Ethel Cole Hoose
L Carolyn Colton Avery

Anne Daugherty Slater

Ruth Dinsmore Sayward
x Mary Godard Hadley

Helen Hinshaw Toohey
L Ruth Hopkins Spooner
x Lisinka Kuehl Dawson

Ida A. Markert
L Toni Meritt Smith (Trustee)

Dorothy K. Millspaugh
x A. Louise Orr Daniels

Claire Parker Everett

Jessie Watters
L A. Louise Woolley Morgan

Other Life Members

x Ruth Emery
Ruth Hills Livermore
Marjorie Lowell Weeks
Adrienne Smith Stone

1924

Total contribution: $451.00

Agents

Elizabeth Anderson Hanna
Edith Clendenin Stahl
Matilda Daugherty Linn
x Helen Davis Worthington
Helen B. Perry
Helen Robson Hamill
Maude Wilcox Hanley

Contributors

L Dorothy Ballou Collier

Elizabeth Barden Coulson

Adele Bigham Nelson

Frances Bliss Crosby
L Edith Clendenin Stahl

Matilda Daugherty Linn
x Helen Davis Worthington

Edith Hadley McLean
L M. Katharine Knox McClaren
L Helen B. Perry (Trustee)

Eleanor Rinebold Struve

Helen Robson Hamill

Katharine C. Webb
L Maude Wilcox Hanley

Geraldine Wilder Bogart
L Alice Wry Anthony



Other Life Member
Lucile Norris Leyda

1925

Total contribution: $450.00

Agents

Martha Fish Holmes
Dorothy Hagadorn Taylor
Estelle L. Jenney
Martha Wilcox Hills

Contributors

Class of 1925— Reunion Funds
; Sarah Barnum Maurer

Catherine Beecher Wood

Helene Berkson Hoover

Helen Black Sprague
: Ethel Clow Black

Dorothy Cook Hagen

Martha Fish Holmes

Dorothy Hagadorn Taylor

Louise Hegeman Whitman

Estelle L. Jenney

Katherine Kelley Gaul



Gertrude Kendall Lund
Alice Libbey Legare
L Helen Mc Nab Wil land
x Mary Saunders Houston
Virginia Smieding Fenn
Sylvia H. Solari
Eleanor L. Steele
x Madelyn Stover McGarry

Other Life Members

Ruth A. Buffington
Helen Wahlquist Shenning

1926

Total contribution: $207.00
Contributors

x Natalie Albury Boswell
Margaret Anderson Gage
Dorothy Aseltine Wadsworth

x Bernice Cunningham Smith
L Helen Duncan Devereux

In Memory:
Sara Foster Farnsworth
L Dorothy Hale Brown
Frances Hall Anderson
Mildred Hamlin Mather
Hazel Kramer O'Donnell
Grace Lawrence Groves
x Muriel L. McLauthlin
Gertrude Moeller Baum
Emma H. Ockert
Elizabeth Oppel Morris
Ruby Rice Troup
Madeline Roth White
Doris Schumaker Walthers

Other Life Members

Margaret Beck Hamlin
Sara Mackay Roblin
Elinor Stevens Stockman

1927

Total contribution: $1072.00

Chairman
Esther T. Josselyn

Agents

x Gladys Boardman Amos
Sylvia Chandler Hooker
Minerva Damon Ludewig
Elinor Day Conley
Clarice Haines Nevers
Loretta Krause Eyer
Marjorie Maxfield Smith
Rosanna McConnell Wallis
A. Katheryn Royce
Elizabeth Selkirk Chipps
Edith Thorpe Van Dine

Contributors

Lx Gertrude Bicknell Harvey

Rosalie Brightman Rosen (Trustee)
Edith Bronstein Silverman
Sylvia Chandler Hooker
Minerva Damon Ludewig
Elinor Day Conley
Clarice Haines Nevers
Margaret Hitt Perkins

L Esther T. Josselyn
Mary Keim Tietze
Loretta Krause Eyer

L Lucy MacLeod Helm
Marjorie Maxfield Smith
Rosanna McConnell Wallis
Ethel Noyes Hathaway
Dorothy Quimby Faure
Minnie Remick Dandison
x Marion Rice Severson
A. Katheryn Royce
Elizabeth Selkirk Chipps
Evelyn Suor Butterworth
Edith Thorpe Van Dine
C. Virginia Wellington Fauver

Other Life Members

Lilly Butters Schwartz
Alice Crawford
Madalyn Patten Hoberg
Madeleine Robinhold Leinbach
Janette Smock Simpson



14



1928

Total contribution: $453.00

Chairman
Lillian G. Bethel

Contributors

Margaret Basley Irwin
L Margaret H. Behrens

Lillian G. Bethel

Phoebe Dotten Low

Christina Finlayson Dana

Kathryn W. Forgey

Mary Goodwin Culver

Helen Hawes Loomis

Helen Head MacFarland

Caroline Hopkins McLean

Joan Johnson Doriot
x Bernice Kent Ennis
x Julia Klingensmith Frey

A. Josephine Laughton Hopkins
L Margaret Newman
x Alice M. Nydegger

Katherine Paige Colon

Hester Shaw Gordon

Elizabeth Smith Scollon

M. Gertrude Wagner

Other Life Members

Mary Timmins Moulthrop
Marjorie Winslow MacCuspie

1929

Total contribution: $649.00

Chairman
Alice Pratt Brown

Agents

Katherine Braithwaite Woodworth
Julia Clausen Bowman
Emily Crump Ramstetter
Dorothy Hayward Sutherland
Harriet Hewins Sanderson
Harriet Holt Buker
Marion Kingdon Farnum
Betty Lyman Zsiga
Helen Ohm Kingsman
Marjorie Parrish Green

Contributors

Esther Angel Frank

Mary Elizabeth Barton Libby

Preble Borden Gruchy

Katherine Braithwaite Woodworth

Charlotte Brooks Armstrong

Frances Brown Winthrop

Constance Chalmers Harlow

Julia Clausen Bowman

Dorothy Cole MacRae

Margaret Contrell White
L Rosamond Cornell Cannon

Emily Crump Ramstetter

Isabelle Daggett Wilson

Katharine Edwards Bennett

Dorothy England Chester

Barbara Goodell Trott

Jane E. Gray

Muriel Hagerthy Meikle

Annette Harvey Jensen

Harriet Hewins Sanderson

Eleanor C. Humphrey

Marjorie Kuehn Brock

Betty Lyman Zsiga

Frances Mann Knight
x Gwendolyn McDonald Black
x Marguerite Mcllvain Ricker

Helen Ohm Kingsman

Myra Page Haven

Eleanor Pitcher Hansen
L Alice Pratt Brown

Ruth Rowbotham Strickland

Marjorie Schaller Schoonmaker

Jeannette Smith Orne

Louise Thompson Rondelli

Elizabeth Wells Tuttle

E. Maude Williams Gittleson
Barbara Wilson Steele

F. Ellen Zacharias Cullen

Other Life Members

x Ruth Beckley Brown
Dorothy Hayward Sutherland



Marion Kingdon Farnum
Ruth E. Richards Stripp
Marion Simpson Lunt
Helena Willson Hanson



1930

Total contributions: $460.00

Chairman
Frances Smith Miller

Agents

Priscilla Barber Fitch
Joan Collier Cooper
Elizabeth Day Cook
Jeanette Gessner Somers
Helen Morgan Riederer
Elinor R. Taylor

Contributors

Class of 1930 — Reunion Fund

Dorothy Camin Rozan

Joan Collier Cooper

Corinne Cowdrey Murray

Elizabeth Day Cook
L Clara Dietz Rosen burg

Kathryn Dow Mathes

Jeanette Gessner Somers

Phyllis Jensen Swenson

Eleanor McKenney Black

Dorothy Meeker Pearce

Helen Morgan Riederer

Sylvia Morgan Williams
x Betty Richards Bogardus
x Ruth Richardson Pease

Charlotte Sherman Weiss

Frances Smith Miller

Dorothy Young Heath

Other Life Member
Dorothy Inett Taylor

1931
Total contribution: $423.00

Chairman
Mildred Bell Cole

Agents

x Marjorie Keller Mayer

Lenna Lyon Hill
x Jane Porter Brown

Ruth Rohe Smith

Helen M. Schaack

Dotha Warner Jope

Ruth Winslow Neulieb

Frances Wynkoop Benjamin

Contributors

Elizabeth Bear DeStaebler
Mildred Bell Cole
Lorraine Clark Wein
Betty Condit Kessel

In Memory: Betty Jean Daugherty

Karin Eliasson Monroe
L Sarah B. Fletchall

Clara Giarla Albiani

Ann Louise Houlihan

Jane Hupman Preston

Marion Inglis Leonard
x Marion E. Johnson
x Marjorie Keller Mayer

Lenna Lyon Hill

Marjorie Magune Curtis

Aline Paull Ireland
x Jane Porter Brown

Ruth Rohe Smith

Eunice Stack O'Connor

Pearl Thompson Hasey

Dotha Warner Jope

Frances Wheeler Sawyer

Blair Whittier Shepardson

Other Life Member
Virginia Riley Richardson

1932

Total contribution: $455.00



Chairman
Gertrude Hooper Ring

Agents

Marjorie MacClymon
Elizabeth Page Sealey
Marjorie Tarbell Quandt

Contributors

Ethel Buchanan Horner
L Charlotte Cahners Glass
L Julia C. Case

x Jane Ellison Ragan

x Nancy Fowler Marshall

x Carol Griffin Teich
Mildred J. Guyett
Katharine Hartman Macy
Gertrude Hooper Ring
Margaret V. Hrubec
Enid Jackson Giles

x Ruth Kniep Blanchard
Marjorie MacClymon
Jean McNab Weigand

x Nathalie C. Mosher
Elizabeth Page Sealey
Natalie E. Park
Betty Parrish Newman
A. Jeanne Price Crye
Minerva Pritchard Barratt
Elinor Small Domina
Carolyn Sproat Spigner
Gertrude Stone Baptiste
Marjorie Tarbell Quandt
Frances Turner Sleigh

x G. Althea Ward Weatherhead

Other Life Member
Edith Parsons Booth

1933

Total contribution: $779.00

Chairman
Shirley Gould Chesebro

Agents

Grace Dunne Walker
Barbara Edmands Place
Dorothy Guest Harney
Jeanne Heilig Noack
Elizabeth Mclntire Bennert
Anna Mills Koeck
Virginia Ogden Hayes
Charlotte Phillips Wilkins
Wilma Silvernail Berry
Harriet Smith Rawson

Contributors

x Eunice Andrews Brooks
Helen Bardua Chi Ids

x Drucille Bevin Vose

x Sylvia Browning Thompson
Helen C. Burwell
Dorothy Day Funk
Hope Decatur Rowland
Margaret DuBois Alexander
Barbara Erickson Rogers

x Dorothy Foss True
Shirley Gould Chesebro
Jeanne Heilig Noack
Amorette Larcher Skilton
Maude Lee Bliss
Elizabeth Mclntire Bennert
Anna Mills Koeck
Christine Murphy Hohner
Louise Newell Audette
Charlotte F. M. Ockert
L Virginia Ogden Hayes
Bertha Root Smith
Wilma Silvernail Berry
Ruth Stafford Clark
Barbara Stover Van De Bogert
Elizabeth Swift Coyle

x Sybil Thomas Ryder
Millicent Thomson Hammer

x Emeline Walker Fatherley

Other Life Members

x Laura Dietz Rudginsky
Angelita Santiago Gebelein

1934

Total contribution: $330.00



Contributors

Phyllis Atkinson Stone

Roberta Davis Massey

Edith Downey
x Helen Dunlap Kayes
x Caroline Frey Anderson

Helen Gibbs Studley

Helen Hall Streeter
L Mabelle Hickcox Camp

Marjorie Jones Hopkins

Barbara Kerr Marshman
L Celia Kinsley Percival

Dell L. Masterjohn

Carol Morehouse Jones

Gwen Murray Larsen

Bettina Potter Janse

Alice Schrade Van der Voort

Dorothy Secord Garon

Other Life Member
Virginia Leahy Berwick

1935

Total contribution: $484.00

Chairman
Eleanor Gebelein Greene

Contributors

Class of 1935 — Reunion Funds

Betty Jane Allenbaugh Weller

Barbara Briggs Stanton

Marion Cleveland Head

Harriet Colwell Reeves

Marion Cruickshank Manning
x Eleanor Dippel Reed

Eleanor Gebelein Greene

Gertrude Heath Kehoe
L Barbara Iris Johnson

Esther Joslyn Gross
L Barbara King Haskins

Roberta Leonard Matthews

Marjorie Long Maish

Barbara McKelleget
x Roberta Morrill Buchanan

Gertrude Morris MacCallum

Anne O'Brien Ryan

Eleanor Richardson Walker
L Mary Jane Selby Guerry

Mabel Swift Moore
L Molly Upham Menges

H. Virginia White Wardwell
L Priscilla Winslow

Priscilla Wood Caverly

Barbara Young Leach

Other Life Members

Sophia Latchis Lyras
x Miriam Nichols
Eleanor Ramsdell Stauffer



1936

Total contribution: $445.00

Chairman

Ruth Buswell Isaacson
Marjorie Bassett MacMillan
Bili Baxter Perkins
Virginia Hausler Heath
Margaret Pearl Ide
Ethel Stroud Hartley
Martha Sweetnam Pearson
Charlotte Weitzman Kaplan

Contributors

Selma Amdur Heringman
Marjorie Bassett MacMillan
Mary Bradley Brixner
Ruth Buswell Isaacson
M. Barbara Darcey Thomas
Dorothy Ell Strong
Phyllis Gunn Rodgers
Virginia Hall Warren
Emily Hubbel Weiss
Natalie Hutchison Clouser
Virginia Johnston Loud
Jeanne M. Keck
Arlene Kerr Sonnabend
Ruth Keyes Wendt
Ruth Koritzky Kopelman
Mary Murray Nash
Dorothy Paine Chaucer



15



L Margaret Pearl Ide

Marjorie Reed Colley

Janice Remig Kelley

Helen Saul Foxwell
x Adelaide Shaffer Campbell
L Audrey Smith Henderson

Martha Sweetnam Pearson
x Georgian na Taber Cotter

Charlotte Weitzman Kaplan

Deborah York

Other Life Member
Muriel Ray Hunt

1937

Total contribution: $1 177.50

Chairmen

Priscilla Parmenter Madden
Louise Tardivel Higgins

Agents

Dorothy Acuff Stone
Frances Austin Beaumier

x Anne Campbell Terrill
Dorothy Coffin Amon
Irene Dreissigacker Brimlow
Jane Eldridge Meaney
Helen Flint Moody
Louise Hedlund Mercer
Marjorie Hills Buffington
Barbara Lane Roper
Glennys Preston Allicon
Rae Salisbury Richards
Lois Small Redden

x Anne Tipton Gardner
Louise Visel Redfield
M. Virginia Webb Tompkins
Barbara Wheeler Sampson

Contributors

Dorothy Abbott Atherton
Frances Austin Beaumier

x Anne Campbell Terrill
Irene Dreissigacker Brimlow
Edith Fitzgerald Arnold
Helen Flint Moody
Dorothy Forsstrom Spotanski
Barbara Harding Kakas
L Betty Harrington Van Huysen
Louise Hedlund Mercer
Marjorie Hills Buffington

x Catherine Laffin Mahoney
Betty Olson Cooper
Madeline Orcutt Arthur
Janet Owens De Arment
Priscilla Parmenter Madden
Glennys Preston Allicon

x Mary Ruth Sanford Hall
Emily Saxton Braman
Meta Searles Hopkins
L Marian Sleeper Hall

x Viola Smith Williams
Florence Stetson Pipes
L Louise Tardivel Higgins (Trustee)
Meredith Tillotson Richardson
M. Virginia Webb Tompkins
Marjorie Westgate Doran
Barbara Wheeler Sampson
Augusta Williamson Lips
Elizabeth A. Wisdom

Other Life Members

Margaret Harris Abreu
Eleanor Kenney Hettrick



1938

Total contribution: $506.00

Chairman
Arlene Wishart Sylvester

Agents

Winifred Aldrich Chapoton
Ruth Fulton Griffin
Margaret Jones Howry
Elizabeth Leland Kibbe
Eleanor Pierce Puffer
Mildred Royce Moffett
Faye Wadhams Smith
Elizabeth Yeuell Collins



Contributors

Winifred Aldrich Chapoton
x Eleanor Ayers Ware
Betsy Bassett Wells
S. Joanne Bohaker Smith
Olive Boynton Garron
Elizabeth Clark Brighton
Ruth Fulton Griffin
Mary Jane Holton Bohling
Barbara Jeppesen Thomann

L Margaret Jones Howry
Dorothy B. Keyes
Janet Kunkel Funkhouser
Elizabeth Leland Kibbe
Alice-Kristine Lockwood Leach
Eleanore Loeffler Olsen
Margaret T. McEnerney
Trithena McFarland Argo
Ruth Meighan Gillette
Elaine Meiklem Sargent
Carole Myers Lowe
Harriet Newcomb Stoughton
Eleanor Pierce Puffer
Jean Randall Dockham
Florence Rawson Skitt
Martha Romaine Jones

L Alice M. Seidler

L B. Lee Shepard Wilgus
Audrey Spiller Smalley
Virginia Squiers Read
Faye Wadhams Smith
Arline Wishart Sylvester
Elizabeth Yeuell Collins

Other Life Members

Priscilla Barker Neff
Mildred Birchard Pentheny
Betty Black Boynton
M. Adele Brown
x Eleanor Dresser Gross
Constance Hatch Herron
Mildred Royce Moffett

1939

Total contribution: $381.00

Chairman
Margaret Schneider Thieringer

Agents

Ruth Conklin Anderson
Jeanne Daniels Wheeler
Margaret Fish Allsopp
Helen Forsberg Powers
Norma Jacobus Riddle
Janice Marr Demer
Cora Pratt Gillett
Helen Richardson Bonander
Ruth Shepard Cushman
Harriet Tifft Longley
Marian Traxler Crum
x Ruth Waldron Anderson

Contributors

Barbara Albrecht Minnig

Nancy Allen Schmetzer

Mary Brett Wiss
x Laura Cobb
x Mary Corcoran Franich

Mary Curtin Duane

Margaret Fish Allsopp

Helen Forsberg Powers

Helen Henderson Chillingworth

Norma Jacobus Riddle

Louise A. Johnson

Jane Leckie Tracy

Jean Michael Petersen

Georgia Pierce Steck

The Estate of: Agnes M. Neu

Cora Pratt Gillett
x Mildred Sheldon Steele

Marian Traxler Crum

Betty Wallace White

Parthena Whipple
x Janet Whitten Smith
x Dorothy F. Williams

Life Members

Marjorie Dietz Jacobs
Ruth Shepard Cushman

1940

Total contribution: $500.00



Contributors

Esther Bennett Quinlan
Dorothy Cooke Leary
Delpha Corazza Marchetti
Pauline DiTullio Monaco
Bette Ellis Martin
Florence Evans McLaughlin
Dorothy Farnum Moore
Ruth Fulton Rardin
Lillian M. Grace
Jeanne Hubbard Brooks
Jane Hutchison Wulfing
Pat Kieser

Sibyl Lander Fletcher
Edythe Mac Donald Dowd
Jean MacNeish Rand
Mary Mathews Dilts
Elizabeth Phillips Dick
Barbara T. Quirk
Grace Roberts Gummersall
Barbara Schilf Fournier
Marjorie G. Sherman
Luceal Welsh Berni
Helen Woodward Fassett

1941

Total contribution: $5471.00

Chairman
Virginia M. DeNyse

Agents

Jane Ansley Sundborg
Lucille Armand Boyle
Geraldine Bixby Averill
Jean Bohacket Pegram
Susan Cairoli Peck
Jean Cooney Leitch
Kathryn Davis Almeida
Mary Doig Nicholson
Norma Forsberg Burman
Lucille Hooker Paterson
Janet Jansing Sheffer
Louise Lorion DeVries
Betty McGrath Brown
Dorothy Mellen Harwood
Elna Pollard Hanson
Alice Jean Townsend Kerslake
Ellen Visscher Taft
Marvine Weatherby
Lucille Wielandt Speight

Contributors

Mary Elizabeth Allen Ryan
Virginia Black DeLong
Nancy Bommer
Dorothy Brewer Carlson
Ann Buckle Fischer
Imogene Caney Fair
Josephine Caruso Kuchera
Jean Cooney Leitch
Elizabeth Danker Trenholm
Betty Davis Trow
Virginia M. DeNyse
Gertrude E. Fischer
L Marian Fitts Stern kopf
Norma Forsberg Burman

x Lora Green Buckingham
Marion Greene Anderson
L Harriet Hanson Nelson
Patricia Herke Ferguson
Janet Jansing Sheffer
Nancy Keach Paine
Jacqueline Lander Schofield
Louise Lorion DeVries
Marie MacGregor Woodward
Dorothy Macomber Vannah

x Joyce Master Foster

x Paula Maue Dickson
Betty McGrath Brown
Marjorie Mead Carlson
Dorothy Mellen Harwood
Lois E. Newton
Marion Parmer Wheeler
Eleanor Pfaff Daly
Elna Pollard Hanson
Eleanor Rawson Preston
Mary Sawyer Phil pott
Grace Sheffer Hendrick

x Marion Thomas Ashenden
Marian Timpson Intemann
Marvine Weatherby
Lucille Wielandt Speight

x Marjorie Williams Lovejoy
T. Arax Zulalian Johnian



Other Life Members

llene Derick Whelpley
Charlotte Lakeman Patt
Dorothy Stuhlbarg Kopple



1942

Total contribution: $454.00

Chairman
June Cherry Bruns

Agents

Elizabeth S. Allen
Marjorie Allyn Merrill
Shirley Armstrong Blount

x Jean Barnes Butts
Marion Beers Jamieson
Barbara Berkman Sherman
Marcia Corey Hanson
Eleanor Easterly Vogt
Shirley Egglefield Schless
Nancy Gorton Ross

x Margaret Grover Scott
Margaret Homan Kreter

x Phyllis Johnson Klein

x Helen Keenan Centlivre
Nancy Larsen Holbrook
Constance Lynch Walsh
Katherine Nannery Rafferty
Barbara Rockwell Tweddle
Ruth Turner Crosby

Contributors

L Elizabeth S. Allen
Marjorie Allyn Merrill

Lx Jean Barnes Butts

Barbara Berkman Sherman
Doris Bracher Jenkins
x Rebecca Cahoon Ames
June Cherry Bruns
Helen Cizek Niedhnghaus
Barbara Col I ester Moore
Shirley Egglefield Schless
Constance Fanget Driver
Mary Ann Fisher Espy
Dorothea F. Godfrey

L Nancy Gordon Ross
x Margaret Grover Scott
Anne E. Haskell
Dorothy Higson White
Margaret Homan Kreter
Mary Hurley Cook
Elizabeth Hutchison Buttrick
Nancy Larsen Holbrook
Doris Leach Almeida
Mary Ellen Metzger Simpson
Margot Moore Harley
Dorothy Mosher Stone
Gwendolyn Prouty Bellinger
Marjorie Ray Blackett
Virginia Robinson Nast
Barbara Rockwell Tweddle
Ruth Roughgarden Frank
Gertrude Ruch Kauffman
Ruth Turner Crosby
Arline G. Walter
Barbara Walworth Starr
Anne Witney Shea

Other Life Member
Mildred Slaunwhite Straw

1943

Total contribution: $411.00

Chairman
Jeanne A. Revene

Agents

Gertrude Baninger Duquette
Frances Beebe Jones
Mildred Bond Fincken
Carolyn Boyce Richards
Jean Burroughs Rawson
Frances Church Sampson
Dorothy Coffin Bauer
Jane Glassbrook Hamilton
Elizabeth Gorton Collier
Marilyn Isenberg Barnes
Lynn Kuch Jones
Elinor Kuchler Hopkins
Dorothy Marr Peckham
Eleanor Millard Parsons



16



Eloise Moffett Harper
Nathalie Monge Stoddard
Elizabeth Moore Young
Barbara S. Pearson
Elaine Towne Batson
Joyce Wagner West
Shirley Wolcott V,ells

Contributors

Cynthia Austin Sharp

L Gertrude Baninger Duquette
Dorothy Bentley Nichols
Carolyn Boyce Richards
V. Jean Brigham Martin
Carol Brumond Allen
Jean Burroughs Rawson
x Jane Cook Cardoza

Lx Phyllis Edmiston Olstad
Mary Franklin Woods
Elaine Kemp Johnson
Elinor Kuchler Hopkins
Nancy Leavis Bailey
x Dorothy Lingo Stebbins
Eleanor Millard Parsons

L Nathalie Monge Stoddard
Barbara S. Pearson
Priscilla Redfield Potter

L Jeanne A. Revene

F. Marian Rushton Miller
Barbara Schaufele McBride

L H. Elizabeth Schmidt Morrill
Virginia Shaw
Elizabeth Smith Roy
Olive N. Swanson
x Barbara Thorn burg Donnelly

L Joyce Wagner West

Other Life Members

Elizabeth Gorton Collier

Priscilla Houghton

Marjorie Langworthy Hegeman

Martha Maddock Heffner

Grace Marble Phil brick

Joan Moller Brown

Elsinor Prouty Mallory



1944

Total contribution: $451.00

Chairman
Virginia Wolfe Perkins

Agents

Anne Calder Dick.
Betty Fleer Cooper
Millicent Greason Booth
Shirley Haviland Woody
Margaret Hermann Raiche
Lorrayne Hron Reynolds
Eleanor Kimmey Shaw
Ruth Perkins Goodwin
Elfreda Reck Dubin
Peggy Revene Winans
Barbara Staples Virgie
Dorothy Tobin Staffier
Imogene Williams Genewich

Contributors

Dorothy Bensinger Meyers

Jean Campbell

Jodie Coudon McCluskey

Eleanor Del Bianco Kosow

Jessie Doig Clark

Mary Elizabeth Donnelly Chapman

Pat Frangedakis Pitcher

Marion Gooding Christensen

Barbara Goodwin Flint

Millicent Greason Booth

Carolyn Hill Plumer

Jane Maynard Robbins

Virginia Nelson Lake

Dorothy Nickerson Tehan

Ruth Perkins Goodwin

Elfreda Reck Dubin

Ann Scott Thompson

Vivian SnowOhlhorst

Dorothy Tobin Staffier

Virginia Wolfe Perkins

Other Life Members

Norma Dietz Tarlow
M. Shirley O'Connor



1945

Total contribution: $607.00

Chairman
Dorothy Piper Bottalico

Agents

June Ahner Gilroy
Eleanor Bradway Lammers
Lillian Feneley Cooley
Naomi Lederman Grossman
Marion Munro Waitt
Priscilla Otis Drew
Barbara Preuss Reynolds
Drucilla Roberts Bickford
Suzanne Ross Westberg
Elsie Simonds Follett
Susan Slocum Klingbeil
Martha Stonebraker Ely

Contributors

June Ahner Gilroy
Constance Arley Brown
Marilyn Babbitt Cooper
x Miriam H. Black
Eleanor Bradway Lammers
Jane Calderwood Price
Anne Carlin Schofield
Marguerite Clark McManus
Edith Copp Carey
Bernice Coyne Boon
Janet Eaton Maynard
Irene M. Evangelisti

L Emma Gilbert Carver
Shirley A. Gleason
Nancy Gregg Kellas
Carol Hauber Mitchell
Jean Henry Goggins
x Dorothea Kord Scott

L Naomi Lederman Grossman
Rosamond Lees Gow
Elaine Macdonald Aldrich
Marilyn McNie Middlebrook
Lynn Metzger Pharo
Priscilla Otis Drew
Constance Pettigrew Edie
Barbara Preuss Reynolds
Priscilla Robbins Stahl
Susanne Ross Westberg
Annette Saacke Cherry

L Susan Slocum Klingbeil
Martha Stonebraker Ely
Barbara Wentworth Dean
Doris Winkemeier Dieffenbach

Other Life Members

x Elizabeth D. Knox
Elaine McQuillan Marston
Althea Taylor Goldberg

1946

Total contribution: $375.00

Chairman
Marjorie Norris Harris

Agents

Marilyn Blodgett Hall
Margaret Harman Salisbury
Mary Jane Magnusson Megroz
Lee Parker McBurnie
Constance Wilbur Dowden

Contributors

Anne Blake Perkins
Marilyn Blodgett Hall
Raemary Chase Duryea
Marilyn Dickson Liebenguth
Kathleen Ford Allison
Ruth W. Goldner
Margaret Harman Salisbury
Barbara Harris Ryan
Molly Ing Louis
Lennie Lobl Hootstein
Patricia Luther Wilkin
x Eloise Macintosh Dexter
Mary Jane Magnusson Megroz
Deborah Newton Warren
Ruth Nordstrand Emery
Marjorie Norris Harris
Norma O'Shea Delaney
Lee Parker McBurnie
Nancy L. Peterson



Louise Pool Langley
x Betty Jane Scrimgeour Reney
Nan Somerville Blowney
Carolyn Stuart Scantlebury
Jean Thiel Weld
Joan Walker Doane
Jean Watson Wetrich
Kathryn Woolaver Parsons

Life Member
x Jean Davis Putnam

1947

Total contribution: $772.00

Chairman
Joan Lambert Laffin

Agents

Margaret Beach Otis
Elaine Capone Hixon
Betty Jane Cnossen Whitehead
Millicent Entwistle Harmon
Joan Familton Gardner
Betsy Frew
Marcia Kesseli Allen
x Linda Koempel Tompkins
Margaret Leary Hacker
Betty Ann MacNeil Lentini
Mary Murray Sutton
Rhoda O'Donnell Erickson
Mary Ellen Roberts Gill
Jean Sharron Strong
Elizabeth Waters Hartman

Contributors

Barbara A. Adler
x Anne Barton Twitchell
Margaret Beach Otis
Margaret E. Brion
Patricia Brunner Thiede
Sarah Cross Finigan
Lorna Earle Ingraham
Millicent Entwistle Harmon
Joan FitzGerald Cole
Charlotte Fletcher Kelly
Betsy Frew

Phyllis Haviland Hildebrandt
Janice Hayden Cummins
Shirley Johnson Dow
M. Joan Jones VanAnglen
Mollie Kendrick Pike
Mary Kinney O'Connell
Frances Lake Gray
Joan Lambert Laffin
Margaret Leary Hacker
Joanne McMillan Mars
Jean Morgan Koenitzer
Mary Murray Sutton
Nancy Noble Ehrman
Rhoda O'Donnell Erickson
Dorothy Papani Palmer
Shirley Porter Snetsinger
Nancy Pursel Tupper
Doris Smith
Janet Stearns Gil le
Phyllis Sykes Brown
Gloria Sylvia Paolella
Marion Taylor Sanderson
Jane Trott Burgon
Susan Voss Harrigan
Elizabeth Waters Hartman
Sally Waters Manning
Helen Widenor Bailey
Betty Williams McGowan

Life Members

Nancy Collett Hendricks
Olga Diamond Lake
x Ruth Park Lanier

1948

Total contribution: $657.00

Agents

Virginia Bailey McAllister
Elizabeth Bain Hagerstrom
Joanne Block Wilkinson
Evyor Briggs Gaskill
Janet Campbell Woodburn
Anne Chapman Berl
Mary Detwiler Fides
Muriel Diversi Cuddy



Carol Galligan Massard
Florence Keeney Havens
Martha Kennedy Ingersoll
Judith Macintosh Menella
Lois Mc Lucas Martin
Shirley Miller Carroll
Eleanor T. Munro
Dorothy Page Kuehl
Jacqueline Pfeiffer Lueth
June Smith Noreen

Contributors

Margaret Abrahamian
Frieda Alexander
Jane Anderson Calhoun
Virginia Bailey McAllister
Anne L. Behrendt

x Virginia Butt Grey
Betsy Curtis Winquist
Cecelia Davenport Weidmann
Barbara Davis Whipple
Miriam Day Butcher
Mary Detwiler Fides
Paul Drake Hodgdon
Elizabeth Duffill Bertuccelli
Joanne Eaton Friborg
Jane Edsall Jacobs
Carol Galligan Massard
Louise Gleason Chock
Ardell Goodman Baker
Patricia Green halgh Barrows

x Charlotte Guptill Norcross
Virginia Hall Anderson
JoAnn Hanson Long
Dorothy Hayes Kattell
L Florence Keeney Havens
Martha Kennedy Ingersoll
Beulah Kwok Sung
Irma Lipsitt Wolfe
Judith Macintosh Menella
Betty Mahoney Themal

x Harriet Markham Wedeman
Lois Mc Lucas Martin

x Patricia Mertz Manning
Jeanne Meyer Bird
Shirley Miller Carroll
Eleanor T. Munro
Janecke Naess BoMadsen
Barbara Noel Garvin
Barbara Noyes Walsh
Dorothy Page Kuehl
Elsie Paulson Chapman
Jacqueline Pfeiffer Lueth
Dorothy S. Piranian
Barbara Rymer Cole
Betty Scott Swift
Mary Small Lee

x Barbara Smith McConnell
June Smith Noreen
Barbara Snook Haggerty
Barbara Street Berry
Shirley Thome Brady
Alice Vavoudes Lindblad
Jeanne Williams Walz
Dolores S. Winslow

Other Life Members

Elizabeth Bain Hagerstrom
Margaret Hanson Marion



1949

Total contribution: $529.00

Chairman

Nancy Lawson Donahue
Joanne Molan Wheaton

Agents

Carol Cedergren Salerno
Carolyn Clark Thomas
Pauline Donaldson Converse
Gloria Ellis Tompson
Elizabeth Felker Hancock
Mary Ellen Fiske Brubaker
Natalie Hall Campbell
Nancy Hayden Drooff
x Ann Mitchell VanDeusen
Ellen Morris Phillips
Kathryn Poore Hamel
Barbara Potier Grey
Priscilla Randall Hurter
Emogene Starrett Anderson
Joan Weiler Amow



17



Contributors

Ann Ashley Sanderson
Barbara Berry Roberts
Barbara Childs Hussey
Jean Cook Jacobs
Barbara Ann Davis Collins
Mary Ellen Fiske Brubaker
Natalie Hall Campbell
Elizabeth Honywill Horgan
Martha Hurd Davenport
Eva Laitinen Stromski
L Nancy Lawson Donahue
Janice Levenson Sherman
Irene Lupien Murphy
Margaret Maclnnes Miller
Meredith McKone Krieger

x Ann Mitchell VanDeusen
Joanne Molan Wheaton
Ellen Morris Phillips
Nancy Newhall Macay
Shirley Olesen Somes
Diane Palady Barry
Julia Parker Haas
Kathryn Poore Hamel
Barbara Potier Grey

x Marilyn Prince Karcher
Priscilla Randall Hurter
Joyce Rathbun Spadone
Eleanor Ritchie Elmore
Fay Robbins Morehouse
A. Marilyn Ross
Alice Smales Young
Joan Stowe Pedersen
Betty Vail Morrissey
Jane Wadhams Hazen
Joan Warren Hepburn
Janet White Mac Lure
Cynthia Woodward Witherell
Dorethea Zuschlag Torgersen

1950

Total contribution: $864.00

Chairman
Sally Hughes Fasick

Agents

Marilyn Bartlett Erratt
Margot Bergstrom Semonian
Anne Carpenter Towle
Joyce Davies Harrison
Lois Form Senft
Dorothy Goehring Rourke
Helen Graham Gordon
Joan Hahn Fern
June Handleman Gilmartin
Joan Harrington Price
Doris Oneal Becker
Lillian Reese Roche

Contributors

20th Reunion Surplus

Marilyn Bartlett Erratt

Nancy Bean Lord

Margot Bergstrom Semonian
x Deborah Brush Morse

Nancy Coggeshall Foose

Marcia Collingwood Martin

Mary Jane Corral lo Noel

Jean Davies Stanley

Joan Dorau Hohorst

Laura Eckert Gatto

Lois Form Senft

Nancy Frank Daly

Dorothy Goehring Rourke

Helen Graham Gordon

Lorraine Grontoft Sutton

Joan Hahn Fern

Janice Halligan Maria

Marilyn Haynes

Barbara Hires Baxter

Nancy Houde Dyer

Carol Husted Schneider

Betty Jones Bolton

Helen Kovalinas lerardi

Mary Leighton Wood

Ariel Leonard Robinson

Lois Lincoln Dugdale

Anne Mastin Egner

Marilyn Munson Farrar

Janet Murphy George
x Janice O'Brien Almond

Doris Oneal Becker

Jean Ostrander Lowman

Jane A. Perry



Anne Pomeroy Bailey
Lillian Reese Roche
Ruth Rosebrock Hardie
Carmen Santo Grimshaw
Barbara Schnelle Orton
Winifred A. Schulman
JoAnne Secor Rier
Dolores Slingerland Lundquist
Helen Spackman Wilson
June Spottiswoode Beaulieu
Marie Sutton Caulfield
Jacquelyn Temperley Dey
Dorothy Torner Monahan
Beverly Walker Ward
Gloria Warner Farrell
Helen A. Wetherbee
Jean Woods McNeilly

Life Member
Elaine Orth Rodey

1951
Total contribution: $467.00

Chairman
Joan Kearney Cormay

Agents

Elizabeth Baumbach Hyne
Marilyn Clark
Ann Fish Shriber
Joan Groccia Cowan
Shirley Hannafin Adams
Carol Hess Recco
Barbara Hill Breen
Charlotte Kelley Campbell
Jean Kilgore Owen
Rosalie Kolligian Demarjian
Joan D. Le Frank
Nancy Mitchell Quinn
Patricia Raeder Crone
Katherine Rothe Matson
Jean Schuster Robbins
Janice Weyls Moore
Mary Jane White Miller
Joan Williams Arnold
Robin Witt Mosher
Joanne Zeigler Dupen

Contributors

Joan Alkire Behrle

Elizabeth Allison Smuts

Norma Appleyard

Claudette Awad Razook

Kathleen Ballard Heck

Carol J. Bancroft

Elizabeth Baumbach Hyne
x Lorna Becker Harrington

Etta Burns Peters

Lucille Chase Oldham

Marilyn Clark
x Janet Cotter Dow

Dorothy Delasco Sines

Edna Duge Watson

Libbie Fleet Glazer

Janet For n off Hauber

Margaret Gardner Larkin

Nancy Green Curry

Shirley Hannafin Adams

Lois Hutchinson Woodward
x Maureen A. Kane

Joan Kearney Cormay

Jean Kilgore Owen

Marjorie Kleindienst Guidera

Roberta Morin Aronowitz

Ann Murray Reynolds

Beverly Pink Reynolds

Elaine Quavillon Tull

Claire Quinzani Kerins

Patricia Raeder Crone

Bonnie Reis Doe

Nancy Rice Hopkins

Peggy anne Riker Miller

Joan Seremeth Teague

Barbara Sessions Reiley

Anna Stevenson Mangano

Janet Stewart Pacetti

Alice Stover Kachline

Jo-Ann Vojir Massey

Gertrude Wagner Simmons

In Memory: Mary Ellen Wait
Joyce Weitzel Flanagan
Janice Weyls Moore
Janet Woodward Powers
Joanne Zeigler Dupen



Life Member
Mary Jane Clark Maurici

1952

Total contribution: $47Z00

Agents

Nancy Cool Kaercher
Mary Diggs Stafford
Lois Hickey Treacy
Barbara Kane Mull in
Jean McCambridge
Eleanor Mekelon.es Marple
Naomi Peck Kroner
Barbara Rost Goodman
Nancie Shean Roth
Ann Woods Talbot

Contributors

Ann Alden Allen

Betty Beasley Petermeyer

Joyce Carroll Mulcahy

Pauline Coady Goodwin

Ann Dudley O'Neil

Ruth Easterlind Cederberg

x Virginia Easton Simpson
Betty Lou Foy Reid
Carol Frank Sweeney
Teresa Giordano Martignetti
Phyllis Gleason Riley
Nancy Gotier Fein
Lois Hickey Treacy
Judith Horton Koch
Joyce Kitfield Anderson
Jean E. McCambridge
Eleanor Mekelones Marple
Mary Moore Plunkett
Patricia Moulton Cudmore

x Mae Murphy McAleenan
Marlene Murray Zuker

x Nancy Norton Thalheimer
Jane Packard Ackley
Naomi Peck Kroner
Carol Perkins Oelsner
Joanne Purcell Brooker
Joeyna Raynal Rearwin
Marguerite Rudolf Mesinger
Elsie Sal kind Scotti
Joan Siebert Mege
Rena A. Silverman
Joan Stillwell Smith
Martha Thomas Hasak
Margaret Thompson Wheatley
Barbara Trout Krohn
Joyce Wardle Chapman
Dorothy Webb Slack
Barbara Wenzel Boucher
Phyllis Werblow Strompf
Nancy Whelton Herold

Life Members

Marilyn McGuire Levine
Dorothy Rich Anderson

1953

Total contribution: $438.00

Chairmen

Elsie Knaus Klemt
Elizabeth Sleight Dexter

Agents

Judith Brewer Campbell
Phoebe Byrd Gregory
Nancy Chase Ferguson
Ruletta Coats Stryeski
Leonora Coronella Krueger
Joan Darelius Chirnside
Louise Dawe Turner
Cynthia DeGelleke Cole
Evelyn Earle Lukeman
Sally Garratt Dean
Martha Gries Davis
Jeannette Roberts Mann
Harriet Hickok Brown
Barbara E. Howell
Doris Hungerford Zaenglein
Althea Janke Gardner
Marie Kaden
Jean Smith Di Leone
Beverly Thornton Hallowell
Virginia Wilder Melitz



Contributors

Joan Antupit Stillman

x Jane Bascom
Nancy Bilezikian Kamborian
Judith Brewer Campbell
Mary Louise Burke Alexander
Nancy Chase Ferguson
Jean Christiansen Lucas
Ruletta Coats Stryeski
Elinor Cohen Goldman
Leonora Coronella Krueger
Elaine Cowles Doolittle
Diane Cueny Harden
Joan Darelios Chirnside
Louise Dawe Turner

x Jane Doderer Sampson
Mary Ann Donahue
Evelyn Earle Lukeman
Nancy Fitzpatrick Manning
Shirley Gibbons San Soucie
Janet Gleason Nolan
Martha Gries Davis
Elaine Harper Johnson
Janet Hart Wilson
Ruth Henning Sump
Deborah Higgins Hergenrother
Doris Hungerford Zaenglein
Althea Janke Gardner
Marie R. Kaden
Elsie Knaus Klemt
Audrey Lang Clark
Theresa Lopas Speight
Molly McBride Kalogeros
Greta Nilsson Masson
Janet Pearson Hauck

x Constance Peterson Sloan
Sylvia Pfeiffer Nesslinger
Jeanne Schur Sommers
Jean Smith Di Leone
Mary Thomas Justice
Audrey Thompson Rielle
Jean Weeks Hanna
Virginia Wilder Melitz

1954

Total contribution: $657.00

Chairman
Sandra Reynolds Grant

Agents

Rita Keevers Claflin
Patricia Kelsey Scharf
Elizabeth Lindsay Buhler
Sandra MacDougall Sullivan
Ruth Paetz Braun
Joan Pickett Morrow
Sara Rojas Casarella
Carol Sharpies Pyle
Marilyn Taylor Ames

Contributors

Mary Allen Saunders
Carol Bagley Jackson
Carolyn Berghahn Whitman

x Carolyn A. Bruns
Patricia Carpenter Field
Marguerite Chandler Brewer
Ann Chidsey Moebius
Susan Cluett Stocker
Sheiler Collins Frank
Marion Crossman MacCallum
Sandra Davis Mather
Jane Durkee
Frances Everets Rosser
Mabel Fasti ggi Fiscella
Patricia Flett Lowe

x Amy Frye Thorn dike
Carole Gaysunas Dalrymple
Anna- Mae George Wogan
Thelma Greenberg Florin
Marlene Haake Schuler
Nancy Hedtler Ford
Shirley Herold Johnson
Joan Hildebrandt Estey
Norah Horsfield Mating
Nancy P. Horton

x Nancy Husted Koerner
Cor in da Johnson Deans
Elizabeth Lindsay Buhler
Janet McElgunn Flynn

x Mary McLeman Brown
Carol Meyer LaViale
Virginia Michel ini Parks
Sybil Moore Pinkham



18



Ruth Paetz Braun
Joan Pickett Morrow
Glenna Pofcher Bloom
Marjorie Price Johnson
Joan Rabbitt Downey
Sandra Reynolds Grant
Orelyn Rice Emerson
Margaret Robson Priddy
Carol Rofer Hofmann
Sara Rojas Casarella
Eleanor Sclare Mazur
Audrey Smith Ruggles
Harriet Solotist Grunberg
Nancy Swanson Horsfield
Janice Sweet Morsilli
Marilyn Taylor Ames
Joanna Ward
Barbara Watts Rubino

1955

Total contribution: $874.00

Chairmen

Ann Harris Hughes
Mary Sweenor Ruggieri
Sally Warner O'Such

Agents

Marlene Berman Lewis
Rhea Cooney Simonds
Elaine Montella Butler
Joy Stewart Rice
Marilyn Valter Maclay
Abby Alderman Kleinberg
Betty Boday Fox
Ann Bottjer O'Donnell
Judith Bowen Drews
JoAnne DiPietro Di Marco
Priscilla Fenton Abercrombie
Ethel Griffin Browning
Barbara Hammett Mills
Diana Hendley Cooper
Charleen Herrling Smith
Barbara Karasik Davidson
June McLaughlin Lombino
Carol Merwin Robinson
Stephanie Purcell Barton
Hazel Schoppy Callahan

Contributors

Joan Beeley Hopkins
Marlene Berman Lewis
Ruth Birch Bastis
Betty Boday Fox
Rhea Cooney Simonds
Carol Ann Cunningham
Carole Darsky Giller
JoAnne DiPietro Di Marco
Priscilla Fenton Abercrombie
Diane Flynn Passavant
Donna Gearhart Leo
Joan Geddes Grant
Jane Gray Milne
Susan Gray Lichtenstein
Ethel Griffin Browning
Patricia Gura Conroy

x Judith Gushue Blythe
Carolyn Hall Browning
Barbara Hammett Mills
Genevieve Harold
Marcia Harrington McCarthy
Ann Harris Hughes

x Judith Hartnett Clavin
Diana Hendley Cooper
Ann Heyman
Janet Holmes Murphy
Judith Hulsman Buffington
Barbara Karasik Davidson

x Jean Kellner Houston
Carol Kenneally Gardner
Sandra Lally Hovey
Judith Lanese Karazulas
Joanne Larsen Bibber
Patricia Lee Oswald
Marv Mack Gutsche
June McLaughlin Lombino
Carol Merwin Robinson
Joan Murano Swanson
Linda Nolin Ahern
Lucinda Nolin Johnson
L Marion Nutter Bredehoft
Beverley O'Brian Perry
Nancy Pierce Driscoll
Carol Phelps Pike
Cynthia Raymond Paalborg



Elizabeth J. Reynolds
Patricia Reynolds Fisher
Hazel Schoppy Callahan
Druscilla Sen Watson
Barbara Smith Lynch
Caroljean Somers Irrgang
Sandra Stone Myerow
Dorcas Styles Hodgkins
Gail Swanson Rees
Mary Sweenor Ruggieri
Angela Tabellario Mitchell
Susan Thomas Wiard
Mary Jane Tidman Bridges
Barbara Travis Hendrick
Marilyn Valter Maclay
Adrienne Vitali Stewart
Sally Warner O'Such
Mary Waterman Weaving
Mia Ysselstyn Broug

1956

Total contribution: $667.00

Chairmen

Sandra Shelton Fitch
Amy Shuttleworth Jensen

Agents

Nancy Ahlgren Tewes
Alicia Albright Leach
Mary Augur Wallace
Judith Berger Hurwitz
Joyce Bliss Doyle
Beverly Breed Hovey
Judy Caswell Allen
Joan Conley Eid
Helene Driscoll Kukola
Thelma Epstein Lapides
Carol Fitzpatrick Harrell
Patricia Gammons Dodgen
Barbara Gorman Trice
Ann Hastings Peterson
Ann Hekemian Krikorian
Sally Herman DeRosa
Terry Kilgore Mannix
Elizabeth Larrabee Martin
Carol LeCompte Cuthbert
Barbara Murdock Woods
Susan E. North
Janet Parmenter Ellinwood
Carolee Pedusey Virgilio
Carol Phalen Swiggett
Elaine Richardson Lefebvre
Donna Schmitt Gormley
Margaret Schwingel Kraft
Beverly Yaghjian Arabian

Contributors

Nancy Ahlgren Tewes
Alicia Albright Leach
Ann August Marcus
Sylvia Barnaby Hamilton
Judith Berger Hurwitz
Louise Bernson Neiterman
Janet Berry Auletta
Joan Bloch Hulihan
Beverly Breed Hovey
Marjorie Cavallo Olson
Sarah Churchill Downes
Joan Conley Eid
Eleanor Cranston Hileman
Patricia Dahlgard Schroeder
Hanna DenHartog Abrahams
Priscilla Driggs Bevin
Helene Driscoll Kukola
Janice Engstrom Barbato
Deborah Farnum Varney
Dorothy Fayan Hammond
Martha Forristall Smith
Gail Frank Wells
Diane Halliday White
Patricia Hayes Schoeller
Ann Hekemian Krikorian
Suzanne Kellner Canfield
Carol LeCompte Cuthbert
Judith Littlefield Clark
Patti Lockwood Blanchette
Patricia Luchka Butterworth
Kaye Mackler Aronson
Elaine Montgomery Farwell
Frances Nettleton Konsella
Susan E. North
x Patricia O'Shea
Sheila Paquette Ward
Janet Parmenter Ellinwood



Carol Phalen Swiggett
Joan Polidor Selander
Mary Porter Darroch
Sylvia Rafkin Hurwitz
Joan Raymond Healey
Barbara Richman Elliot
Lorraine E. Saunders
Carolyn Scherer Butler
Carolee Scribner Cain
Evelyn Shear Pinsof
Sandra Shelton Fitch
Amy Shuttleworth Jensen
Nancy Smith Marchese
Audrey Spawn Stockman
Phyllis Steckler Thomas
Patricia Strawbridge Mulhern
Katherine H. Taft
Suzanne Wadsworth Jonas
Bette Walsh Ollstein
Beverly Yaghjian Arabian
Ann Yetter Thomas

1957

Total contribution: $252.50

Contributors

Constance A. Austad
Mildred Berg Cunningham
Edith Berger Kaplan
Joan Bielski Krajewski
x Susan R. Blake
Annette Bogdan Ferris
Virginia L. Bruce
Eileen A. Conradi
Anne Day Smith
Marjorie Day Grosjean
Virginia Field Coburn
Barbara Flint Gerold
Norma Gamins Wise
Patricia Howe Bassett
Frances Howell Rodenhizer
Marcia James Carthaus
Louise Jorda Matarazzo
Caroline Killam Moller
Katherine Knowles Scully
Judith Komito Oster
Audrey MacAdam Lowe
Lucile Martel Huggins
Patricia McAuley Haines
Sally Payne Perley
Marilyn Sandberg Prolman
Barbara Tounge Giles
Nancy e VanDeusen Connor

1958

Total contribution: $409.00

Agents

Betty Anderson Fairchild
Constance Baker George
Audrey Biggerstaff
Jeanne Bradner Spackey
Susan Clary Delahunt
Ann Lou Dunkel
Mary Ann Fuller Young
Elizabeth Hambro Burnes
Marion Heinsohn Mitchell
Janet Hicks McCoy
Nancy Maloney Coyle
Carole Paolino Pliakas
Brenda Pioppi Balboni
Ann Reeves Schmid
Sandra Sheller Lewis
Kim Steen Odle
Bette Stubbe Carcano
Elaine Tracey McCarthy
Starr Tupper Shannon
Susan Van Horn VanArsdale
Judith Watson Lewis
Gail Winalski Burd
Constance Wolcott Mason

Contributors

Audrey H. Biggerstaff
Andrea Bischoff Houser
Linda Braslow Lefkowitz
Millicent Carlson O'Brien
Susan Clary Delahunt
Barbara Cummings Taylor
Laurie Ferrante Cannon
Mary Ann Fuller Young
Judith George Stephens
Susan Greenhut Kamras
Elizabeth Hambro Burnes



Janet Hicks McCoy
Brenda Hoi brook Kane
Marian HumeTibbetts
Francine Klein Madison
Mary Landini Doyle
Helen Lundberg Carter
Nancy Maloney Coyle
Janet McPherson Pretto
Judith Meehan Moore
Roxanne Miller Socolow
Margaret Moore Watts
Myra Packer
Portia Pantages
Carol Ann Perrotti
Brenda Pioppi Balboni
Joan Plaskon Tatigian
Ann Reeves Schmid
Helene Schwartz Perry
Gail Seibert Glover
Elaine Shan ken Fischer
Meade Simpson Fasciano
Marsha Singer Marshall
Kim Steen Odle
Starr Tupper Shannon
Susan Van Horn VanArsdale
Jean Wynott Delahunt

1959

Total contribution: $408.00
Chairmen

Joan Conradi McLaughlin
Nancy Rotman Duffy

Agents

Sally Bridger Bridges
Jean Britton Siano
Sally Brockway Crawford
Frances Corthouts Downey
Karen Daniels Dorney
Kathryn Eckert Bodner
Holly Engel Boyer
Nancy Gotz Conn
Marjorie Borromey Lippert
Jane Dwyer Carr
Suzanne Paige Cook
Claire Salamanis Lyons
Melisse Jenkins Bailey
Sandra Poole Adams
Janet Roy Procino
Mary-Ann Stackpole Johnson
Priscilla Wakeling Patton
Carolyn Wood Brox

Contributors

Sondra Allen

Judith Barnstead Francis

x" Nicole Barson Berardi
Sandra Barton Fairchild
Sandra Bender Oresman
Beverly Bigelow Young
Marjorie Borromey Lippert
Susan Bravman Uretsky
Sally Bridger Bridges
Barbara Case Lipke
Carole Cohen Wexler
Joan Conradi McLaughlin
Joanne Curtis Island
Eileen Dahl Lord
Elsa Finard Waxman
Nancy Gotz Conn
Carole Grieve Bilafer
Donna Grover Holland

x Patricia Hayes Bailey
Susan Hearne Southwick
Beverly Juby Cooper
Sandra Kenney Granese
Dorothy Knobel Somogyi
Joanne Kotsaftis McLaughlin
Brenda McLafferty Manchester
Patricia Monahan Szostak
Dorothy Mulherin Foy
Anna Natsis
Marcia Rideout Stevens
Nancy Rotman Duffy
Janet Roy Procino
Barbara Skolnick Blume
Carol Slocum O'Brien
Joan Sycle Norwitz
Anne Telfer Considine
Priscilla Williams Espenhain
Carolyn Wood Brox
Jane Yeaton Bates

1960

To tal con tribu tion : $465. 50



19



Chairmen

Audrey Bergesen Long

Linda Telfer

Linda Chiaramonte Mount

Agents

Maury Chenoweth Denniston
Oiane Frankel Shulkin
Marsha Frommer Crowley
Susan Gage Barros
Martha Goodwin
Lynda Green Scourtis
Valerie Rothman Cenit
Ellen Smith
Phyllis Stone Blotner
Claire Sullivan Scatterday
K. Louise Thomson Mitchell
Joan M. White
Susan York Stadtfeld
Ronna Zucker Uhrman
Lucinda Hodskins Lindgren
Muriel Kershaw Shaw
G wen da J. Love
Carol Mackay Beams
Mary K. McCartney
Carolyn Ramage Chalmers

Contributors

Bette Alderman Piatt
Elizabeth Backus Girard
Beverly Baer Fine
Charlotte H. Brown
Maury Chenoweth Denniston
Marcia Dodson Morley
Elizabeth Fager Frederick
Lynn Flusser Tull
Marsha Frommer Crowley
Paulette Goldberg Holliday
Minna Golden Levin
Joan Herrick Cauley

x Carol Israel Allen
Baila Issokson Janock
Muriel Kershaw Shaw
Karen Kirk Ross
Gwenda J. Love
Carrol McKay Stephens
Vivien Miller Spertner
Anita Orleck Webber
Valerie Rothman Cenit
Constance Siben Rudner
Ellen C. Smith
Suzanne Spangenberg Straley

x Barbara Supowitz Green berg
Linda Telfer
Susan VanDorn Pease
Abby Wells Grubic
Joyce Wheeler Gardner
Joan M. White



1961

Total contribution: $4 1 1.00

Chairmen

Joan Brodalski DuBois
Ann Davidson
Jeannette M. Zglenicki

Agents

Carolyn Bird Murray
Charlotte Clinton Clark
Alexandra Engelhardt Tomes
Mary George Poor
Natalie Granchelli Towle
Laura T. Jensen
Marilyn Melick Green
Jane Kendrigan Dzien
Maryellen King Hardy
Sheila Komito Levine
Carole Lamson Burpee
Mary C. Lucas
Phyllis Milano Coliano
Sandra Mueller Sandberg
Susan Natapow DeBlase
Virginia A. Orsi
Pauline Sarrazin Addison
Elizabeth Schwingel Sullivan
Nan Sparks Hunter
Eileen F. Stack
Nancy Thomas Dudek
Lillian A. Ward
Susan White Ashe
x Jeanne Wickenden Lake
Jane Wilson Pape



Contributors

x Susan Alderman McConchie
Brenda Alperin Summer
Georgia Beaumont Kettelle
Patricia Benedict Colyer
Carol Brooke Dreier
Diane Cassata Pi 1 1 man
Barbara Cole French
Ann Davidson
Jan DeMartin Linfoot
Susan Dennison Harmon
Margaret Dickson Roberts
Linda Fait York
Beverly French Keigwin
Mary George Poor
Mildred Gillis Pereira
Lela Graham Adams
Diane Hartnett Hawkes
Lynne Horner Martin
Elizabeth Howard Crosbie
Carol Howe Gorman
Laura Jensen
Patricia L. Kiefer
Maryellen King Hardy
Sheila Komito Levine
Carole Lamson Burpee
Concetta R. Luppino
Phyllis Milano Coliano
Elizabeth Miller Clark
Joan Moeller Thompson
Janet Murray McEwen
Susan Natapow DeBlase
Virginia A. Orsi
Rona Ruderman Goldstein
Daphne Russell Williams
Susan Shaw Abbott
Donna Skillings Kessler
Cynthia Smith
Ellen Smith Burton
Nan Sparks Hunter
Eileen F. Stack
Marguerite Stockman Tierney
Elizabeth Schwingel Sullivan
Donna Szarek Sullivan
Jane Wilson Pape
Virginia Wollinger Fisher



1962

Total contribution: $413.00

Chairmen

Betsy MacMillan Blackledge
Andrea Zaletta Giovanniello

Agents

Susan Brooks Weiner
Linda Burnett Davis
Constance Ferolito Murray
Judith Fontaine Guenet
Beryl Hamlen Morrisey
Barbara Jillson Keif
llona Koch Hollar
E. Gwen Lincoln Colley
Marcia A. Madden
Roberta McKinley Machalek
Virginia McKinnon Dernavich
Patricia McNulty Magnotta
Betsey Mercer Henderson
Doris Orben Campbell
Carla Perkell Slomin
Randi Shapiro Cohen
Linda Strecker Harmon
Francine Cohn Jaffe
Virginia E. Fletcher
Priscilla Lane Jarman
Nance Magill Karp
Carol Miller Pekrul
Jasmin Mueller Gentling
Karen Reade Hewes
Sally Remley Southmayd
Arlene Royko
Linda Shaghalian Penniman
Karen Smith Grover
Elaine Sproul Belham
Priscilla White Givan

Contributors

Linda Ann Bald
Miriam Bloom Chaiklin
Muriel Bloom Bruskin
Jeanne Boyd Austin
Anne Brookhart Cady
Bethany Brown Stevens
Patricia A. Buxton



Barbara Cagle Rojecki
Constance Ferolito Murray
Janet Fields Gielchinsky
Barbara Fitzgerald Edson
Virginia E. Fletcher
Allison Haff Burrows
Nancy Haines Kennedy
Beryl Hamlen Morrisey
Penelope R. Hills
Ingrid Jonason Burch
x Elizabeth Killam Silvert
llona Koch Hollar
Robin MacCloskey Agnew
Betsy MacMillan Blackledge
Marcia A. Madden
Karen Mandel Marschall
Virginia M. Martin
Patricia McNulty Magnotta
Carol Miller Glassman
Joan Stastavickas Curtin
Randi Shapiro Cohen
Ellen Signorelli Johnson
Karen Smith Grover
Nancy Sporborg Keck
Elaine Sproul Belham
Linda Strecker Harmon
Janice Toran Stucki
Ann-Perley Wingersky Ireland
Judith Wright Levins
Susan Young Boynton

1963

Total contribution: $165.00

Chairman
Linda Norris Taylor

Agents

Charlotte Brown Whitehead
Karen Crafts Rodgers
Carol Cummings Steinberger
Barbara J. Moulton
Bonnie Storer Ouellette
Marcia Wightman Sansoucy
Diana Wilson Shepard
Susan Woodruff Bieling

Contributors

Deborah Begg McKinney

Bonnie Burrell Burns

Jeanne Call Bennett

Sandra Damigella Nelson

Ruth Dunn Souza

Karen Fox Evans

Barbara Freer Urquhart

Norene M. Hansen

Nancy L. Harten

Sarah Hirst Zvonkovic

Joann Jacobson

Dean Knobel Lindsay
x Claire Lipton Katz

Betty Lutz Stahlbrodt

Loel Mercer Poor

Barbara J. Moulton

Linda Norris Taylor

Nancy Sparrow Billings

Sylvia Starr Reddy
x Amy S. Ullman

Sally Viault Rogers

Linda Welt Horowitz



1964

Total contribution: $372.00

Agents

Mary McAtee Barnes
Claire Monahan Knapp
Janet Ramsbotham Hurt
Linda N. Parmenter
Virginia A. Schmidt
Helene Smith Shippen
Patricia Washburn Mancivalano
Donna S. Whiteley

Contributors

Judith Adelson Wein
Joyce Arkwright Fliedner
Vivien Ash Hayden
Jane Boyden
Carol Bradley Sullivan
Barbara Buffinton Boerst
Susan Childs Merrick
Susan Coster Mai sin



Elizabeth R. Daigneau
Nancie Devaux Swift
Susan Gordon Savitz
Susan Granger
Deidre Hanley Palermino
Susan Humphreys Klein
Nancy J. Lonergan
Marcia A. MacTavish
Bonnie Milne Drewes
Claire Monahan Knapp
Sara-Jane Osborne
Antoinette Palmer Nathan
Jane Pearson Kurz
Patricia Perry Polidor
Patricia Pugliese Streibel
Janet Ramsbotham Hurt
Phyllis Rhyno Heslet
Lynn Rosenbush Davidov
Ann J. Stern
Robin Strauss Shapiro
Francia Vishno Blitt
x Carole H. Weinig
Donna S. Whiteley
Susan Yates
Edith P. Zietlow

1965
Total contribution: $471.00

Chairmen

Nancy Currier
Linda Foster Nixon
Marjorie Story Brown

Agents

Sally Beaven Garfall

Laurel Brown Bickell

Paula Burstein Bilow

Susan Calder LaMarine

Helen J. Cassam

Dorothy Hogdson Rea

Susan Layng Bogle

Cynthia Ames Rutan

Karen Beaton Porter

JoAnn Benoit Thomas

Susan B. Dan gel

Anne DeArment Naples

Deborah DeStaebler MacGowan

Danna D. Donnelly

Elizabeth Garfield Thompson

Elizabeth L. Gillette

Mary Ann Griffin Lally

Robin Paulding Chisholm

Beverlee Pembroke Hill

Janet Perkins Thompson

Gay A. Urban

Joan L. Vaidulas

Susan Warnick Krueger

Susan Williams Shan bar

Linda Wilson Bonfiglio

Judith A. Winters

Mary Sprague Kirk

Contributors

Susan S. Briggs
x Mary Clapp Searle

Marie Coven Kaplowitz

Doris Davis Ross

Anne DeArment Naples

Deborah DeStaebler MacGowan

Carolyn Erhardt

Laurie-Jean Finnerty Thompson

Wendy Gaillard Blaha

Elizabeth L. Gillette

Lee Gissler Andera

Ellyn Greenstein Greenbaum

Susanne Johnson Nicolazzo

Susan Layng Bogle
x Ann Lessner Chorches

Nancy G. Lincoln

Susan Lind Hennigar

Ann M. Mattioli
x C. Elloise Mayo Packer

Susan Meyer Datz

Mary-Jean Mueller Supanich

Janet W. Muir

Karen Pedersen

Virginia Pedrick Searle

Beverlee Pembroke Hill

Sibyl Ryan Piccone

Dorothy Searles Woods

Elizabeth J. Silliman

Mary Sprague Kirk

Elinor Stone Ross

Gay A. Urban



20



Joan L. Vaidulas
Linda A. Weiner
Lynn Wemple Cooley
Karen E. Wiley
Susan Williams Shanbar
Martha Wright Potter
Susan Yenkin Leffler

1966

Total contribution: $238.00

Chairmen

Susan Ellis McLaughlin
Linda L. Ferris
Gail Williamson

Agents

Alice Reeves
Nancy Reeves Peterson
Susan Ruby Pomer
Anne C. Smith
Susan Stuurman
Virginia Wolf
Nancy L. Andrews
Arlyn Baker Sadowski
Linda A. Beardslee
Margherita C. Guillaro
Marsha L. Howe
Mary Lloyd Zaragoza
Elinore Lowe
Nancy Olson Lamparelli
Susan Call is Terrio
Ann Canedy Parisien
Penny Colpitts Warren

Contributors

Joy Abercrombie Dooley
Linda A. Beardslee
Nancy B. Black
Karen Brown Ferris
Barbar Caron Mac Lean
Cynthia Cattanach Harding
Linda Cheney Burney
Penny Colpitts Warren
Nan Eisenstein Speller
Deborah Fineberg
Joanne J. Frankel
Valerie L. Girard
Margherita C. Guillaro
Constance L. Hill
Marsha L. Howe
Victoria M. Lalli



Patricia A. Lamarre
Sharon K. LeVan
Mildred A. Levy
Gail MacLean Cabral
Emily Manning Monbleau
Virginia L. Martin
Sandra J. Oakes
Alice E. Reeves
Nancy Reeves Peterson
Roberta Rogers Shore
x Paula Rutstein Melnick
Lois Sawyer Caulfield
Kathleen Shed Claflin
Donna Terwilliger Moor
Susan Wakeman Meier
Marjorie Wolozin

1967

Total contribution: $222.00

Contributors

Nancy J. Begg
Barbara Couglin Miff
Deborah Dunn Paddock
Lynn A. Farash
Pamela J. Fenhagen
Wendy E. Foster
Jacqueline Frost DiPerna
Judith A. Knutson
Barbara L. Kurtin
Susan Lillywhite Berkoski
Judith Locke Harrigan
Kathryn Morgan Lucey
Cynthia Nowak Cardellichio
M. Diane Olson
Susan P. Posner
Marilea Robbins
Carol A. Shapiro
x Jane Sherwin Greenslit
Avis K. Small
Susan L. Swanson
Susan C. Swienckowski
Dorothy E. Wilson
Kathleen M. Wright



1968

Total contribution: $293.00

Contributors

Mary-Lysbeth Casey Terkelson
Kathleen Dougherty Nelson



Gail Freeman Ruderman
Janet P. Gibson
Jacqueline Graham Farrell
Patricia Hallock Whele
Edith Hogsett
Carol A. Johnson
Frances Madigan Cramb
Ellen Margolis
Judith A. Milford
Roberta M. Munce
Stephanie A. Pendleton
Cynthia Rardin Crawford
LePage Robbins
Marlene Starvish Friary
Ann F. Sterner
Roberta J. Stott
Janice M. Taylor
Patricia A. Thayer
Elizabeth A. Wissman
Ruthanne Woods Thibodeau
Judith Yee

Woodland Park

and

High School

Total contribution: $35.00

Contributors

Tevis Huber Mellish
Jean E. Peace
Doris Wilson Lehners
Jeannette Woodruff Fischer

Life Members

Katharine M. Anthony
Bertha McNerny St. Amand

Club Gifts

Total contribution: $650.00

Buffalo

Chicago

Connecticut Valley

Fairfield County

Gold Coast - South Florida

New Hampshire

Philadelphia — South Jersey

Pittsburgh

Rhode Island

Matching Gifts
Total contribution: $1 135.00



Bank of New York

Continental Corporation Foundation

Daro, Inc.

Eighty Maiden Lane Foundation

Esso Education Foundation

General Foods Fund, Inc.

Gillette Company

John Hancock Insurance Company

IBM Corporation

Kidder Peabody Foundation

Krando Foundation

New England Mutual Life Insurance

Company
Northeast Utilities Service Company
Norton Company
Pennwalt Foundation
Riegel Textile Corporation

Foundation
Rockefeller Family & Associates
Tenneco Foundation Incorporated
Time Incorporated

Towers, Perrin, Forster & Crosby, Inc.
Travelers Insurance Company

Trustees
Faculty and Administration

Total contribution: $1 1 12.50

Trustees

Marguerite House Hamlin '19*
L Louise Tardivel Higgins '37*
L Helen B. Perry '24*

Rosalie Brightman Rosen '27*
L Helen M. Saunders '17*
L Julia Crafts Sheridan '10 (Deceased)
L Phyllis Rafferty Shoemaker '22*
L Toni Meritt Smith '23*

Wilder N. Smith

Dr. and Mrs. Blake Tewksbury

Richard A. Winslow

Faculty and Administration

Charles E. Barry
Ruth T. Brinton
Mrs. James L. Glynn
Elise L. Jewett
Muriel R. McClelland
Eleanor S. Perley
Dorothy E. Weston

*Alumna Trustee - contribution
included within class



The Western Massachusetts and Southern California Alumnae Clubs
directed this year's contributions directly to the Alumnae Building
Fund. California's treasurer remarked: "a little trickle now and then
may actually result in a big pool."



21



ALUMNAE DAUGHTERS ARRIVE




Among the twelve alumnae daughters and granddaughters m the class
of 1972 were the following new students as they arrived and were
greeted by Dr. and Mrs. Greene at a reception for freshmen and their
parents on opening day of the College: first, Pamela Ross whose
grandmother was Thelma Blossom '21 and Mr. and Mrs. Edward W.
Ross; below left, Victoria Ely with Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Ely
(Martha Stonebraker '45); and on the right, Margo Dickson and Mrs.
Charles B. Dickson (Paula Maue x-'41) meet Dr. Greene.



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22




CLASS NOTES



'10

Although none of us could attend
our 60th Reunion, we have had a spe-
cial reunion in the form of a Round
Robin letter. Of the twenty-seven
graduates of 1910, eight of us are
enjoying annual "visits" via the inter-
esting letters and pictures of children,
grandchildren and great-grandchil-
dren.

This year we failed to contact four
classmates — Cornelia Stone, Mary
Gallaher Catlin, Nell Carneal Drew
and Eleanor Laurens McCrady. Julia
terKuile Brown is not well and did
not join the Round Robin. On May
9th we lost another active member,
Julia Crafts Sheridan.

Marion Hale Bottomley

1. Jo Woodward Rand: Always a
loyal Lasellian. Jo is co-director of
our letter and keeps abreast of the
times at the College. In 1969 she was
a Lasell Medallion recipient. She has
three sons and one grandchild. Hob-
bies include, art, books, and antiques.

2. Mildred Snyder Grant: Lives in
New Orleans and until recently was
connected with the Thetas at New-
comb College. Mildred has six grand-
children.

3. Julia Hamilton Peters: Spends
the summer months in Great Falls,
Montana; winters at Coronado Beach,
California. She has a son, two daugh-
ters, eleven grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren. Julia and her
husband recently celebrated their
56th wedding anniversary.

4. Irma Levi Levy: A Sarasota, Flor-
ida resident. Her oldest grandson is
studying law and the younger is
teaching in a school for the mentally
retarded. A third grandson is a stu-
dent at the University of Florida; her
granddaughter attends high school.
Irma also has three grandsons in
Houston, Texas.

5. Mildred Goodall Fairbanks: Has
a lovely home in Miami Beach. Her
husband passed away a year ago,
and it has changed her life for they
were very keen about dancing and
golf. One time on a dance floor Mil-
dred was mistaken for Irene Castle.
Mildred has twelve grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren. Until re-
cently she has been an active volun-
teer at the Miami Heart Clinic.



6. Tot McLean Hunt: Busy and
happy in Dallas, Texas — swims, plays
bridge and travels. Had a great time
entertaining Mildred Snyder's and
Lucy Aldrich's grandsons. Last sum-
mer House and Garden Magazine
printed a feature story on the Texas
home of Tot's son.

7. Margherita Dike Haliberg: Now
lives in Laguna Hills, California. Both
her son and daughter live back East;
there are seven grandchildren. Mar-
gherita is a great traveler — her most
recent tour included Australia and
New Zealand. While in the Chicago
area, she was a faithful member of
the area Alumnae Club — sent pic-
tures of Helene Grashorn Dickson
'22, Julia Potter Schmidt '06, Mary-
Florine Thielens Peeples x-'06 and
Alice Wry Anthony '24.

8. Marion Hale Bottomley: As act-
ing Class Secretary, it has been a
great pleasure to keep the Class Let-
ter moving. I live with my daughter
Mary (Lasell '42) and keep busy doing
volunteer work at our medical center
patient's library. Last winter I spent
three months in Florida — away from
the "deep freeze" of Vermont. While
in Sarasota, I had a very happy ten
days with Julia Crafts Sheridan; we
both enjoyed frequent visits with Irma
Levi Levy. My older daughter lives in
Connecticut and has two children —
Brett, 15, a student at the Kent
School; and Melissa, 13, engrossed
in horses and riding.



'12

Ruth Marjorie Risser Blackwell's
letter is addressed to Alumnae Fund
Chairman Louise Tardivel Higgins:
"When this day dawned as perfectly
as June 11, 1912, I was carried back
to our commencement, and when the
postman brought your letter, I surely
felt you were helping me celebrate
our 58th Reunion. Thank you!

"Hope this year's Fund campaign
is a most successful one. Cheers for
all you are doing."

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Ruth Coulter Bierer, whose
husband, John M. Bierer, passed
away on July 8, 1970. Mary Ward
Lucci '69 is a granddaughter.




A live wire group —

Jane Parsons Westervelt '12

and three grandchildren



'15

Nell Woodward Collins comments
on the recent 1915 Class Round
Robin letter:

Congratulations are in order for
Madeline Farmer Ryder for being
chosen in June 1970 to receive the
Medallion given by the Alumnae As-
sociation for "adding distinction to
the name of Lasell." 1915 is very
proud of our classmate, who so richly
deserves this honor.

Irene Ball Sill is now in better
health than she has been for several
years. She has enjoyed many happy
times during the year with her daugh-
ters and their families.

Elizabeth Beach Bierer was invited
to go to Endland last spring with her
daughter and family — we hope she
went. She wrote that her granddaugh-
ter was considering Lasell — again,
we hope so!

Katharine Bingaman Heron and
sister Hannah (Bingaman '14) have
a new address: 1038 Park Avenue,
Plainfield, N.J. Both girls travel a
great deal and have visited several
Lasell friends, among whom are Car-
olyn Moore '14 and Dot Crane
Crowe '16.

One of Ada Patterson's three
nurses wrote a note for her to be
enclosed with the Class Letter. Our



23



"Go-Go Girl" is far from well; will
not be able to take further cruises.
Pat always wrote most vivid accounts
of her travels.

Our heartfelt sympathy goes to
Florence Evans Valpey in the loss of
her husband last June. Flos, how-
ever, has wonderful faith and is ad-
justing to her changed life magnifi-
cently.

Margrethe Bauman, the same old
Peg, is always very thoughtful of
others. We are glad her sister, Helen
Bauman Roblin '17, and husband
are Peg's near neighbors in Grayling,
Mich.

Myrtle Brix Spangler is very proud
of her three great-grandsons. She
keeps busy with Red Cross work;
helps with retarded children. "Billy"
misses the lovely garden of her for-
mer home, but "makes do" with the
pent-house garden.

Katherine Hoag Norgren and hus-
band keep well and busy in their
home; thoroughly enjoy their daugh-
ter and her family. "K" continues her
interest in music and various civic
affairs.

Ethel Murray Kuykendall finds that
her children and grandchildren help
her to forget the "physical" troubles.

Last winter Clara Paton Suhlke
had the pleasure of attending the
Southern Florida Lasell Club Lunch-
eon. She enjoyed the party in spite
of being the "oldest" member pres-
ent. But . . . Clara can never grow
old!

Vilette Peck Crawshaw is high
among us for "carrying on" when
the road gets rough. She has written
many lovely poems, including this
recent one enclosed in our Class Let-
ter:

A Lesson from the Sea



One day, I sat on the sandy shore
All I could hear was the breakers'

roar.
The waves rolled in with their caps of

white;
I was fascinated by the awesome
sight!

Sometimes my mind is turbulent

too
And unruly thoughts come

rushing through
But I know that the ocean will
again be calm



And I believe God will keep me
from harm.
So a lesson is learned from the

mighty sea
And it can bring peace to you
and to me.

Ida Beane Rice has had a hard
fight getting back to normal after
being felled by polio two years ago.
We are delighted that through her
faith in God and by the encourage-
ment of her own family and by her
unwavering determination, she is get-
ting back. She regretted so much
the fact that this year she could
not help with her favorite project,
The Halfway House for Unfortunate
Women.

Nell Woodward Collins is happy
to report that her sister, Jo Wood-
ward Rand '10, is recovering from
last winter's serious fall and is be-
ginning to walk without support. Jean
Woodward Nelson '22 has a new ad-
dress: Apt. 2-B, 665 South Alton Way,
Denver, Colo. All three sisters send
best wishes to Lasell friends.



'16

Wilda Berkey Cartland has moved
to Orlando, Fla. — nearby daughter
Joy Cartland Fowler x-'45.



'17

Carita Palmer Moffett sends word
of her recent marriage and new ad-
dress. She and Mr. Everett L. Clinard
were married on May 9, 1970 at the
home of Carita's daughter, Eloise
Moffett Harper '43, in Indianapolis.
The Clinards' now live at 16 West
Harrison Avenue, Charleston, Illinois
61920.

Grey skies, chill rain, and a strong
East wind failed to dampen the pic-
nic spirit at Mid Strain Nutter's annual
Pocasset party on August 11. Guests
arrived in time for morning coffee,
much chatter, indoor picnic lunch-
eon and more chatter. Attending were
Cape neighbors Ruth Irwin Rix and
Theodora A. Tower (Phys. Ed. Dept.
'61-'68) and Lasellites Helen Saun-
ders '17, Jess Shepherd Brennan
'17, Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55,



Marion Griffin Wolcott '16, Beulah
Coward Boardman '18, Mabel Stra-
ker Kimball '16, Freda Griffin Leining
'20, Mercie Nichols '19, Ethel Ram-
age Lougee '19, Dorothy Crane Crowe
'16, Dorothy Meeker Pearce '30, Dor-
othy Mosher Stone '42, Rosalie
Brightman Rosen '27, Barbara Cole
French '61, Suzanne Clark '55, Ruth
Lindquist Brinton and "Miss Mac"
McClelland. Generous contributions
provided a substantial addition to the
Alumnae Building Fund.

'21

Doris Brown Bergin and her hus-
band enjoyed a spring motor trip from
California to Florida. "Stopping to say
'hello' to our many friends we hadn't
seen for years. In Naples, Florida,
we had a delightful evening with Kay
Rice Broock '20 and her husband.
We flew to Panama — then on to San
Jose, Costa Rica, where Ana Clark
Keith '22 and her husband met us at
the airport.

Recently we spent a delightful aft-
ernoon with Thelma Blossom Ross
and her husband. They have a lovely
Spanish type house here in Santa
Barbara.




Doris Brown Bergin '21 and

Ana Clark Keith '22

San Jose, Costa Rica — Spring '70



24



In August we will be in Michigan
and plan to see my roommate Mabel
Vernon Eidner from Ft. Wayne, Indi-
ana. We will also see Ruth Rawlings
Mottin Flint.

Our plans for June 1971 — to at-
tend my 50th Reunion! Thelma and
her husband are also making the
same plans."



'23

Jeannette Merrick Moss writes to
Toni Meritt Smith: "Liz (Buettner Lang
and I enjoyed a delightful cruise to-
gether last winter on the North Ger-
man Lloyd Line. On our 'free' day
at St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands,
we met Caroline Smith Goodwin '35;
it was most interesting how we dis-
covered we were all Lasell alumnae.
Caroline's husband was fascinated
with the chit-chat, and insisted that
he take a picture which might be of
interest for the Leaves."



'24

Weddings:

Maude A. Wilcox and Edgar J.

Hanley on June 13, 1970 in

Westbrook, Conn.
To Helen Perry came this word
from Eleanor Parsons Macurda: "You
certainly have retained fine class
spirit — after all these years — to
write personal notes to class mem-
bers. My husband retired as a vice-
president of the First National City
Bank on Fifth Avenue five years ago.
He had had a heart attack in 1954,
recovered very well but six years ago
we decided to give up the 'Rat Race.'
We moved to La Mesa and are en-
joying California living.

"Our eldest son received his Ph.D.
from the University of Wisconsin and
is now an Assistant Professor of ge-
ology at the University of Michigan.
Our second son holds two degrees
from Cal Tech — one in engineering
and one in physics. Our daughter
went to Japan as an exchange stu-
dent during her junior year of col-
lege. After graduating she attended
Stanford University where she ma-
jored in Asian Studies. Stanford sent
her to Japan for a year; she returned



to work on her Master of Arts Degree,
which she was awarded this spring.
She was one of 60 out of over 300
to be chosen as a guide at the U.S.
Pavilion at Expo '70 in Osaka.

"My husband and I love to travel
— have had trips to the South Seas
by ship with stopovers in New Zea-
land and Austraiic. Our daughter met
us in Vienna on her way home from
Japan; we bought a VW and toured
Europe and the British Isles, with
time out for a 21-day tour of the
Scandinavian countries. The year be-
fore last my husband and I enjoyed
a cruise of the Greek Islands, the
land tour of Greece, rented a car in
Italy to see the Lakes; then joined a
tour for three weeks in Spain and
Portugal. Last fall we drove to Maine
— came home via the Smokies.

"It was a shock to be reminded
that our 50th Reunion is not too far
away!"



'25

New officers for the Class of 1925
are: Secretary: Helen Wahlquist, Mrs.
Henry R. Shenning, Route 3, Box
968, Fort Myers, Florida 33901 and
Agent: Gertrude Kendall, Mrs. Henry
G. Lund, 81 Eunice Avenue, Worces-
ter, Mass. 01606.

The Class extends sincere sympa-
thy to Barbara Cushing Jenkins
whose husband passed away very
suddenly on August 2, 1970.



'26

In mid-July Margaret "Andy" An-
derson Gage wrote from Sacra-
mento: "Upon our return from a
five-week trip to the Pacific North-
west, including an eight-day cruise
to the Inside Passage of Alaska on
the Norwegian Meteor, I found the
recent issue of the Leaves. For the
third or fourth consecutive time there
were no personal items for the Class
of 1926. Could be we are all dead —
or half so — and just don't know it!

"However, a few of us on the West
Coast have been together. Last Oc-
tober Dot Hale Brown came for a
visit from Fayetteville, N.Y.; in April
Minerva Damon Ludewig '27 came




Liz Buettner Lang '23, Carolyn Smith
Goodwin '35, Jeanette Merrick Moss
'23— St. Thomas, V.I.

over from San Francisco for the
weekend. Later this summer my first-
year Lasell roommate, Frances Vail
Pollack x-'26, will come from south-
ern California to spend a week.

"I return to my 14th year of teach-
ing kindergarten in September. Per-
haps this note will bring forth a re-
sponse from other classmates. Do
hope so — I still cherish fond memo-
ries of my two happy years at Lasell."



'30

In April Doris Hatch Rand was
awarded first prize in the Town Show
sponsored by the Marblehead Arts
Association. Doris has studied at the
Boston University Art School; was a
pupil of Don Stone and Joseph San-
toro. In the years 1968 and 1969 she
had the distinction of winning First
Prize at the Marblehead Festival of
Arts. She is currently teaching a wa-
ter color class for the Marblehead
Arts Association.



'31

Mary O'Connell wasn't exactly
given $1 million on Sunday, January



25




Louise "Tap" Tardive! Higgins '37 and

Elizabeth "Babe" Beamer Dahlberg '37

March 1970



(Administrator Lindley is the hus-
band of Priscilla Chappie '40, and to
quote Mary — "they are two of my
most favorite people." Ed.)



'32

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Janet Kennedy Chapman
x-'32, whose husband, Clark Chap-
man, Jr., passed away on May 27,
1970. He was associated with his
father in the Portland law firm of
Chapman, Chapman and Gardner and
was vice president of the Cumber-
land County Bar Association.

Nancy Fowler Marshall writes from
Durham, N.C.: "In September Randy,
Jr. begins study for his Ph.D. in Edu-
cation at Chapel Hill. Florence, our
daughter (19), has been attending
St. Andrew's in Laurinburg — has
changed her idea of teaching as a
profession and is now concentrating
on the secretarial field. Regards to
all Lasell friends."



'36

Doris Shipman Edge is the instruc-
tor for a Livingston (N.J.) Student
Development Program course titled
"Merry Masques." This course
teaches creative dramatics for the
older child. Doris attended the Ellen
Cole Felter School of Drama in New
York City for three years. Her ex-
perience includes former membership
in the East Orange, Bloomfield and
Livingston Little Theater. She has
served as vice-president of the New
Jersey Theater League and at pres-
ent serves as drama chairman for
the Women's Club of Livingston.

Doris has directed productions for
the YMCA, Scouts, CYO, and chil-
dren's theater groups throughout the
state. For the past five years she has
been associated with Jefferson Lake
Day Camp in Stanhope, New Jersey,
where she teaches speech and act-
ing techniques to over 500 students
a season and produces a full-scale
musical comedy each summer.



4, 1970, but she came as close to it
as most people ever will. Mary, chief
dietitian at the Somerset Hospital
(Somerville, N.J.) for the past 24
years, had a portion of the hospital's
new million-dollar wing dedicated in
her honor.

The section of the hospital that
now officially "belongs" to Mary — as
it has unofficially since 1946 — is the
spacious new dietary department.
Expansion and modernization of the
department, which includes a new
employee cafeteria is the first major
renovation to be made to that area
of the hospital since 1944 when it
was a 170-bed facility. Today the
hospital has 320 beds and the dietary
department has 80 employees, com-
pared to the 15 Miss O'Connell super-
vised when she came to Somerset to
take over the job of feeding the hos-
pital's patients and employees.

Hospital Administrator Nelson O.
Lindley knew that had Mary been
aware of what was afoot she would
not have been present to hear the
tribute to her long service to the hos-
pital and to receive the bouquet of
long-stemmed red roses as a symbol
of the event.



'33

For years, the dynamic oils and
watercolors of Jane Spear have de-
lighted a select group of close friends,
including both fellow artists and
critics.

A most successful show was held
on Saturday and Sunday, September
20-21, 1969 at Jane's Chicago apart-
ment.



'34

This quick June note from Carol
Morehouse Jones: "Daughter Kathy,
Lasell '67, was graduated last week
from Cornell School of Nursing in
New York City. We are very proud
and happy parents. Kathy is working
at the Easton (Penna.) Hospital for
two months; then she and three
friends will take a motor trip out
West, camping along the way. In Oc-
tober she will begin her duties at
New York Hospital, a part of the Cor-
nell complex in the City."



'38

Weddings:

Nancy Carruthers Bicknell and
Comdr. Edward A. Taber, Jr.
USN (Ret.) on July 11, 1970 at
Prouts Neck, Maine



'40

Catharine Buckley Congdon has
been appointed to the professional
staff in the Norwich (Conn.) office of
Catholic Charities. Catharine, a grad-
uate of Colby College, attended the
Boston College School of Social Work
and holds a master's degree in psy-
chiatric social work.

Jane Hutchison Wulfing sent re-
grets for her 30th Reunion and added:
"Sorry I can't make it but Gretchen
will be home from the University of
Denver in early June. Christine, La-
sell x-'67, now married, lives in
Greenfield Center, N.Y. John, Jr. and
wife are in Carthage, III. I do some
volunteer hospital work, but life as a
widow leaves much to be desired.
Have shed the headaches of a house



26



— am enjoying a town-house apart-
ment at 1340 Manorlac Drive, St.
Louis, Mo.

Affectionate greetings to 1940 Re-
unioners!"



'41

Weddings:

Eleanor Pfaff and James R.

Daly on March 21, 1970 in

Jupiter, Fla.
Virginia Dostal Easterbrooks sends
"Greetings from Plymouth, England"
and adds: "My husband and I are
touring England with friends. Can't
understand why our forefathers left
here!"

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Brown
(Betty McGrath) have been named
chairmen of Milwaukee's 1971 Sym-
phony Ball to be held on January 23
at the Performing Arts Center.



'42

On Saturday, June 6, 1970, at the
Auburndale Church of the Messiah,
Janet Lynne Crosby became the
bride of Rodney Richard Stewart.
Barbara Crosby was maid of honor
for her sister; the bride's parents are
Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Crosby
(Ruth Turner).

Gini Robinson Nast tells us that
Dot Higson White's daughter, Mar-
tha, and her husband, Frank, have
graduated from College; are happily
settled in Pompano Beach, Fla. Dot's
son, Ozzie, a student at Brown Uni-
versity, has had a unique summer
occupation — working at a yacht club
on France's Normandy coast.

Marcia Corey Hanson's daughter,
Lorna, was graduated from Lasell in
June 1970 and plans to major in
Math at the University of Miami.

Barbara Collester Moore forwards
her new address: Lake Boulevard,
Whispering Pines, N.C. 28327. "We
have semi-retired to North Carolina
where we are really enjoying life
among the pines and lakes in this
beautiful state. With our airplane, we
feel we're central on the east coast
— four and a half hours to Florida,
four and a half hours to Massachu-
setts."



'43

Weddings:

Dorothy Bentley Grant and Mr.
Percy S. Nichols on June 20,
1969.

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Gillerlain
(Ann Preuss) announce the marriage
of her daughter, Deborah Ann Olson,
to Gerald A. Gagliardi on Saturday,
September 5, 1970 in New Canaan,
Conn. Deborah is completing her
senior year at the Syracuse Univer-
sity School of Art.



'44

Barbara Goodwin Flint has served
as this year's President of the Mel-
rose (Mass.) Phi Theta Xi Sorority.
For over twenty-one years, the Sor-
ority has presented an annual sum-
mer Country Fair and Carnival as a
benefit for the Melrose-Wakefield
Hospital.

'47

Paintings by Dorothy Papani Pal-
mer will be shown during the month
of September at Bare Cove Gallery,
Hingham, Mass.



'48

Marjorie Weinman Sharmat x-'48
is the author of "Gladys Told Me To
Meet Her Here," published by Har-
per's Junior Books Department in
May 1970.

'49

From Jane Wadhams Hazen: "Here
is a news item for the Class of 1949!
I ran into Barbara Davis Canterbury
at the Motor Vehicles Department
where we both were accompanying
our 16-year-old daughters as they
faced the rigorous driving tests of
the State of Connecticut. (Both girls
passed!) Barbara is working part-
time as a lecturer for a paint com-
pany — giving tips on color, interior
decoration, etc. She has recently re-
turned from New York where her
husband accompanied her on her



business trip! She looks great and is
as sweet as always.

Our oldest daughter, Elizabeth, will
be a freshman math major at Russell
Sage College this fall."

Eva Laitinen Stromski writes: "Took
a year off from teaching and have
earned a Master of Education degree
from Boston University. It took 21
years after those glorious Lasell days
(I must be a slow learner!) but re-
quirements are now completed.

Good luck on the pool project."

'51

Weddings:

Ann Van der Veer Lander and
Willis Craig Bradley on August
8, 1970.
Evelyn Claire Quinzani Kerins re-
quested a transcript of her Lasell rec-
ord to be sent to Citrus College,
Azusa, Calif. She adds: "We have
been living in Glendora at 1341 Peb-
ble Springs Lane for over two years
and love it. Our son, Don, Jr., enters
the first year of high school in Sep-
tember; Kathy is a darling three-
year-old angel. Sister, Catherine
(Quinzani '50), has recently com-
pleted requirements for a degree at
Framingham (Mass.) State and is
most enthusiastic about her new
teaching career. Would love to hear
from Lasell friends."




Susan Lee Doe
(Bonnie Reis '51)



27



'52

Joan Stillwell Smith's recent let-
ter is dated Scottsdale, Arizona, July
2, 1970: "Have appeared in some
ten-odd commercials on what is re-
ferred to as 'regional' meaning South-
west region of the United States. One
national appeared three years ago
for Lipton Tea. One motion picture
is to my credit for M.G.M. — 'Zabriskie
Point'; and presently I am being con-
sidered for Stanley Kramer's new
movie 'Bless the Beasts and Chil-
dren.' High Chapparral called last
week for me to interview for an epi-
sode, but I was in Mexico with the
family. Next time, maybe! Under con-
sideration also for new movie to be
filmed here with Ernest Borgnine.

Enclosed you will find a sample
of an ad in Time, March 9 issue. I
have also appeared in 52 national
newspapers as well as trade maga-

Joan Stillwell Smith '52 as she ap-
peared in U.S. News & World Report
for the Arizona Bank, and for Hayden
Flour Mills — an ad which was run
in various newspapers and trade
magazines during '69 and '70.




zines. I've made many industrial
movies including Oldsmobile and
most recently, Volkswagen. Film strip
work is also included in my schedule.
To add to the excitement, I am the
Executive Secretary of the Arizona
Committee of Screen Actors Guild.
In fact, had luncheon yesterday with
Governor Jack Williams, Dick Van
Dyke and Amanda Blake. Dick Van
Dyke announced his new series at
the luncheon.

My children, Kathy (17), Shelly
(15), Brad (14), and Jacque (12), all
model for television or newspaper
and magazine ads. They also ap-
peared in a newly released Para-
mount movie.
With fond memories of Lasell."
Marilyn Madden Morgan has been
appointed to the position of elemen-
tary school teacher by the Wayne
(Me.) School Committee. Marilyn's
teaching experience includes posi-
tions in Alaska and Maryland as well
as in Millinocket, Maine. She, her
husband and two children, are living
in Kents Hill.




G Kissir( Qakes

6ake fresh withfFamily a Kjtchen G FIoor.

The white, light, made in Arizona flour.

Eipect a kiss when you take the lime to bake it yourself. Beautiful baking
is easy when you use Hayden Family Kitchen or Rose Flour Cakes are
whiter, biscuits are lighter . , , everything lastes better! Vou know it's
fresher, because it's made in Arizona in Arizona's own Hour mill and
cli ma tized- blended for Arizona baking.
// you want to show someone you care, bake him his
favorite from Family Kitchen or Rose Flour And stand
by. You're likely to get kissed.



HAM >I 3N Flour Milts




'53

Born: to Beverly Thornton Hallowell,
fourth daughter, Hope, on May
7, 1970.

Barbara VanDine Robinson has
been appointed group actuarial ana-
lyst in pre sale underwriting at New
England Mutual Life Insurance Com-
pany. Barbara joined the firm's ac-
tuarial department in 1962.

Sixteen-year-old Robert Kalogeros
is probably the only youth in Connec-
ticut who cooked pizza pies on top
of the New Mexico Rockies this sum-
mer. He was one of some 70 Boy
Scouts hand picked by Scout Coun-
cils throughout the nation to attend
a special "Kit Carson Men" two-week
training course at the national Boy
Scout Training Camp in Philmont,
Cimarron, N.M.

Bob, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Kalogeros (Molly McBride), loves to
cook. He found the trail food — mostly
dehydrated concoctions carried in
Scout packs — a real challenge. So
he and another friend began experi-
menting and came up with the pizza
— setting the stage for several pizza
parties on the mountain top during
the exhausting but exciting two-week
hike. Bob also may have the solution
to weight problems, his mother noted.
Pizza parties didn't hurt his waistline
a bit — he lost 15 pounds in the two-
weeks period — and all he had to do
was hike 100 miles.




fc* ~P U K&U& £**l IS??



THE REALLY FRESH FLOUR MILLED IN ARIZONA FOR ARIZONA GOOD COOKS



Eric Arthur Sommers
(Joan Schur '53)



28



'54

Born: To Mary McLeman Brown, a
second son, Mark Bennett, on
January 27, 1970.

Connie Quebec has recently been
appointed trust officer at Crocker-
Citizens National Bank in San Fran-
cisco.

In July it was announced that
Terry Sullivan had been appointed
manager of Peck & Peck's Belmont
(Mass.) Center shop. Terry has been
serving as assistant manager at the
Burlington Mall branch.

'55

Mia Ysselstyn Broug's note: "is to
let you know our change of address.
My husband has been transferred
by Shell from the Hague, Nether-
lands to London, England. Our new
home address is Croiscrag, Sandy
Lane, Cobham, Surrey, England."

From Maxine Seidel Lindemuth:
"Like — very much — the new format
of the Leaves. Am especially inter-
ested for I am the editor of the Mon-
mouth County Junior League News-
sheet. Am also doing Admissions
and work in the Thrift Shop — so you
can see I am kept busy. Plan to see
Janet Holmes Murphy at the annual
luncheon meeting of the English
Speaking Union; look forward to hav-
ing the Wiards (Sue Thomas) for din-
ner in the early fall. We have had a
wonderful summer here at home on
the Jersey shore — see Carol Dovey
Evarts quite frequently — she lives in
Fair Haven too. Jamie, 7, is in second
grade, and Kimberly, 3, is home with
me — and I love it! Jim is now with
Hess Oil and Chemical in Wood-
bridge."

'56

Engagements:

Barbara Foster to Bernard F.
Wickwire

'57

Weddings:

Patricia Dodge Stewart and Dr.
Gerald R. Guine in July in
Maiden, Mass.



'59

Born: To Nancy Gotz Cohn, a daugh-
ter, Lisa Caryn, on December
22, 1969.

To Sandra Kenney Granese, a
daughter, Elizabeth Mary, on
July 4, 1970.
Carole Cohen Wexler writes from
38 Locust Avenue, New Rochelle,
N.Y.: "Retired from Frederick Atkins,
Inc. in New York City — large mer-
chandising and market research com-
pany, where I was the junior sports-
wear buyer for several years — repre-
senting 50 stores all over the country.
"Got very involved tutoring cul-
turally deprived children and working
for Air Pollution Control. My husband
is Director of Pricing for the N.B.C.-
T.V. network. We are kept very busy!"

'60

Weddings:

Susan S. Elsbree and Robert
Warren on July 18, 1970 in
Warwick, R.I.

Born: To Susan Gage Barros, a third
son, Michael Gage, on August
7, 1970.
Marsha Frommer Crowley now
lives at 4104 Woodrow Lane, Bowie,
Md. 20715. John Jay was born Au-
gust 27, 1965; sister, Elizabeth Ann,
November 11, 1968.

'61

Very good news from Jane Par-
sons Dolbier: "We now have three
boys. Andrew Hobart was born Feb-
ruary 12, 1970.

Betsy Schwingel Sullivan stopped
by with her four children and dog on
their way to Nebraska — saw Lynn
Kiefer Abell in May. We plan to at-
tend 1971 Reunion.

We were in Northampton for two
weeks in July visiting my brother —
played a lot of golf. After being in
Ohio for three years, I had forgotten
how pretty Massachusetts is. Hope
to see you all in June!"

'63

Engagements:

Gail A. Regan to Paul Bickford
Martin



Constance Murphy Treen has been
selected by Outstanding Young Wo-
men of America for 1970 and her
biography will appear in the annual
compilation, Outstanding Young
Women of America. Now in its sixth
year, the Outstanding Young Women
of America program was conceived
by the leaders of the nation's major
women's organizations. It recognizes
those young women who contribute
to the betterment of their communi-
ties, professions, and country.

Connie was graduated from Lesley
College in 1966, and in addition to
teaching in the Norwood (Mass.)
school system and doing tutorial
work, she has worked with handi-
capped and retarded children as a
volunteer. She has worked at the
Joseph P. Kennedy Memorial Hospi-
tal and the Falmouth Hospital on
Cape Cod. She resides at 784 Pike
Avenue, Attleboro, with her husband
and two-year-old daughter.



'64

Engagements:

Jane E. Leonard to George W.

Wilcox

Linda Parmenter to Capt.

Robert E. Goulding, U.S.A.

Gail Stapleford to Christopher

C. Buck

Weddings:

Cheryl M. Campbell and

Charles H. Cremens on June

28, 1970 in Newton Centre,

Mass.

Virginia A. Dwyer and James J.

Clifford on August 29, 1970 in

Dover, Mass.

Dorothy A. Minzner and John

M. Freeman on August 22,

1970 in Andover, Mass.

Born: To Judith Adelson Wein, sec-
ond child, first daughter, Marcy
Lynne, on May 21, 1970.



'65

Engagements:

Margaret Jacobs to Murray

Kleimon

Janet S. Sherlock to John J.

Parks, Jr.



29



Weddings:

Nancy K. Burrough and David
A. Barry on June 6, 1970 in
Falmouth, Mass.
Elizabeth A. Garfield and
James R. Thompson on May
28, 1970 in Rockville, Md.
Meredith L. Gowdy and Harry
P. Meislahn on May 3, 1970 in
Albany, N.Y.

Margaret E. Jacobs and Mur-
ray Kleimon on July 12, 1970
Hamden, Conn.

Catherine H. Sanford and
Kenneth J. Nurmi on May 16,
1970 in Coventry, R.I.
Janet S. Sherlock and John L.
Parks on September 5, 1970 in
Seattle, Wash.

Born: To Cynthia Ames Rutan, a
daughter, Jennifer Lee, on May
6, 1970.





Mrs. Daniel J. Young Jennifer Conners '66
July 11, 1970



To Sally Beaven Garfall, a son,
Robert Olisse, on May 28, 1970.
To Carol Bruins DeStefano, a
son, Mark Thomas, on Decem-
ber 13, 1969.

To Mary Elizabeth Clapp
Searle, a daughter, Jo-anne
Dorothy, on May 2, 1970.
To Sally Cote Tirone, a son,
Gregory, on April 18, 1970.
To Laurie Finnerty Thompson,
a son, Gregory John, on
September 22, 1969.
To Jean Hill Johnson, a son,
Matthew, on May 21, 1970.
To Eleanor Lamson Brewster, a
daughter, Karen, on May 21,
1969.

To Karen Langley Hansler, a
daughter, Dannielle Ann, on
June 22, 1969.

To Marjorie Story Brown, a
son, Robert, on February 25,
1970.
Karen Kalish is now living in Ar-
lington, Virginia (1600 South Joyce
Street); is teaching first grade at Sid-
well Friends School in Washington.
"Have just returned from a wonderful
summer in Europe and Israel. I keep
in touch with Linda Block Reitzes,
Liz Garfield Thompson and Marie
Coven Kaplowitz."

Elizabeth Garfield Thompson writes
from One Washington Circle, Wash-
ington, D.C.: "At the present time I
am working for my husband, James
R. Thompson, who is vice president
of McBer and Company, an educa-
tional, research and consulting firm."



'66

Engagements:

Nancy Naylor to Donn T.

Withers

Laurie C. Saltz to Gary S.

Cooper

Weddings:

Leslie A. Berger and Melvin
M. Frankel on August 16, 1970
in Newton, Mass.
Carol Bettman and John R.
Hebbe on February 2, 1970
Robin N. Bleckwehl and Anatol
I. Popovich on July 11, 1970 in
So. Deerfield, Mass.
Judith A. Clark and Robert W.



Lecklider, USAF in July 1970

in Falmouth, Mass.

Jennifer Conners and Daniel J.

Young on July 11, 1970 in

Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Joy A. Fournier and Gregory L.

Pando on July 25, 1970 in

Canton, Mass.

Suzanne N. Golfe and Michael

A. Rosenberg on May 16, 1970
in Rochester, N.Y.

Sally J. Luther and Richard S.

Emory on June 27, 1970 in

Chatham, N.J.

Polly D. Merrick and Edward

E. Shumaker, 3rd in August

1970 in Holyoke, Mass.

Susan A. Neal '66 and Richard

B. Wheeler on June 26, 1970 in
Pasadena, Calif.

Janet Rohrbach and Joseph A.

Wuersch, Jr. on May 16, 1970

in Lancaster, Penna.

Linda L. Smith and Joel H.

Cohen on June 21, 1970 in

Bloomfield, Conn.

Nancy P. Tallman and David

E. Torgler on June 28, 1970

in Wilmington, Dela.

Born: To Eileen Allen Gromko, first
child, a daughter, Susan Lynn,
on January 13, 1970.
To Marnee Bliss Roberts, first
child, a daughter, Kimberly
McKee, on September 13,
1969.

To Susan Caldwell Hamlin
x-'66, a son, Clay Winston
Hamlin IV, on April 4, 1970.

Anna Maria Tambureno has joined
the staff at Yolanda's Boutique in
Belmont (Mass.). Anna will be sketch-
ing the latest fashions and hair de-
signs at the shop.

Anne Goodale Mack reports a new
address: Davis Street, Lee, Mass. She
and husband, Arthur, proudly an-
nounce the arrival of their first child,
a son, David Michael, on February
18, 1970.



'67

Engagements:

Kathryn A. Jones to Diederik

Jan van Renesse

Bonnie A. Kamerdiner to

Richard W. Schalle



30



Patricia J. Lee to Robert P.

Martin

Mary E. Wilkinson to Frank

Haran, Jr.

Weddings:

Elspeth M. Anderson and
Steven R. Blauvelt on May 16,
1970 in Greenfield, Mass.
Virginia C. Beecher and Harley
L. Parker, Jr. on August 15,
1970 in Colebrook, N.H.
Lelah A. Billington and Walter
P. Faria on August 22, 1970 in
So. Dartmouth, Mass.
Daphne Cole and Daniel W.
Keeler, Jr. on July 13, 1970 in
Hingham, Mass.
Lynne Davis and Peter E.
Fallon on June 13, 1970 in
Quincy, Mass.

Carol Dorfman and Steven A.
Gould on June 21, 1970 in
Worcester, Mass.
Jacqueline L. Frost and Ronald
J. DiPerna on June 20, 1970 in
N.Y. City, N.Y.

Donna J. Garrow and Peter
Johnson on April 25, 1970 in
West Newton, Mass.
Connie-Lee Hammond and F.
Woodman Jones on August 29,
1970 in Fryeburg, Maine
Carol S. Liska and Paul R.
Keating on June 13, 1970 in
Natick, Mass.

Catherine A. McGrath and
John F. Hersey on April 25,
1970 in Amherst, N.H.
Nancy J. Moorefield and Ed-
ward L. Shead on June 13,
1970 in West Boylston, Mass.
Pamela B. Robie and Forest A.
LaValley on June 27, 1970 in
Hingham, Mass.

Deborah A. Shomphe and Peter
G. Perakos, 2nd. in July 1970
in Nashua, N.H.

Joanne Smith and Eugene
Mallove on August 30, 1970 in
Newton, Mass.

Patricia A. Thatcher and John
R. Woodford on July 11, 1970
in So. Yarmouth, Mass.
Ilene D. Turk and Charles H.
Zimmerman on August 29, 1970
in Woodbridge, Conn.
Judith Vidmark and David Van
Wyck Nielson in May 1970 in
Fairfield, Conn.




Michael David North
(Ann Hudson '67)

Ellen Wagner and Capt. Joseph
M. Brunjes on June 23, 1970
in Topeka, Kansas
Janice J. Whitehead and
Robert E. Mosher on July 25,
1970 in Needham, Mass.
Ruth L. Wilson and Dr. Clyde
A. Wright on June 6, 1970 in
Grafton, Mass.

Siri Hanner received her bachelor
of arts degree from Northeastern Uni-
versity, Boston, in June. She will
attain teacher certification at Suffolk
University, Boston, this summer and
will teach this fall in the Boston area.

Ora DeJesus has joined the staff
of Oak Hill Nursing Home, Middle-
boro (Mass.) as a full time social
worker.

Judith Hopkins traveled in Europe
with friends. She planned to tour
France, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Ger-
many, Holland, England and Scot-,
land. Judy, daughter of Marjorie
Jones Hopkins '34, is employed by
the New England Telephone Com-
pany as a service representative.

Ann Hudson North is now living in
Charleston, W. Va. (1427 Callie Road)
Her husband is employed by DuPont.



'68

Engagements:

Dorothy G. Clarke to Richard
C. Knight



Cindy Elliott to Timothy J.

McCarthy

Paula L. Hugenberger to Ross

P. Richardson

Lucinda Langlois to Geoffrey

G. Harp

Susan J. Schoen to Dr. Joseph

B. Sappington

Sally C. Warren to Arthur D.

Hall

Susan G. Williams to Manfred

G. Krings

Weddings:

Lynne C. Akeson and John A.

Arimenta on May 30, 1970, in

Short Hills, N.J.

Marlene A. Cutler and Steven

I. Berman on June 28, 1970 in

Longmeadow, Mass.

Marlene Ewart and Peter R.

Bacot on June 13, 1970 in

Burlington, Ontario

Judith-Ann Giftos and Dan W.

Maynard on August 15, 1970

in Pittsfield, Mass.

Lucinda Hooper and Daniel

George Krivitzky on July 19,

1970 in Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.

Lynne Houser and Sgt. Gary

R. Rush USAF on August 15,

1970 in Topsfield, Mass.

Pamela R. Milone and Michael

S. Fornal on June 27, 1970 in

Hamden, Conn.

Elissa S. Ostroff and Leonard

Singer on June 7, 1970 in

Canton, Mass.

Julie A. Robinson and Frederic

P. Kistler on Aug. 22, 1970 in

Vineyard Haven, Mass.

Hope W. Rose and Frederick

C. Angier in June 1970 in
Princeton, N.J.

Ann P. Sager and Ronald M.

MacFarlane in June 1970 in

Byfield, Mass.

Nancy K. Shorter and Ronald

L. Kocher on August 22, 1970

in Belmont, Mass.

Sharon R. Trock and Preston

J. Douglas on August 21, 1970

in Lawrence, L.I.

Dale E. Tufts and Glenn A.

Yale in July 1970 in Salem,

Mass.

Cynthia Ann Walker and Robert

R. Fitzgerald on June 4, 1970

in Los Angeles, Calif.

Karen Werner and Ensign



31



Robert A. Wachtel, U.S.N, on
June 7, 1970 in Framingham,
Mass.
June 1970 degree graduates in-
clude: Susan Peques, Ohio State
University; Kay Thompson, American
College of Switzerland; Cheryl Tocio,
Boston State College.

Donna Daniel was a member of
the queen's court at a spring mili-
tary ball at Hofstra University.



'69

Engagements:

Mary Beth Clark to Salvatore

J. Mollica, Jr.

Susan D. Judd to Charles J.

Griswold

Sherri Germaine to Howard

Gittleman

Christine Hill to Michael V.

Rodden

Lauri Lewis to Richard A.

Crossman

Linda Lione to Philip M. Dangel

Maureen A. Shea to Daniel L.

O'Callaghan

Leah R. Smith to Alan S.

Schneier

JoAnn E. Telega to David S.

Grese

Susan R. Thompson to William

V. Johnson

Patrician A. Twomey to Herbert

R. Vanidestine

Pamela Western to Michael T.

O'Rourke

Weddings:

Kathleen Ahearne and David

R. Pedrick in June 1970 in

Marblehead, Mass.

Mary E. Bryant and William B.

Beamer on August 22, 1970 in

Westfield, Mass.

Sharon Cooper and James N.

Andress on June 5, 1970 in

West Hartford, Conn.

Henrietta M. DiCroce and David

J. Jackman on April 25, 1970 in

Marblehead, Mass.

Sarah E. DuBois and John R.

McLain on June 19, 1970 in

West Hartford, Conn.

Karla W. Englund and John

H. Thompson on June 13, 1970

in West Newton, Mass.

Diane M. Guenther and Duane



L. Keeler in July 1970 in Upper

Montclair, N.J.

Anne Hartstone and Mark S.

Levine in June, 1970 in Bangor,

Maine

Margery E. Hunt and David

K. Harmon in June 1970 in

Cohasset, Mass.

Suzanne LaCoe and Raymond

D. Valade, Jr. on August 29,

1970 in Niantic, Conn.

Tricia H. Levine and Richard

A. Bellsey on August 15, 1970

in New York City

Sharon C. Manoogian and

Donald R. Belseth in May 1970

in Newton, Mass.

Shelly M. Margolis and Gordon

M. Daniels on June 21, 1970 in

Brookline, Mass.

Cynthia A. McCabe and Robert

J. Lister on April 25, 1970 in

Plaistow, N.H.

Melinda Sibley and Mark V.

Brown on April 18, 1970 in

Wayland, Mass.

Suzanne Stern and Jeffrey B.

Nachman on July 26, 1970 in

New York City

Jonatha Tarbox and Craig J.

Zicari on June 20, 1970 in

Brighton, N.Y.

Wendy Woolfort and Howard

S. Cutler on June 7, 1970 in

Syracuse, N.Y.

From Becky Robarts Buyers: "I
have changed my address again and
wanted to inform the Alumnae Asso-
ciation where I am residing (243
Acalanes St., Sunnyvale, Calif.) and
what my occupation is. By the way,
I enjoyed the July reunion issue too!

I am a full time fashion and pho-
tographic model for Demeter Agency
in San Francisco.

I really miss Lasell as most of my
classmates do I am sure!"



70

Engagements:

Marinell Cushman to A 1-C

Willam J. Guazzo

Patricia L. Hermann to John

O. Salter

Sarah Ickowicz to Jeffrey M.

Rosner

Karen I. Thomas to William A.

MacDaniel, Jr.



Weddings:

Phyllis Aikens and Stephen

Paul Cornwall on August 22,

1970.

Carolyn Chandler and Geoffrey

P. Morrell on June 13, 1970 in

Duxbury, Mass.

Caryn Chavkin and Richard J.

King in June 1970 in West

Orange, N.J.

Sally Gabriel and John B.

Kunkel in August 28, 1970 in

Melrose Highlands, Mass.

Alice Jones and Kevin P.

Sheehan on August 23, 1970

in Brockton, Mass.

Leslie R. Kilbourn and Gary E.

Travis in July 1970 in Weston,

Mass.

Kathy A. Kohn and Craig A.

Mulch on August 15, 1970 in

Morristown, N.J.

Marcia J. Morin and Alan H.

Hayward on June 26, 1970 in

Laconia, N.H.

Patricia A. Pate and Paul C.

Taylor on August 15, 1970 in

Bedford, Mass.

Pamela G. Walker and Clark K.

Francis on July 18, 1970 in

Lunenburg, Mass.

Sara R. Worthen and John G.

Sundborg, Jr., on August 22,

1970 in Bristol, N.H.

Susan J. Younger and Jay M.

Niederman on August 16, 1970

in Manchester, N.H.



IN MEMORIAM



Grace Snyder Stephenson '92-
'94 on June 22, 1970 in
Cincinnati, Ohio.

Elizabeth Whitley Peckin Dean
x-'03 on July 8, 1970 in
Plainfield, N.J.

Elizabeth Hazelet Weis x-'15
on December 19, 1966 in
Philadelphia, Penna.



32



CHARLOTTE RYDER HALL BEQUEST




Charlotte Ryder Hall, president and life secretary
of the Class of '08, and one of Lasell's most loyal
alumnae before her death last January, has continued
her support of the College in memoriam. Last month
Lasell received a bequest of $35,000 as an unrestricted
gift from her estate.

In acknowledging the gift, President Greene
expressed particular appreciation for the unrestricted
form of the bequest. There are myriad needs for
additional funds in every college, he pointed out,
and allowing the Administration to apply the money to
those most currently pressing makes the gift doubly
valuable.

Lasell has received a number of such bequests
in recent years, some large, many small. All have been
deeply appreciated, and recognized as generous
expressions of a desire to establish some kind of
living memorial.

Charlotte Ryder Hall has done exactly that. Her
bequest is a testament to her life-long interest in Lasell,
and a moving tribute to her desire to continue her
help even beyond the limits of human life.



LAbbLL JUNIUH LULLbbb

Alumnae Office
Auburndale, Massachusetts 02166

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED



THIRD CLASS MAIL



Non-Profit Org.



U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Auburndale, Mass.
Permit No. 10471














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ujg.






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Lasell Leaves

Winter 1971



Lasell Alumnae, Inc.



Officers 1969-70

President

Sandy Shelton Fitch '56 (Mrs. Norman P.)

9 Fox Lane, Medfield 02052

First Vice-President

Kay Woolaver Parsons '46 (Mrs. George E.)
32 Marcia Road, Watertown 02171

Second Vice-President

Faye Wadhams Smith '38 (Mrs. Edward L.)
Duncaster Lane, Bloomfield, Conn. 06002

Recording Secretary

Betty Williams McGowan '47 (Mrs. F. M., Jr.)
52 Brewster Avenue, Braintree Highlands 02185

Corresponding Secretary

Lee Pool Langley '46 (Mrs. P. B.)
355 Highland Street, Weston 02193

Treasurer

Ruth Turner Crosby '42 (Mrs. R. A.)
170 Harvard Street, Newtonville 02160

Assistant Treasurer

Ruth Buswell Isaacson '36 (Mrs. C. G. G.)

10 Laurel Avenue, Waltham 02154

Alumnae Fund Committee

Alice Pratt Brown '29 (Mrs. William W.)
Crest Road, Middlebury, Conn. 06762

Mildred Bell Cole '31 (Mrs. Oliver S.)
95 Fox Hill Street, Westwood 02090

Louise Tardivel Higgins '37 (Mrs. C. A., Jr.)
150 Hickory Road, Weston 02193

Scholarship Committee Chairman

Virginia Wolfe Perkins '44 (Mrs. E. F., Jr.)
76 Orchard Lane, Melrose 02176



Directors

Mildred Strain Nutter '17 (Mrs. Denton G.)
1094 Centre Street, Newton Centre 02159

Dorothy Inett Taylor '30 (Mrs. L. D.)
41 Brentwood Drive, Holden 01520

Shirley Gould Chesebro '33 (Mrs. R. Alan)
110 Carver Road, Newton Highlands 02161

Camie Porter Morison '40 (Mrs. Wm. K.)
8 Park Ridge, Concord, N.H. 03301

Mary Small Lee '48 (Mrs. Walter C.)
192 Pine Ridge Road, Waban 02168

Joan Wallace Billings '50 (Mrs. Robert E.)
Ivy Road, Sherbom 01770

Linda Nolin Ahern '55 (Mrs. Robert)
106 Hemlock Street, Arlington 02174

Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 (Mrs. Bruce B.)
Box 181, Dover 02030

Nancye Van Deusen Connor '57 (Mrs. Philip J.)
28 Pilgrim Road, Wellesley 02181

Susan Shaw Abbott '61 (Mrs. William S.)
50 Melvin Road, Arlington 02174

Nan Sparks Hunter '61 (Mrs. Carl E.)
69 Main St., Framingham Centre 01701



Alumnae Secretary

Marjorie MacClymon '32

Lasell Junior College, Auburndale 02166

Lasell Leaves

Editor

Patricia Searles

Alumnae Editor

Marjorie MacClymon '32



The Lasell Leaves is published quarterly by Lasell Alumnae, Inc., Lasell Junior College, Auburndale, Mass. 02166,
a member of the American Alumni Council since 1947. The views expressed herein are those of the editor and do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of the administration or Lasell Alumnae, Inc. Single copies of Lasell Leaves may
be obtained for $1.25 from the Alumnae Office.




At the Child Study Center, the subject of a
feature on page 8 of this issue, a pre-
schooler shows he can measure his own
growth — with a little help, he comes on
So Tall.



CREDITS: *

Cover: Lasell '70 takes the next step
forward (see page 2 for a report on
their new activities). Design by Marcia Jean
Jones '71.

Photos: Boston Edison Co.: 1, 8, 9, 10, 11

Chalue: 11, 19

Editor: 10,11

Lenscraft Photos, Inc.: 7

Peter Sweet: 12,13
Design: The Editor
Printing: Crimson Printing Co.



Vol. XCVI No. 2
February 1971



CONTENTS



Class of 1970: Sign in Please 2

John Arnold Resigns as Trustee 7



Child Study Grows , 8

Nahatis Twins in Double Jump 12

The National Scene 14



Who Needs Women's Lib? 15



Alumnae Gifts to the Library 19



Class Notes 20

In Memoriam 32

Announcements 33



CLASS OF 70: SIGN IN PLEASE



The first replies to the annual place-
ment office inquiries to last year's
seniors are in, according to Director
of Placement, Mrs. Juliette K. Fager.
The profile of '70 compiled from these
responses and distributed on campus
recently as a comprehensive fact
sheet, shows the whereabouts of ap-
proximately 50% of the 338-member
graduating class. While more replies
continue to come in, a pattern of
favored choices in both careers and
further study already traces several
trends at work in the selections of the
first class to graduate in the seventies.

Of the total responses, fifty-seven
percent this year were transfer stu-
dents enrolled in further study at col-
leges and universities nationwide. Of
these, an impressive fifty-four percent
elected to study in a variety of pro-
grams in education. Those focussing
on elementary school teaching out-
numbered all others 2 to 1 ; others
more than once showed a continuing
interest in fields of special education
at unspecified grade levels, ranging
from speech to art therapy and educa-
tion, and teaching the mentally re-
tarded.

The fields drawing the most liberal
arts students to advanced courses
were: English, psychology, and sociol-
ogy and urban studies, while one
student each had chosen biology,
math, history, French, sculpture, and
voice. One graduate reported that she
had undertaken her further study of
Spanish abroad, in an academic year
affiliated with Bowling Green.



Two students each were extending
their knowledge of nursing, photog-
raphy, retailing, and interior design;
while medical technology, fashion il-
lustration, home economics, business,
dental hygiene, and journalism, were
chosen by one transfer student apiece.

Of the forty-three percent replying
who chose employment rather than
further study after graduation, pre-
school education was again the most
popular selection, claiming seven of
those seniors reporting on their career
involvement. Following close behind
were: nursing, medical secretarial
work, and retailing — where six gradu-
ates who answered the inquiry said
they were presently trainees in mer-
chandising programs.

Next on a scale of interest were:
art design, secretarial positions in in-
dustry and education, and insurance,
where secretarial and actuarial work
were represented and even a field
service representative reported. Sec-
retaries and clerks in law offices, bank
tellers and clerks, a sales corre-
spondent, a broker's sales assistant,
bookstore manager, waitress, and a
medical transcriber also appeared on
the list. Then there was an owner and
operator of a craft shop, and a flight
attendant and a stewardess serving
two major airlines, to top it all off.

Following is the listing of these
seniors and their present activities as
reprinted from Mrs. Fager's first report;
also included here is the supplement
issued later, after a second inquiry had
been sent to graduates.



1970 GRADUATES ACCEPTED FOR FURTHER EDUCATION



Name

Amorello, Kathleen
Anderson, Nancy
Archer, Mary

Barnard, Barbara
Baroff, Michelle
Bartolotti, Celia
Bauer, Janet
Berk, Nancy
Blinstrub, Helen
Bogle, Margaret
Boisen, Carol



College or School

Framingham State College
Tobe-Coburn School for Fashion Careers
Forsyth Dental School

University of Michigan

Boston University, School of Education

Florida State University

Maryland Institute of Art

University of Denver

Framingham State College

Lesley College

Wheelock College



Major

Kindergarten Ed.
Retailing/Fashion
Dental Hygiene

Elementary Ed.
Elementary Ed.
English

Art Ed. /Photography
Elementary Ed.
Kindergarten Ed.
Elementary Ed.
Primary Ed.



Name



College or School



Major



Brewer, Susan
Brody, Enid

Carsley, Susan
Cook, Pamela
Cooley, Barbara
Culley, Patricia

Davison, Laurel
Donovan, Theresa

Falsey, Marilyn
Field, Georgiana
Foss, Kirstin
Fuchs, Monica

Gantz, Barbara
Giso, Christine
Gravert, Arlene
Greenberg, Susan

Hanson, Lorna
Hervey, Anne
Holt, Charlene

Horowitz, Sheila
Hunt, Deborah

Iddles, Andrea
Ives, Jane

Jaffee, Ellen

Kaplan, Laurie



Karelis, Nancy
Karson, Sharon
Keim, Teresa
Kimerling, Deborah
Kitaeff, Karla
Kositchek, Barbara
Kuhnberg, Linda

Lefebre, Shirley
Lobovits, Susan
Loeb, Mary

McMillin, Enid
Maas, Sue
Mandeville, Jane
Marcus, Madelon
Maxon, Leslie
Mayock, Catherine
Miller, Rebecca

Norett, Audree

O'Neill, Jane
'Ovian, Karyn



Palmer, Patricia
Parisi, Nancy



Boston University, School of Education
Emerson College



Elementary Ed.
Speech Ed.



Pratt Institute Interior Design

Wheelock College Elementary Ed.

Tobe-Coburn School for Fashion Careers Merchandising

West Liberty State College History

Bridgewater State College
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Boston University, School of Education
Guilford College
Boston Conservatory of Music
Boston University, School of Education

Finch College

Mt. St. Joseph College

Boston University

Boston University, College of Liberal Arts

University of Miami, Coral Gables
University of Maine, Orono
Academic Year Abroad

(Affiliated with Bowling Green)
Boston University
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Cornell University, School of Nursing
Mills College, Oakland, California

Boston University

New York School of Interior Design

Also: Student work at Bloomingdale's

New Jersey
Boston University, School of Education
Boston University
Massachusetts College of Art
University of Florida, Gainesville
University of Bridgeport
Lake Forest College
Boston University, School of Education

University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Boston University, School of Education
Wheelock College

University of Kentucky

Case Western Reserve University

Duke University

Boston University, School of Education

University of Bridgeport

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Ohio State University

University of Florida

University of Colorado, Boulder
Northeastern University (Part-time)
*Jan. 71 Northeastern — Training Course at
Mass. General/McLean Hospitals

Boston School of Cytotechnology
University of Massachusetts, Amherst



Elementary Ed.


Education


Elementary Ed.


Elementary Ed.


Voice


Elementary Ed.


Elementary Ed.


Elem. Ed. /English


Biology


English


Math


Elementary Ed.


Spanish


Special Ed.


Elementary Ed.


Nursing


History


Special Ed.


Interior Design


Elementary Ed.


Fashion I II us.


Sociology


Sociology


Psychology


Elementary Ed.


Child Development


Elementary Ed.


Early Child. Ed.



Elementary Ed.

Psychology

Nursing

Elementary Ed.

Elementary Ed.

English

Elem. Spec. Ed. /Mentally Retard.

Elementary Ed.

Sociology
Art Therapy



Psychology



Name

"Pierce, Sarah

"Potter, Shari



Pressman, Gail
Provenzano, Donna
Purves, Betsy

Regenstreif, Ellen
Resnick, Valerie
Rich, Joanne
Richards, Janice
Robbie, Diane
Rogean, Marcia

Scangas, Kathryn
Schwartz, Deborah
Snyder, Deborah
Swartz, Marcia

Tfank, Barbara
Tharl, Karen
Thomas, Shirin

Walker, Belinda
Waters, Ellen
Weil, Susan
Williams, Janice
Wolfe, Ann

*Wolfe, Barbara

Wright, Victoria



College or School

*Feb. 71 — University of Miami,

Coral Gables
*Feb. 71 — University of Massachusetts,

Boston Now attending Boston State

Evening School
Perry Normal School
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
University of New Hampshire

George Washington University
Briarcliff College
Massachusetts College of Art
Boston State College
Lesley College
University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire
Boston University
University of Connecticut
Wheelock College

Skidmore College

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

University of Massachusetts, Boston

Brandeis University

Southern Connecticut State College

American University

State University College at Oneonta

Art Students League

Also: Part-time C. W. Post College
Santa Fe Junior College
*Jan. 71 — University of Florida
Boston University



Major

Business

French



Early Education
Elementary Ed.
Med. Tech.

Sociology

English

Art Education

Elementary Ed.

Special Ed.

Home Economics

Psychology

Elementary Ed.

Early Elem. Ed. /Psych. (Minor)

Elementary Ed.
Child Development
English

Sociology/Urban Studies

Early Child. Ed.

Journalism

Psychology

Sculpture

Photography

Education

Education



Name

Abelson, Carol

Ball, Mary Lou
"Braden, Rondi

Brooks, Laura

Chidsey, Cynthia
Cushman, Marinell

Dunn, Alice

Fleming, Nancy

Grzenda, Joan

Holbrook, Joan

Kiley, Ellen
King, Joan

Lucca, Serena

McGuckian, Eileen
Marshall, Joanne
Moore, Lisa
Marshall, Georgia



SUPPLEMENTARY LISTING

College or School

Boston University, School of Education

University of Kentucky

Universita Italiana per Stranieri, Perugia,
Italy

*Special Student

Boston Univ., School of Public Communica-
tions

Boston University, School of Education
St. Cleo College

Northeastern University

University of New Hampshire

University of Bridgeport

Boston University (Special Senior)

Marietta College
Rollins College

University of Bridgeport

Northeastern University, Lincoln College
Boston University, School of Education
Wheelock College
Boston University, C.L.A.



Major

Elementary Ed.
Sociology

Italian Lang.

Public Re I. /Advertising

Elementary Ed.
Elementary Ed.

Speech/Hearing Therapy

Home Ec./Child Study

Sociology

Nursing

Elementary Ed.
Psychology

Journalism



Elementary Ed.
Education



Niedringhaus, Lynda



Boston University



Special Ed. /Mental Retard.



Name

Robbie, Diane

Samble, Donna
Shorser, Laurie
Sutter, Elizabeth

Trudeau, Nan

Van Allen, Elizabeth
Von Elm, Barbara



College or School

Lesley College

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Parsons School of Design

State University College, New Paltz, N.Y.

Massachusetts College of Art

Ohio State University
University of Denver



Major

Special Ed.

Education
Illustration
Secondary Ed. /Social Studies

Art Education

Clothing/Social Studies
Sociology



PLACEMENT LIST— 1970 GRADUATES



Name

Aikens, Phyllis
Anderson, Linda



Barnes, Elizabeth
Brennan, Jean
Brimblecom, Lee

Cabot, Susan
Carlucci, Elizabeth
Cole, Nancy Jane
Connell, Joan
Cordsten, Terry

Deveneau, Jacqueline
Dorsey, Elizabeth

Erickson, Jane
Eustice, Joan

Farley, Constance
Fogle, Linda Jo

Gagne, Linda
Garner, Kimberly
Goon, Jean

Haley, Sally
Hibbert, Melanie
Hoxie, Joann
Hoyt, Jennifer

Jenkins, Linda
Johnson, Gail
Juthe, Laurel

Kilbourn, Leslie

Lainez, Linda
Lassiter, Pamela
Lamb, Candace
Lowry, Janice
Lyon, Kathryn

McKnight, Lynn
Marvin, Michele
Mason, Donna
Mather, Gail
Meyer, Marjorie
Mills, Deborah

Nichols, Shari

O'Connor, Jeannine

Oldroyd, Mallory



Position

Secy./Receptionist — Admissions Office, Middlesex Sch., Concord

Exec. Secy to Dir. Planning & Research Group Systems Development, John Hancock Mutual
Life Ins. Co.

Secretary — Educational Div., Reader's Digest, Pleasantville, N.Y.

Secretary — Dr. Arnold C. Comens, Orleans, Mass.

R.N. — Emergency Dept., Children's Hospital Medical Center

R.N. — Phelps Memorial Hospital, North Tarrytown, N.Y.

Asst. Buyer — Mercantile Stores Co., N.Y.C.

Sales Correspondent — B. F. Goodrich Chemical Co., Wellesley

Brokers' Sales Asst. — E. F. Hutton & Co., Inc., Boston

Art Assistant Designer

Teacher — Babcock Kindergarten School, Brookline
Field Services Rep. — Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., Newton

R.N. — Cape Cod Hosp., Hyannis; Memorial Hosp., No. Conway, N.H.
Head Teacher, 3 yr. olds — Kendall Nursery School, Belmont

Receptionist & Artwork — Saul Krieg Associates, N.Y.C.

Exec. Secy. — Industrial Chemical Div., Allied Chemical Corp., III.

Teacher — Babcock Kindergarten School, Brookline

Teacher's Aide — Ernest Hemingway Elem. Sch., Sun Valley, Idaho

Medical Secy. — David S. Walton, M.D., Children's Hospital

Medical Secy. — Frederick M. Davies, M.D., Newton-Wellesley Hosp.
Secy, to National Service Mgr., Adamation, Inc., Newton
Med. Secy. — Drs. Earle, Shause, Nauss — Pediatricians, Children's Hospital
Associate Sales Mgr. — Exec. Training Program, Jordan Marsh Co.

Office Work — Beebe, Blakeley & Forbes, Inc., Insurance, Boston

Assistant Buyer — Mercantile Stores, N.Y.C.

Medical Transcriptionist — Med. Records Dept., Newton-Wellesley Hospital

Kindergarten Teacher — Carey Country Day School, Billerica

Medical Secy. — Albert L. Sheffer, M.D., Boston

Stewardess — United Air Lines

Service Representative — Hartford National Corp.

Secy, to Chm. Alumni Assn. & Public Relations, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, Boston

Owner & Operator — Crafts Shop, South Middleboro, Mass.

Secy. — Cohen, Rosenthal, Hans & Boyle, Attys., Springfield

Salesgirl — Harvard Coop. — Entering their Training Program — Feb. 71

R.N. — Emergency Staff Nurse, Englewood Hosp., Englewood, N.J.

Fight Attendant — Eastern Airlines

Working at Sears Roebuck Company

Secretary — Medical Admissions Office, University of Buffalo

Waitress at "Oleanas", Rockport, Massachusetts

Private Secretary to Administrator of New & Information Public Relations Dept., RCA Corpora-
tion. N.Y.C.
Art Work — Advertising Dept., Mt. Snow Valley News



Name

Ovian, Karyn

Plimpton, Cynthia
Potter, Shari

Robin, Caryn

Sand, Sharon
Shack, Dianne
Shinners, Shannon
Skeans, Diane
Stewart, Mardee
Summerell, Mary

Thomen, Marianne
Tibbetts, Elizabeth
Tredinnick, Leslie

Walker, Pamela
Wallins, Donna
Whipple, Margaret
White, Christine

Zitser, Harriet



Position

Part-time Arts & Crafts Teacher — Dorchester Settlement House
(Jan. 71 — Art Therapy Training Course, Northeastern University)

Staff Nurse — Orthopedic Unit, Children's Hospital Med. Center
Master Charge Dept., First National Bank, Boston
(Feb. '71 — Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston — full time)

Actuary — New England Mutual Life Insurance Co., Boston

Asst. Nursery Sch. Teacher — Temple Beth Avodah, Newton Centre
Medical Secy. — X-Ray Dept., South Shore Hospital, Weymouth
R.N. — Staff Nurse, Massachusetts General Hospital
Medical Secretary — Dr. Nasrullah, Medway
Medical Secretary — Harry Bauer, M.D., Needham
Trainee — Sears Roebuck & Co., Burlington

Mail Teller — Hartford National Bank & Trust Co.
Bookstore Manager — Nasson College, Springvale, Maine
Clerk/Typist — Hutchins & Wheeler, Attys., Boston

Staff Nurse — Framingham Union Hospital, Framingham
Exec. Secy — American Jewish Committee, West Hartford, Conn.
Worked for Manpower during summer; plans winter at Mt. Snow
Junior Executive Trainee — Grover Cronin, Inc.

Medical Secy — Surgical Pathology Dept., Yale University



SUPPLEMENTARY LISTING



Name

Beck, Barbara

Benn, Candyce

*Blumberg, Ellen



Calo, Virginia
Campagna, Christina
Casciello, Linda
Ciecko, Arlene

Dreyfus, Deborah

Finnegan, Paula
Fitzgerald, Barbara

Hart, Judith
Heaviside, Jan
'Holbrook, Joan



Kibling, Mary
*Lucca, Serena

*McGuckian, Eileen

Marchionne, Christine

Pansini, Leigh

Redfield, Eleanor
Rizzo, Mary Ann

Stiles, Janet

Wells, Nancy
White, Janet



Position

Private Secretary-Metropolitan Regional Manager, N.J.

Secy. — Assessment Div., Bureau Corporation & Taxation, Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Buying Offices of Mass. Bargainland

*Southeastern Mass. Univ. Evening Division

Staff Nurse — Norwood Hospital

Charge Nurse — Nursing Home

Secretary — Dublin-Mindell-Bloome, Consulting Engineers, Conn.

Correspondence Dept. Mediment Claim Office, Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., Utica, N. Y.

Staff Nurse — The Hospital for Special Surgery, N.Y.C.

Teacher — Wolfeboro Cooperative Kindergarten, N.H.
Ward Secretary — Beth Israel Hospital

Secretary — Mutual of New York Life Insurance Company
Junior Secy. — New England Merchants National Bank
Staff Nurse — New England Deaconess Hospital
*Also: Attending Boston University (Special Senior)

Teacher — Living and Learning School, Inc., Waltham

Researcher — Cost Study of Trusts, Hartford Natl. Bank & Trust
*Also: Attending University of Bridgeport

Clerk/Secretary — New England Baptist Hospital, Roxbury
*Also: Attending Lincoln College, Northeastern University

Secy. — Granite Insurance Agency, Inc., Quincy

Asst. to Manager — Boys' Dept., Saks Fifth Avenue, N.Y.

Medical Secy. — Drs. Golden & Bennett, Pediatricians, Framingham
Secy, to Vice Pres., Morsid Corp. (Mediprint, Inc.), Waltham

Receptionist — Biology Department, Boston University

Underwriter, Policy Change of Group Insurance, Aetna Life Ins. Co., Hartford
Staff Nurse — Newton-Wellesley Hospital



Wong, Judith



Receptionist — Keane Associates, Inc.



JOHN ARNOLD RESIGNS AS TRUSTEE




John L. Arnold



The resignation of John L. Arnold as a
trustee of the College, announced at the
October meeting of the Board of Trustees,
marks the end of an era for Lasell.

In 1949, when the decision was made to
replace old Woodland (located on Washington
Street) with a new, fire-resistant building, the
financial problem was enormous, and the funds
were impossible to obtain. Eventually, through
Mr. Arnold's efforts, a relatively new method
of financing was devised and Woodland
was built. That same year, in recognition of his
successful work on Lasell's behalf, Mr.
Arnold was elected to the College's Board of
Trustees. A year or so later he was elected
Treasurer of the College.



Under his financial leadership, Lasell almost
immediately embarked upon a program of
physical expansion without equal in its
previous 100-year history. In 1955, Wass
Science Building was completed; in 1959,
Ordway House; and in 1963, Wolfe Hall. Then
in 1965 the Trustees voted to embark upon the
most ambitious building venture to date: the
construction simultaneously of a new library
(financed in part by a government grant), a new
dormitory, and an addition to Woodland Hall
which, in fifteen years had completely outgrown
both its dormitory and dining-room facilities.
To accomplish this, a $1,700,000 loan was
arranged, this time without the need to
mortgage a single piece of Lasell property. Mr.
Arnold's role in these negotiations should
not be underestimated.

Fortunately for Lasell, Mr. Arnold continues
in his position as Treasurer of the College. In
addition, he serves as a Director of Pneumo-
Dynamics Inc. of Cleveland; Atco Chemical
and Industrial Corporation, New Jersey;
Friends, Inc., Boston; La Touraine Co., Boston;
La Maisonette, Inc., Boston; and Woodcraft
Supply Corporation, Boston. He is a member
of both the Massachusetts and the Federal Bar
Associations and is a trustee of the Spaulding
Youth Center in Tilton, New Hampshire as well
as other associations.

June Babcock

Academic Dean of the College



CHILD STUDY GROWS





Vs?



s. Muriel Sheppard




Mrs. Elaine Cavanaugh



In Rockwell there is no one
particular noise level — in fact you
never can be sure just what you-may
hear next, or from whom. You are in a
world of children's experiences,
with its many crescendos from
frustration to joy, and all the quick
changes in between.

It is here at Lasell's Child Study
Center, where the first experiences of
growing and participating with others
in a learning situation can be seen,
that course work for child study majors
comes alive in learning first-hand
about teaching nursery school —
and about the nursery-schoolers
themselves.



Mrs. Elaine Cavanaugh, who is th'
director of the Center, came to Lasell
eight years ago when it had been in
existence for about four years and hac
an average enrollment of between
seven and nine four-year-olds each
year. Then, as now, most of these
children were from Auburndale and
other nearby Newton communities
and preference was given to sons and
daughters of faculty members.

Today, with thirty-eight children
attending — twenty-four children in twi
groups of threes (young and old) as
well as fourteen fours — about
twenty-five seniors each semester
gain practice teaching experience





working with one of these three groups
who come to the Center two, three,
and five mornings per week,
respectively.

Mrs. Cavanaugh and Mrs. Muriel
Sheppard, who is chairman of the
child study department, agree that
observation and teaching/assisting in
this setting is as important as the
course work they supplement. So even
this year, with a total of almost 250
freshmen enrolled in the child study
program, arrangements have been
made for all of them to have some
direct experience observing young
children in a field work assignment.

As a result, about three-quarters
of this group has been divided to
provide tutoring at the nearby Lyman
School, volunteer services at the
Fernald School, or are assigned to
observe at the Williams School
adjacent to the campus. The remaining
quarter observe and assist the full-
time teaching staff of the Center,
which includes alumnae Pat Ryan
Cantin '63, Barbara Montag Levy '58,
and Janet Hart Wilson '53.



Until this year, all of the activities
of the Child Study Center have been
contained in and around Rockwell,
but with the addition of twelve children
in the new "low 3's" group this year
and the postponement of anticipated
renovations on its second floor, its
seams were more than bursting.

The possibility of creating new
space in the garage behind the
main building seemed to answer the
problem. So, the "Studio Garage," as
it was immediately named, was quickly
annexed, redecorated, and refurnished
with play equipment just in time for
the opening of school. As a handy
recess area in all weather, when used
as it now is on a regular schedule,
it also allows a convenient separation
between age groups and activities in
an area small enough for any size of
group to be easily supervised.

Organization, in fact, is an
important part of the functioning of the
Center. Since there is usually a
ratio of about one child to every three
or four teachers or assistants, much
of the so-called organized time can be
unguided, yet kept under control
without continuous group planning.



The first period in the morning, from
8:45 to 9:30, for example, is a time
when the children can do what they
like — and there's plenty to choose
from. A sand table and water table, all
at a four-year-old's level, easels for
crayoning and watercoloring, even
tables for building such popular
concoctions as noodle and paste
designs are at hand, while an odd
assortment of giant wire spools and
soap drums provide things to hammer
and paint outside . . .things to do
together, or alone.

Then there is a second morning
period for "art or science experience."
Here, among familiar natural
phenomena and a host of live animals
including a rabbit, gerbils, and a
hamster, the children can learn simple
facts about nature, such as how and
why water evaporates or crystallizes on
the rabbit's dish. They can also
cook anything they like from butter,
pudding and cookies, to cranberry
relish — themselves, on equipment built
to exactly match their reach.

After this, they are again free to
choose to play alone or participate in a
group with structured activities or
not, with no set program prescribed
until the end of the morning.

Second-year students actually do
all the planning for these activities.
They are required to take physical
science, and to have some experience



The Studio Garage, newly renovated to provide an
annex for the Child Study Center has been colorfully painted and equipped as
a play area. The inscription on the sign in front reads: "Tall have fun now —
hear! The Physical Plant Dept."



with music, art, and children's
literature, in addition to gaining a basic
knowledge of child development and
orientation in early childhood.
Planning for these ages draws upon
resources from an immense span of
experiences, says Mrs. Cavanaugh,
and, she adds, one experience of a
certain type is never enough.

To make this phase of their
learning more meaningful, she asks
that child study majors who are
teaching and assisting write down their
experiences thus reviewing and
assimilating them, in order to make
the most of the learning opportunity
they offer and to share them with
others in the program. For the
same reason this year she has started
a seminar one afternoon per week
where students can discuss the
incidents and problems that have
come up during the week, analyze
them, focus on the important points in
the situation, and pool their insights
into these problems together.




The problems are often diverse,
since there has been no attempt to
keep the groups homogeneous at any
age level. If there are children with
special behavior problems of any kind,
there is ample opportunity for them to
have the attention they need and to
find a means of expression to work out
their difficulties.

Each year the Center tries, too, to
include in the enrollment children
who need help with special learning
problems, including aphasics and
those with other impeding disabilities.
In recent years they have also almost
always had several sets of twins
adding another kind of variety to the
group. They hope to continue to
increase the number of children
enrolled on scholarship at the Center
each year as well.

Making both the teaching and
learning experiences at the Center
meaningful for children and
student-teachers alike, as Mrs.
Cavanaugh sees it, depends on provid-
ing as wide a breadth of experience in
this necessarily brief exposure as is
possible.

Also to establish a broad base of
experience, Mrs. Sheppard tries to
assure that the first year of observation
experience for freshmen and the
second-year teaching/assisting
program take place on two distinct
levels. In this way each student
becomes involved with a full array of
types of problems associated with
different ages of children.

Consequently, Mrs. Cavanaugh
and Mrs. Sheppard also agree that the
experience offered in the Lasell
program alone should not necessarily
be counted as a full practice teaching
situation, even in states which have
relaxed their practice teaching
requirements to accept other than
public school experience in the face of
the continuing shortage of teachers
at the pre-school level.

The department also urges a wide
exposure even for those students
who have, early in their freshman year,




10



I






already chosen a specialized area of
education or age they wish to teach.
There are increasing numbers of
students, for example, coming into the
program who have already had some
experience during high school
working with Head Start or handi-
capped children, many of whom know
exactly which branch of special edu-
cation they wish to pursue.

Just as the department advises
students who want to work with
fours to learn all they can about threes
and fives — to know what you're
building on and where you're going,
which is valuable to any teacher, says
Mrs. Cavanaugh — they urge these
students, too, to become well
acquainted with the normal child
through their practice teaching ex-
perience as preparation for teaching
children with specific problems
later. Once you know what normal
behavior is, they feel, you are better
able to cope with and encourage
abnormal children toward normal
development.

As the Center grows, changes
seem to suggest themselves and new
directions emerge. For example, this
year the presence of the new three-
year-olds gave some of the trouble-
some and competitive fours someone
to explain and show things to, so that
there has been more sharing de-
veloping between groups than ever
before.



Presently Mrs. Cavanaugh also
plans to extend the interchange in
seminars with student teachers this
year to reach beyond to an improved
communication in sessions with
parents. Including student-teachers in
these meetings could also provide
better understanding of the ways in
which some of these problems can be
resolved with the cooperation of the
child's family.

Meanwhile, cooperation with other
members of the Lasell community
continues to provide new vistas for the
children, from tours of campus
facilities and the recent Christmas
activities planned for them in the
library and at the student nurses'
bazaar, to trips to Owen's Turkey Farm
and the new Aquarium in Boston by
Lasell bus.

Mrs. Cavanaugh hopes even more
cooperation may develop with other
departments on campus who can share
and learn from working with this age
group. Our very first concern is the
children, she adds, and the great joy
of being in Auburndale where many
of these children live, is to see
how some of them turn out later on,
when nursery school is far behind.



/here we're always busy, busy





f



a



mm i





11





Falling from 2800 feet at 150 miles per hour is like
floating, according to the Nahatis twins, Christina and
Johanna ('71), and — it's fun. Their new-found sport of
sky-diving, perhaps one of the most esoteric ever to
claim so much enthusiasm so quickly, caught the in-
terest of Boston Globe correspondent Evelyn Keene
who decided to write a story about the twins. Her
article, which follows, was published in the November
17, 1970 issue of the Globe. The photographs shown
here were taken at Orange, Mass. during their first and
second jumps.




The daredevil Nahatis twins look
alike, think alike, and see eye-to-eye
on just about everything, including
their latest hobby of sky-diving.

Johanna and Christina Nahatis are
identical twins. They live in Man-
chester and study retailing at Lasell
Junior College in Newton.

In their spare time they are planning
their next jump at the Orange Airport
where they trained just about a year
ago to parachute 2800 feet onto a
sand pile target.

The twins are among the few girl
parachutists and the only twins in
the country to take up the sport.
They like it so much they are trying to
persuade their roommates at Lasell to
try it.

The 19-year-old twins (Johanna is
just six minutes older than Christina)
said more or less in unison, they like
the "feel of the wind rushing at us,
and the reassuring tap on the back
from the instructor when he signals us
to jump, but best of all, the sensation
of floating alone through space when
the nylon rip-cord is detached from
the plane ... the most fantastic
trip of all."



Neither girl has any fear, but
they haven't been able to convert
their older brothers, 23 and 21, and a
sister 22, to jumping. Although their
parents, Christos and Alice Nahatis,
apparently approve, Mr. Nahatis
refuses to watch their dives.

The twins got the sky-diving bug
from a couple in Manchester,
Mr. and Mr. Condon McDonough,
who have been on television shows
that depict sky-diving. They decided
about a year ago to take the in-
structions offered by Parachutes,
Inc. at Orange Airport, about 100
miles from their home.

They made two jumps before the
Thanksgiving weekend, and, providing
the weather is good, plan soon to
make a third. The first time they tried
they admitted to "just a little fear,"
but the second time, "there is a feeling
of excitement . . . you want to get
out and feel the wind."

But like all sisters, they worry a
little about each other. When one girl
is floating through the air, she looks
up to see her sister just exiting and
they keep an eye on each other.




fc »4 ' I



12





1. Lacing up for training is Johanna on the
left and Christina on the right. 2. Christina
showing arch-position which jumper takes on
exiting from the aircraft. 3. Johanna showing
position to take before landing. 4. Christina
being strapped up with her main parachute.
5. Johanna being strapped with reserve chute
in front. 6. Christina, left, and Johanna, right,
sitting in order before boarding the plane. 7.
All aboard. 8. Here goes ... 9. Christina on
the way down.



The sisters echo each other's
sentiments on sky-diving and on every
other conceivable subject. They are
majoring in retailing at Lasell, but they
have already applied to airlines to
get stewardess jobs. Both want to
travel, meet people and see the world,
especially Greece, their favorite
country and home of their ancestors.

To look at, they're a little hard to
tell apart. Their long-long dark hair
frames classic Grecian features.
Johanna admits to weighing just a little
more than Christina. And Christina
says Johanna is brainier.

The giris are accomplished
swimmers and tennis players and sing
soprano. They have soft, lilting
speaking voices and wide happy
smiles.

During the Christmas season they'll
be working in an exclusive downtown
department store, as part of a work-
study program and saving for their
next jump. They've also done some
modeling.




13



THE NATIONAL SCENE



�� New Options: It is time to change the
"historic degree structure" of colleges
and universities, says the Carnegie
Commission on Higher Education,
and to introduce a whole new set of
options for education beyond the
high school. In a report that is sure to
help stimulate the growing movement
for academic reform, the commission
has put its considerable prestige
behind these ideas:

— Students are spending too much
time in college. Requirements for
the bachelor's degree could be cut
from four years to three "without
sacrificing educational quality," the
commission says, while another year
or two could be saved on the way to
the Ph.D. and to medical practice.

— High school graduates should be
given more opportunities to postpone
or bypass formal college work, to
"stop-out" from college for job experi-
ence, and to change directions in
college.

— Much greater use should be made
of two relatively new degrees: the
Master of Philosophy, for those
planning to teach in high schools,
community colleges, and the lower
division in colleges; and the Doctor of
Arts, as the standard degree for
"non-research" college teachers.

— The expansion of college-level
tests and off-campus instruction can
lead to college degrees earned with-
out actual college residence.

Some colleges already are moving
toward such reforms. In one effort,
17 institutions have received federal
funds to create a "university without
walls," in which student of various
ages will be given wide flexibility
for independent study and "self-
direction."

The commission's proposals could
have an important side benefit. If they
were put into effect, it says, higher
education could expect to save several
billions of dollars a year by 1980.

�� Financial Woes: The extent of higher
education's crisis in finance has been
outlined in dramatic fashion by the
Carnegie Commission. Based on a
study of 41 colleges and universities
of different types, the panel has
concluded that about two-thirds of all



A Report on New Ideas for
Higher Education

The following newspage (Vol. 2, No. 4Q/December
1970) was prepared by the editors of the Chronicle of
Higher Education for use in alumnae publications to
keep college alumnae nationwide informed on the cur-
rent issues and problems in higher education.



institutions today (1,540) are "in
financial difficulty" or are headed in
that direction. The situation is seen as
the worst in history, amounting to what
the study terms a "new depression."

For many institutions, the crisis has
gone beyond mere "belt-tightening"
and has led to cuts in important
services. Clark Kerr, the commission's
chairman, says the institutions'
greatest need may be to restore public
confidence.

�� Ph.D. Excess? By the end of this
decade, some experts say, our gradu-
ate schools may be turning out at least
twice as many doctorate-holders as
they did in 1969. That might sound
like something to cheer about, but
educators are worried. They look at
the drop in federal support for
graduate study and wonder whether it
isn't time the universities began
holding back on new programs. A few
private universities, in fact, already
have announced plans to curtail
graduate enrollments, and federal
budget-makers are said to be thinking
along similar lines.

"The watchword for the 1970's will
no doubt be to limit and even reduce
the number of doctoral programs,"
says a knowledgeable U.S. official,
"and improve the quality of those that
remain." Some educators, however,
urge the universities to proceed
cautiously at this point, lest they end
up unable to satisfy the nation's need
for highly educated professionals.

�� In Brief: Most institutions say they
do not discriminate against women

in administrative and faculty positions,
reports the American Association of
University Women. But a survey



by the association finds that women
seldom have major policymaking
responsibilities ortop-leve! positions
on the faculty . . .

A hundred scholars from nine
nations, including the U.S., have
formed an International Committee on
the University Emergency. Purpose:
"To protect the rights of teachers
and students to study together in
peace and freedom" . . .

Projections of college enrollments
point to worrisome trends for private
institutions. One study suggests that
the private-college share of enroll-
ments may drop to only 15 per cent by
1985, compared with about 25 per
cent now . . .

An association of 274 state colleges
and universities has, in effect, with-
drawn its endorsement of a code of
principles on academic freedom and
tenure. The group called for more
stress on faculty responsibility and
competence . . .

A committee of the National
Collegiate Athletic Association has
proposed that financial need be made
the basis for athletic scholarships.
Possible effects would be reduced
expenses for athletic departments and
a more even distribution of athletic
talent among institutions . . .

The National Labor Relations
Board, which conducts collective-
bargaining elections and guards
against unfair labor practices, has
extended its jurisdiction to most
private colleges.



14



WHO NEEDS WOMEN'S LIB?



The following excerpts were taken
from an hour-long taped discussion
which took place on December 1 when
women's liberationist Linda Christian
and six students were the luncheon
guests of Dr. and Mrs. Greene at the
President's house. The third guest to
be invited to participate in a series
of celebrity lunches being held for the
first time this year, Mrs. Christian came
as a representative of the 3-year-old
National Organization for Women
(NOW), the organization founded by
Betty Friedan to help implement Title 7
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to
include women, as a discriminated-
against minority.

In talking about the activities of the
eastern regional chapter of NOW, Mrs.
Christian outlined each of the separate
concerns of its different task forces,
all of which, she said, are attempting to
change the position of women in
American society through legal and
persuasive means. These include:
evaluating the legal position of
women — and by understanding what
that situation is to attempt to change
it, abortion and birth control, equal
academic opportunities, women's
position in organized religion, day care
centers, and the image of women in
the advertising media.

The six students participating in the
discussion were: Ruth (Bunty) Field
'71, Brockton, Mass.; Mary Bracken '71,
New Canaan, Conn.; Louise Silverman
'71, Lawrence, N.Y.; Linda Calve '71,
Darien, Conn.; Louise Adler '71, Scars-
dale, N.Y.; and Hind a Gottlieb '72,
Oceanside, N.Y. Their separate com-
ments have been keyed with dots
in the following transcript. Mrs.
Christian's remarks are prefaced by
the initials LC.



Reporting on the following discussion for the Lasell News, Louise
Adler '71 said, ". . . We came to the realization that Women's
Liberation is Men's Liberation as well."



• You made me think, when you
were talking about how women are
represented in the media, about
newspaper ads where they advertise
for gal fridays. They refer to women as
gals or girls and yet they never refer
to men as guys, — beyond the fact

the jobs are so different.

LC: Well, at Harvard, it's always the
Harvard men and the Radcliffe girls,
and I think this shows as much as
anything else the attitudes as to what
young women are. You can be a
fifty-year-old grandmother, and you'll
still be referred to as a girl, especially
if you're a secretary for man. Now
a lot of women evidently seem to think
this is very flattering . . . but the
implications of this: that you are
always an immature dependent no
matter how old you are. ... I think
you have to think about it, and come
to terms with it.

• A problem that I guess you'll have
is that a lot of women like that. They
like the idea of being dependent and
not having to worry about where the
next meal will come from, and I

think maybe you will have to try to
change that; to say, now don't be
afraid, you can stand on your own two
feet.

• I think we're going to have to start
teaching that when children are 16
months old, because by the time
they're three, they see a big difference
between girls and boys, and it's not
just a physical difference. They're
treated different. Different things are
expected of them. Different things

are allowed. I wonder if it's possible
to start changing attitudes of a woman
50 years old or even 30 years old.
We really have to examine how these
attitudes come on women — I think
it's at least three years old.



15



LC: We have a very sexually
regimented society, and it is obviously
one that a lot of people have found
pleasing for a number of years, but,
on the other hand, the toll it has taken
in terms of the life styles in this
country, particularly those of educated
women, has been quite amazing.
Women have been educated at fine
colleges and universities for well over
100 years and yet the actual positions
that these women have been able to
find in a non-volunteer way are strik-
ingly low, and they usually have to go
into what is considered a woman's
field, if they go into a field.

• I regret it when I see a woman
who has a fine education and then
settles down and gets married and
although she might want to go out and
work, she is limited because she does
have children — and her husband says,
well you should stay home and bring
up our family. She has this education,
his may have been even less than
hers, and yet he can go out to work
and she has to stay in the house.

LC: What do you think about the
type-casting of Freudian psychology.
I think this is very interesting because
you know the minute you start to
discuss these things, you always run
up against this . . . well dear, yes,
you may want to go out and do things,
but isn't that because you're neurotic?
After all, haven't you read your Freud?

• Yes, but if you read your Freud,
you also realize that all Freud could
come up with at the end was "What do
women want?" I mean that's not very
smart.

LC: And it's very interesting. In his
lectures on psychoanalysis he depicts
the most unbelievable monster as
the average woman. Her whole mature
heterosexuality is based on envy and
masochism. At the age of thirty, he
says, most women are so rigidly
formed psychologically that psycho-
analysis can only relieve their
suffering. It can never change them in
any way because they have no more
potentiality; the whole effort to change
the object of their affection from their
mother to their father has so sapped
their vitality that they have no libido
left and are rigidly cast in the role
of a woman. They have no sense of



social justice, he said, they are ruled
by vanity, which, he said, is an attempt
to hide their sexual deficiency, and
modesty which is just a recognition
of this fact. And, at the very end of
the lecture he says . . . occasionally,
however, we will see the human being
under this exterior, and that's his end.

• For a very large segment of
society it is true that women are more
vain than men, but if you look at the
reasons why, it's very interesting.

If you don't look like what the ads
depict as the ideal woman, then you're
right there cutting yourself off from
being appreciated or even being
noticed by 48% of the population.

• But, you know, men have the
same problem. They have to look a
certain way; they have to act a certain
way. So they're in the same rut
we're in.

• Except in this society today, a
man has more outlets, and that makes
him less oppressed.

• No, no it doesn't. It makes him
oppressed in a different way.

• I consider the outlets that a man
has, and the careers that are available
today extremely oppressing, but that's
my personal philosophy. . . . But, a
woman, in this same social structure,
can't get anything except what she
can get from men. I mean a woman
can't have a job that can earn her
enough money to live on by herself.
She can do the same job a man does
and receive $2000 a year less than he
receives, so she has fewer outlets.

• A man can't live in the house if he
wants to and take care of the children.

• I think there are very few men
that want to do that.

LC: He CAN, if he's willing to put up
with the opprobrium that society
will push on him for doing this, just as
a woman is free to go out and have
a career provided she is willing to put
up with the guff that she will have to
for having a life style that is somewhat
different from that of her neighbors.

The whole question of how does
one combine having children and
family life and a career is really the
one that I think comes to the heart of
the whole question, because I think
mature adults of either sex desire
the intimacy of marriage and the joy
of children. . . . In the case of women



this decision is supposed to limit her
almost totally to the care of these
children, although in fact a lot of
women who do not hold jobs can
spend a tremendous amount of time
away from the home either in
shopping or bridge playing or
volunteer activities, but they are sup-
posedly contributing — whereas a
woman who will maybe spend the
same amount of time or possibly even
less in a job is continually asked, "We
why do you want to take a job, don't
you have a job right there at home?"
And I think women are in many cases
unjustly saddled with guilt for spendin
the amount of time they do away from
home, just because it could result at
the end of the week in a pay check —
albeit very small in most cases.

• But even though some women ca
get out of the home and have a job or
do volunteer work, it is because they
have the means to hire another womai
to come in and take their place. So
they are not really becoming liberated
in any way; their liberation depends
on the oppression of another woman

. . . continuing the oppression.

LC: Well, this is continually said,
however, there are women who
tremendously enjoy taking care of
children, and I think that society need
these women. The fact that I also
enjoy working, of course, does not
mean that I don't enjoy taking care of
my children too. But when I'm away
from my children, I want someone
taking care of them that enjoys it,
and if she wants to do this as a
full-time job, why does this imply that
you are oppressing her? . . . just
as I don't think she who opts
voluntarily, freely, to stay home and
take care of her own children, is
being oppressed. I'm talking now
about the kind of woman who did wan
or does want to do something in
addition to taking care of those
children, and it's because of social
pressures, or other pressures from
her husband, that she is not able to
do this in addition. Now she is op-
pressed. . . .

• I think that's slightly distorting it
though. I mean the point I was
making is that it's always a woman,
it's never or seldom another man.
Why is there this distinction between



16



men and women? If we were all raised
equally, with the same human values
and sensitivities, I think there would
be just as many men who would want
to take care of children as their life
work as there would be women.

LC: Well, there are men who are
child psychologists. Look at someone
like Jerome Bruner, or someone on
television like Mr. Rogers who ob-
viously enjoys children more than
he enjoys anything else. Well, they can
doit.

• Yes, but that's very different from
going into someone's home for $25 a
week and taking care of their children.

LC: But not all women who do this
necessarily earn $25 a week either.
I do think that there should be a
dignity attached to taking care of
children.. . . and I think that once
the job of taking care of children does
have its full dignity, then perhaps you
will see more men doing it.

• That's what I'm studying for now,
and I want to work with kids. I'll
probably go into nursery school and
elementary education, and I don't
think I'll feel oppressed. I think it's a
great joy, kids; but when I do get
married I will probably go out and
work with other children and put my
child into a nursery or day care center
because I want to be able to work —
to differentiate between the two — then
I'll have something.

LC: You also can bring something
back to the children if you're outside
of the home all day. ... I can come
back to my children with a much
greater sense of ease and comfort
and joy when I have been spending
some hours outside the home doing
what I want to do than if I have
to continually spend my day respond-
ing to them. . . . As adults human
beings need many stimuli to continue
to develop and grow, and I think this
is as true of the mother as it is of the
father.

• Well, what I think Bunty was
saying was that having a woman as
a babysitter is reinforcing the whole
idea that a woman's place is taking
care of a child. And that's why you
don't have a society where taking
care of a child is a respected thing,
because it's women's work and women
are not respected. Anything a woman



does is fairly trivial. It has to do with
emotions. I think one of the reasons
there are so few men in grade school
and practically none in pre-school edu-
cation is because it's looked on as
woman's work. The smaller a child
is, which may come down to the more
it babbles, the less coherently it
speaks and stimulates an adult, the
less important it is, and therefore
the more important it is for that child
to be with a woman instead of a man.

LC: But actually one can, I think,
respond more creatively to childish
babbles if one has other things that
interest one. I couldn't spend all my
life just studying rennaissance litera-
ture, and I would feel the same way
about spending all my life worry-
ing about children and their diapers.
I think people who are solely one
thing, for example the man who
spends 18 hours a day being a doctor,
is a very dull man. Because of
society he is only able to do this one
particular thing, and I think you need
the richness of a personal life as well
as a career no matter what sex you are.

• I'm just afraid that a three-year-
old kid is so pure, it's just like a
little monkey, he picks up everything,
because he's really got nothing; he's
just got about 3 years behind him. . . .
And then he sees a woman come in,
and be his nursery school teacher.
Something happens. Something
conditions you into thinking women
should be nursery school teachers . . .
and women should be babysitters.

LC: Well I don't know. I know men
who have been very successful
kindergarten teachers . . . and a lot
of men now are becoming far more
interested in this whole business of
not studying children in labs but
actually going out and doing some-
thing for them in elementary education.

• I agree but it's hard for them
because that's one of the lowest
salaried jobs,

LC: That's true but you know
what's going to happen. When men
take over kindergarten jobs, if you
get enough men interested in it,
all of a sudden it's going to be too
important for women to do. . . .
There was just an article in the New
York Times Magazine about how



much smarter children are than you
think. . . you know what the ramifi-
cations are going to be. If they are
smart, they shouldn't just be home
with mommy. There should be some
man out there. Either that or mommy
will be told she can't of course do
anything outside of the home;
she's going to have to be putting
on continual light and sound films
for these children in order to stimu-
late them. ... It can go both ways
but either way, it's going to work to
the detriment of women. If the children
are decided to be too smart for their
mothers, then men will have to bring
them up; if it's decided that children
are so smart that women will have
to spend all this time with them,
then mothers will have to be educated
to be good mothers and they'll have to
spend every blessed minute stim-
ulating their children so they'll get
into Harvard when they're 10 years old.

• But as it stands now it's op-
pressing women and it's oppressing
men. I've taught nursery school, and
I've learned a lot about living by
watching life and by watching life
beginning. And I think about a lot of
things that men don't think about
and haven't learned to think about
simply because they haven't been
exposed to them — and that I see as
one of their greatest oppressions.
I'm interested in women's liberation
because I'm a woman; I'm interested
overall in human liberation. My
particular segment of it is Women's
Liberation, because that's my biology.

LC: I think we can use the term
oppression almost too casually. I
think you can say that men are
oppressed because they don't have
the contact with the children that
we think they ought to have. But I
also think that even beyond the terms
of oppression, one has to think about
what it is doing to our whole culture
to have the care of the young com-
pletely in the hands of one sex, and
then, as the child gets older, have it
almost totally given over to the other
sex — whether that child is a girl who'll
then grow up to marry a man and then
bring up his family, or whether she's
going to go to a school where the
teachers are male. In other words
this is the pattern, and I think if we



17



had more integration at all levels, if
you had more women in colleges,
more men in elementary education,
the total enrichment of not only this
new generation also of us as
adults would be far greater.

I think it's very hard for a man to
go out and earn his daily bread and
come back and talk with his wife
who's been at home all day. The
two of them live in totally different
universes. They have these children
that they've brought into the world
as their one point of common interest.
. . . but they don't really see these
children in the same way at all. I
think that one of the great things
that's happening among students
who are maybe ten years younger than I
am is that there is this tremendous
concern when people get married
that they are not going to let the
other one be either solely responsible
or solely burdened with one aspect
of life or the other. . . . Also there's
this other aspect of it which started
with no idea of women's liberation
at all. It came out of a totally different
tradition, but it has ramifications for
women's lib. That is this whole idea
of natural childbirth and the father
being with the mother in labor and
delivery; having the parents together,
not just at the moment of conception
but also when that child is born,
and this becomes a tremendous
experience for both of them. . . .

In our society we're separated for
all the major events of life. The only
time we invite people in is when we
get married. Then society is there.
But when you're born you're alone, and
when you die, you're often alone.
Death is relegated to the hospital and
birth is relegated to the hospital, and
these are the two focii of life, as far
as I can see it. Whenever people need
other people the most, they say well
now's the time for you to be alone.

I don't know that you can really tie
this in in any way to the total
women's liberation movement, but
I do think when you start talking
about women's liberation, you come
back to the point that we don't want
to be alone anymore. Why should we
be alone in the house with our children
all day? Why should we be alone
when we have that child? Why can't



we have the companionship that we
honestly thought we were getting when
we decided to get married. I don't
think that too many women when
they get married think of their married
life as being a lonely one. They
think: yesterday I was alone, now I
will be part of a group, but after the
honeymoon is over the man leaves
the house, and oftentimes, if he is a
successful man, you barely ever will
see him again until his retirement. . . .
If he's gotten used to being in the
house a little bit more, maybe even
his retirement won't be such a
shattering thing as it is for so many
men. . . .

• I think that the natural childbirth
and the Lemans method all tie in
very closely with women's liberation,
because for one thing, one of the
reasons that abortion isn't a personal
choice for a woman is that women
aren't making the laws — men are.
And one of the reasons I think men
are making laws like: there should
be no abortion, and only married
women can have birth control, is that
they're not at all involved in preg-
nancy or childbirth. They can feel
disassociated from a woman's
pregnancy. They can know intellec-
tually that they made this woman
pregnant, and yet it's no part of them
because they aren't at all involved. If
they go to classes while a woman is
pregnant, — they find out in these
classes what's happening and what
they can do all through the pregnancy,
and at the moment of birth and the
man is involved too. He comes to

feel almost pregnant. You can tell that
if you've seen a father who hasn't
been at all involved in his wife's
pregnancy or his child's birth and
compare him with a man who has
been. They're just two extremely
different human beings.

• But you can't forget, today we
live in a different time. It's just
beginning now that you can go into the
operating room. Society before said
no. My father never had the joy of
seeing my brother or myself born.
And you can't condemn them either.
You have to say, well I understand

but let's change it. You know I find
that too many people say; you're
wrong, and it's very difficult for






someone to say, you're right, I'm
wrong. If you say I understand but
let's change, you've got a far better
thing going for you.

LC: Well, we have a society, as all
societies are and will always be, that
has been somewhere and is going
somewhere else. You never can stop
the train and say now let's everybody
get off and put on a new, different
carload and start for a new destination.
We've got people of every age and
culture and background in this society
and we alone can't lead them or take
them. All we can do in the last analysis
is to express our ideas, hope
somebody is listening, and hope that
at least in our own personal lives and
the lives of those we're most intimately
associated with that something better
can emerge than what we've seen
emerge in the past. . . . Which is
not to say that everything that's gone
on before, or everything that's going
on now, is wrong. I think, as all people
who want to change things hope,
things can be improved.

• I think we get too caught up in the
idea of wrong and blame anyway.
Because the situation is wrong, that
means — if there are two people in
that situation — one of them has to be
the one that activated that wrong. I
mean — that's absurd. I don't think
there's any point in finding out who
was the one that did it, that made it
wrong, what is the point in that? It's
totally self-defeating. It's not at all
constructive. The point is to find out
what is wrong, analyze why it's wrong,
how it can be changed, and then go
ahead and change it.

LC: And start with the very youngest
in your society. I think this is where
any kind of a new idea is going to
have to start. When you have
daughters, when you have sons — and
it isn't just your daughters, your sons
too have to be talked to — these
things have to be explained to them.

• The sensitive male, you know
that man you find who can take
everything and never cry, I think that
has to change too. You know a man
can cry and a man can feel, and we
have to respect that fact.

LC: And he's a better man for it.

• Of course. He really is, I agree.



18



ALUMNAE GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY




Books:

Mexican Art

Miss Rosenda Cabrera '19

National Capitol Profile — in four volumes
Mrs. Edward L. Leahy '07

The New Movement in the Theatre
Class of 1942

Eight books about Pennsylvania
Philadelphia — South Jersey Lasell Club

Gift of Poetry and Literary Magazines
Mrs. Dorothy Burnham Eaton



Books shown on display here represent some of the
library acquisitions contributed by alumnae since the
first fund contribution by Lasell Alumnae, Inc.
was made for the opening of the new library building in
the spring of 1968. Included in the list below are the
names of groups or individuals who have added to
the growing number of new acquisitions, by giving
either funds for the purchase of new books or the books
themselves.



Contributions

Class of 1923

Mrs. Warren Spooner

Nancy Guttman '65
Mr. and Mrs. Rosen
Class of 1949

Mrs. David Hamel
Members of Class of 1937
Western Massachusetts Alumnae
Reunion Class of 1919
Lasell Alumnae, Inc.
Mrs. Calvin Carter '45
Reunion Class of 1948
Lasell Alumnae In Memory of

Mrs. Julia Craft Sheridan



$38.62

$100.00 for art slides (in addition to

years ago)
$5.00 for book
$100.00 to Library Fund



ibrary fund she started many



Contribution to Library Fund

$80.00 In Memory of Helen Hoyt

$10.00 In Memory of Harriet Wetsel Bryan '10

$200.00 In Memory of Their Deceased Members

$5,000.00

$25.00

$105.17

$25.00



19



CLASS NOTES



'18

Mid Cary Hill writes from Belgrade
Lakes, Maine: "11/19/70. My only
news is that Virginia Moore Starkey
'17 visited us here in June, and we
had a little reunion with Lydia Adams
Godsoe and husband and Barbara
McLellan McCormick and husband.
It had been 52 years since Gin had
seen Lydia and Barbara — so it was
quite a gab-fest!

"A letter from Grace Tredway
Davies says that she is still very
happy in her surroundings at the
Kappa Alpha Theta House, Delaware,
Ohio, where she is a housemother.
She hears from Marj Kunkel Brown
regularly. Helen Smith Stone has just
returned from visiting her daughter in
Indiana. Harriet Fera French and her
husband had a marvelous trip to
Hong Kong this fall. Ted and I started
out to drive to Texas, but en route
decided to fly to Rio de Janeiro — a
beautiful city. We took a side trip to
Brasilia — a most unusual and in-
teresting new capital.

"A real thrill for this old grand-
mother was when I was invited to sit
in the pilot's seat on the big Air
Force C-141 cargo plane as we flew
over the Amazon at sunset. That I
shall never forget!"



'19

Peg Houser Hamlin's recent post-
card, mailed in Darjeeling, India,
brought word that she planned to
spend the Thanksgiving holidays with
her son David and family in Wilming-
ton. The 1970 fall vacation trip in-
cluded Thailand, Singapore, Penang,
Bali, Borneo and Kashmir.

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Helen Moss Post, whose
husband died very suddenly in
November, 1970.



'25



The 45th Reunion of the Class of
1925 was celebrated on June 13th
with a dinner in the "Sirloin and
Saddle" dining room of the Marriott



Motor Hotel in Auburndale. This
handsome establishment is built on
the site of the old Totem Pole Ball-
room at Norumbega Park. Perhaps
some will remember it! Those present
were: Estelle L. Jenney, Helen P.
McNab (Mrs. Howard Willand); Bar-
bara Cushing (Mrs. George A.
Jenkins); Dorothy Hagadorn (Mrs.
Everett Taylor); Gertrude Kendall
(Mrs. Henry Lund); Marion Rice (Mrs.
Alf Severson); Madelyn B. Stover
(Mrs. Joseph McGarry); Alice Wilkins
(Mrs. John Moses) and Martha
Wilcox (Mrs. . Horace Hills). There
were glowing reports of the "Gab
Fest" held during the Saturday
afternoon reception at the new Li-
brary.

Do you remember the song — to the
tune of "Hello Dolly" — composed for
our 40th Reunion by Barbara
Jenkins? Well, Barbara did it again!
To the tune of "April Love" Barbara
put some beautiful words, for which
we shall all be very proud. We are
fortunate to have one of our mem-
bers so willing to share her talents.

Personally, I regret very much not
being able to attend Reunion, but
Henry and I had planned this year to
visit the Scandinavian countries. We
spent six wonderful weeks travelling,
via rented car, throughout Denmark,
Sweden and Norway. In Sweden
I renewed acquaintance with 22
cousins, visited Henry's birthplace
and the birthplaces of his mother and
father and my mother and father.

Unfortunately, many classmates
were unable to come to Auburndale
for Reunion, but we have received
some very wonderful letters, portions
of which I share with "you all":

Blanche D. Avery: This is my last
year of teaching in Poughkeepsie.
Perhaps I will be able to make the
next Reunion. So far our school
program plus transportation diffi-
culties have made it out of the ques-
tion.

Patty Berkson Hoover: The slogan of
our present life is "you only live
Twice". We are enjoying a happy and
full life, combined families of four
children and four grandchildren. I
have retired from my Chatham Col-



lege teaching; Jack, from his Good-
rich Chemical Company. I am still
very active in my music life — much
performing. We enjoy the small town
life (Hudson, Ohio), with proximity to
both Cleveland and Pittsburgh and
our families.

Jessie Matteson Ray: Everything is
well with me and mine. My son, Tom,
a Captain in the Air Force, has just
left for a two-year stint in Formosa.
My daughter and two children have
been visiting for the past two weeks.
In less than a month I am off to
England — to live for ten days in one
of the oldest colleges at Oxford while
attending an International Seminar on
European-Atlantic Unity. From there
I go to Moscow to join an "Inter-
national Delegation of American
Women for International Understand-
ing". This should prove most
interesting — with briefings by our
State Department and the co-opera-
tion of the Soviet Embassy. We shall
continue on to Yugoslavia and
Rumania. I do hope to see you all
again at a later Reunion.

Lois Bryant Warner: Our former Class
Secretary sends this word: "Sorry
the 1925 Class News has waned the
past year, but hope the Reunion will
bring forth many letters. Our days at
Lasell seem to bring back (to me) a
beautiful, clean, wholesome episode,
which helps me to try to 'accept'
today's dreary world. I feel sorry for
the women who want to be liberal-
ized and given the same opportuni-
ties as men. Perhaps my thinking is
not practical or progressive, but I
really believe that the female role is
to try to help improve each genera-
tion spiritually, intellectually and
culturally. Am truly sorry I shall not
be joining you at Reunion."
Emma Smith Quereau: Retired from
nursing after 40 years. Husband,
formerly employed by the U.S. Gov-
ernment, National Bureau of Stand-
ards, Boulder, Colo., is also retired.
Daughter Nancy is a registered nurse
on the staff of Whidbey Naval Hospi-
tal, Oak Harbor, Wash. Daughter
Sally Graham's lieutenant-husband is
stationed at Whidbey Navy Base;
grandson, Gregory Marc Graham,



20



was born 4/8/70. Happiness is hav-
ing old friends and new pull the
latch string to be welcomed by us or
Sandy, the friendly dog, or Miss
Sambo, our docile cat. Our beds are
much more comfortable than those at
the motels; the coffee pot is always
on! Do come to Boulder!

Letitia Shepard Stewart: Mr. Stewart,
a broker, real estate and insurance.
Thomas Dale Stewart, Jr., mechanical
engineer for Alcoa Equipment De-
velopment, Merwin, Pa. Letitia S.
Stewart, registered medical technol-
ogist, Western Pennsylvania Hospi-
tal, Pittsburgh.

Alberta Wight Wilson: Husband,
Harry McKay Wilson, M.D. Children,
Barbara Wilson Beck (Lasell '54) and
Harry McKay Wilson, 2nd.

Mary Saunders Houston: Husband,
George, recently made a full Pro-
fessor, Chairman of the Department
of Business in Department of Contin-
uing Education, Northeastern Univer-
sity. My daughter, an accredited
Religious Education Director, Unitar-
ian-Universalist Church, St. Peters-
burg, Fla., graduate of Vassar, Phi
Beta Kappa, now in process of
acquiring her M.A. at the University of
South Florida. Our granddaughter,
Karen Fenderson, 14, enters high
school in September '70.
Dorothy Cook Hagen: Husband,
Arthur O; son, Lawrence S. Reynal;
present occupation, housewife and
traveler.

Dorothy Keeler Stewart: Husband,
William Henry Stewart, and I are both
retired after he suffered a heart
attack. We have moved to New Har-
bor, Maine; keep busy with gardening
and restoring furniture; I always have
handiwork projects. My sister-in-law,
Mary Stewart Kominda (whom you
may remember as an Art instructor at
Lasell) lives next door. Sorry not to
be with you all in June — this will be
the first Reunion I have missed.
Christine Chamberlin Kenney: Had
hoped to make a trip East, but we are
in the process of selling our San
Rafael, Calif, home; feel we better sit
tight until this "project" is over.
Claire Stritzinger Daller: Have taught
school since 1948 when my husband



died; shall retire this June. Still live
in my old home in Norristown,
Penna., but am not sure what my
future plans will be. My daughter
lives in Westport, Conn., frequently
drive there to visit my two grandsons
and granddaughter. My married son,
member of a Philadelphia law firm,
lives in North Wales, Penna.

Ruth A. Buffington: Still very much
interested in my painting. Will be in
London for a time this summer; then
on to Southern France, headquarters
in Nice; some time in Paris before
returning to the West Coast late in
September. A covey of quail is com-
ing down the walk as I sit in my
Studio, so you can see the Carmel
Highlands (Calif.) is still country.
Sorry I will not be able to be with you
at the Reunion.

Ethel Clow Black: Own and operate,
with husband, Black's Paper Store
and Gift Shop in Wolfeboro, N.H.
Have two daughters, one married and
living in South Weymouth with seven
children. The other, Mary Dye, is As-
sociate Professor Psychiatric Nurs-
ing at Yale School of Nursing and
Clinical Specialist at the Connecticut
Mental Health Rehabilitation Center.
She will have her Ph.D. at the end of
this year. Had my 40th Reunion from
Massachusetts General Hospital three
years ago, so know how much fun
you will have. Shall be thinking of you
all.

Ruth Shepard Parmenter: Three
daughters, Janet, a 1956 Lasell
graduate, is now Mrs. George W.
Ellinwood, Jr. and lives in Wilton,
Conn.; Martha lives in Harrison, N.Y.;
and Linda, Lasell '64, now teaches in
Stuttgart, Germany. Sorry to miss
Reunion — my husband and I leave
for Europe on May 22nd; return in
late June.

Catherine Beecher Wood: Husband,
John LeRoy Wood, M.D.; Children,
Robert Beecher Wood, Carolyn Wood
Brox (Lasell '59) and Eleanor
Wood Litka. Am very involved in
church and community activities.
LeRoy is able to get away a little
more so we are enjoying vacation
trips in this country; last fall visited
England, Italy, Austria, Switzerland,



Germany, Holland and France. Our
son's wife is a Lasell girl — the former
Ann Douglass '59.

Margaret Gordon Ferguson: Hus-
band, C. Stewart Ferguson (de-
ceased); children, Cynthia Campbell
and Nancy Chapman. Would like to
say that I am coming to Reunion, but
June is a very full month for me.
Just can't believe this is our 45th, —
except for the white hairs and the
fact that I tire more easily, I feel no
older than when I was a Nut at Lasell.
Nancy returned to Lasell for her
Tenth Reunion last year; reported the
many changes on campus.
Eleanor Steele: Sorry not to join you
for our 45th, but anyone who is "re-
tired" knows that word is synony-
mous with "busy"! In a small town
a new-comer is grabbed up for every
job that comes along — they are all
fun but time-consuming. Leave on
May 10th for a vacation trip through
Canadian Rockies and a boat trip to
Alaska.

Mary Edna Hart Hoyt: Husband,
Walter Kenneth Hoyt; daughter,
Nancy Burnett, associate professor,
San Jose College; two grandchildren.
How good it would be to attend
Reunion and talk to all '25-ers. Be-
cause of health problems, it will be
impossible for me to travel, but my
love and best wishes will be with you
all for a gay get-together.
Martha Fish Holmes: Husband, Edgar
Miller Holmes, M.D.; children, Edgar
Miller Holmes, Stephen Vincent
Holmes, Ann Elizabeth Flatt. Son
Edgar will finish his long years of
training in Orthopedic Surgery on
July 1st; will open his office in Rut-
land, Vt. in the fall. He has a lovely
wife and baby boy, Todd. Steve is an
assistant director of Y.M.C.A. Camp
in Keene, N.H., where he lives with
his wife, Joan, and three children.
Ann married a Swiss boy who is a
biochemist and presently teaching
and doing research at M.I.T. She
spent four years in Switzerland, but
is now only five miles away in Welles-
ley. She has two little girls. Please
give my love to all '25-ers. Am sorry
not to be with you.
I think it was wonderful so many



21



returned the Reunion Information
Blank and with additional, detailed
news. How about the rest of you
girls? We'd love to hear from you;
we shall include the information in a
later issue of the LEAVES.

HELEN WAHLQUIST SHENNING

Class Secretary

Mrs. Henry R. Shenning

Route 3, Box 968

Fort Myers, Florida 33901



'29

The Evanston (III.) Hospital Cath-
erine King Fund for the Department
of Medicine has been established by
a gift from Charles W. King, husband
of the late Catherine Morley King.
The Chairman of the Board of Di-
rectors of the hospital said: "The
establishment of the Catherine King
Fund presents very exciting possibili-
ties for research in the important area
of respiratory diseases. I feel that
great strides can be made as a
result of this generous gift."



'35

From the Robert L. Reeves (Har-
riet Colwell): "Merry, Merry Christ-
mas — and we sincerely hope that
good health and much happiness
have been with you throughout the
year!

"At this time last Christmas, all of
the Reeves were preparing for
Nancy's ('66) and Gary's wedding — a
lovely affair! AND, as always (it
seems), 1970 has continued to be a
busy and eventful year for all of our
'Clan'.

"Alice (Lasell '66) set the pace
early — with a ten day trip to Hono-
lulu and Maui in February. Needless
to say — she had one of her best times
ever! Then a business trip to Europe
for RLR in March — Switzerland,
England and France. Spring vacation
— Harriet and Katy off to Lexington,
Ky. for a visit with daughter, Ann
(Reeves Schmid '58), Lindsey and
Robert. RLR to Switzerland and
England again in April for a week.



"Nancy finished her second year
of teaching in June — and Gary com-
pleted his residency at City Hospital.
Shortly after, they were off to Fort
McClelland in Anniston, Ala., where
(hopefully) Nancy and the new
Doctor-Captain will be stationed for
the two-year period required. Nos-
talgically, this is where RLR com-
pleted his six weeks of ROTC
training a "few" years ago — after his
Junior year in college.

"Alice, as vivacious as ever — and
serious about her retailing career
with O'Neil's (of the May Company
chain) here in Akron. Now an as-
sistant buyer after her first year and
doing a fine job! She and Barb Ake
have a new, lovely apartment,
Gloucister Court.

"In October, RLR off again for the
third trip to Europe — this time to
Switzerland, Italy, Germany and
France — and Harriet to Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla. for a short visit with her
sister Marge and Jack Godfrey.

"Harriet, continually busy all year
with her Hospital Board group and
the many 'affairs' of four daughters
and two sons-in-law!

"A wonderful 'surprise party' given
by all our girls (John and Gary) on
our 25th Anniversary, July 14 (Bastille
Day). Attended by many close and
long-standing intown friends — just
great!

"So now you know what's been
'going on' with the Reeves. All the
girls, the boys, Gary and John, and
the 'little people', Lindsey and
Robert, will be here for Christmas or
the day after.

"Yes, we have much to be thankful
for — and we wish much happiness for
you and your loved ones during
Christmas and the Holiday Season.
Our best wishes also throughout the
New Year!"



'39

Weddings:

Cora Pratt Gillett and Stan-
hope Adams on November 28,
1970 in Winnetka, III.



'40

How we envy Sibyl Lander
Fletcher's list of hobbies: "Trout
fishing in spring and summer, bird
and duck shooting in New Hamp-
shire and Canada — occasionally a
trip to Scotland or Spain; skiing in
Franconia and an annual trip to
Davos, Switzerland with the children."

Frances Britton Holden's hobbies
are centered about the activities of
her "all boy family". She spent four
days at the Boy Scout Jamboree in
Idaho; served as a canoe trip chap-
erone. Eldest son, Donald, a W.P.I,
graduate is a mechanical engineer;
Dick is an industrial arts major at
Bowling Green State; Edward and
Arthur attend Doylestown (Ohio) High
School.

Helen Bogert Home's vacation time
has taken her and her husband to
Northern Michigan, Wisconsin and
Minnesota "looking for the ideal
retirement spot"!

Jane Jones Freeman is a guidance
counselor in the Spring Valley (N.Y.)
school system. Jane is a former Dean
of Students at Rockland Community
College.

Dorothy Davis Williams is a docent
at the Denver Art Museum; enjoys
Symphony, operas, good theatre, and
accompanies her husband on many
business trips. Dottie's four children
are Richard, Melissa (Mrs. Donald J.
Igon, Jr.), Kenneth and Janet.

One of Miriam Tappan Gilbert's
favorite hobbies is her herb garden.
Miriam also makes art objects with
dried and pressed flowers as well as
with shells. Her special vacation
spots are Colorado, Florida and the
Bahamas.

Julia Rankin Sprague and family
are enjoying vacation time at their
log cabin in East Hartland, Conn.
Julia adds: "Bill and I work at clean-
ing up the land and hope to help
conserve the woods, wild flowers and
birds".

Jane Bartlett Wallace comments:
"My activities are most assuredly of
the household-neighborhood variety
— volunteer at the local hospital,



22



have worked with the Red Cross,
been active in our local civic as-
sociation, helped get us a local li-
brary, belong to the Garden Club and
the Ladies Literary Society. I hook
rugs, sew and occasionally take
painting lessons. Am interested in
antiques and collect them when pos-
sible for our 150-year-old farmhouse
in Warren, N.J".



'41

Weddings:

Karolyn Kemp Howe and

Donald T. Hillier, Esq. on

November 13, 1970 in Brattle-

boro, Vermont

Mary Hale Shaner is executive

secretary to the Dean of College of

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Bradley

University, Peoria, III. Jeanne Par-

tisch McCall is secretary to the

Director of Interscholastic Athletics

in Westchester, Dutchess and Putnam

counties, New York.

Sally Davis, daughter of Betty
Sayles Davis, was graduated in 1968
from Mt. Holyoke and is attending
Simmons Graduate School of Social
Work. Walter, Jr. is a member of
the Class of 1970 at Tufts University.

A year ago Kay Davis Almeida and
daughter Jane, a student at Bates,
enjoyed an early summer vacation in
Europe. Sons Bruce and John at-
tend Norwich University; John is a
member of the ski team.

Eleanor Flemming Donnelly is a
member of the Vermont Conference
Comm. of Ministerial Standing, and is
a director of the Swift Water Girl
Scout Council. The "family" hobby is
antiques, skiing and year-round vaca-
tioning at their Northern Vermont
cottage.

There is no more active a volunteer
in Wilmington, Dela. than Nancy
Burnham Henderer. She is president
of the Junior League, Chairman of
the Board of the Flower Market,
president of the Board of Managers
of the Home of Merciful Rest and
secretary of the Community Services
Council.

Mary Sawyer Philpott is secretary



to the program officer, Professional
Recruitment, of The Ford Foundation.
Mary writes: "As my family grew
older, my volunteer activities re-
volved less around theirs and more
on church and social service. My
husband and I have always been in-
terested in the restoration of antique
furniture and old homes. When we
lived in the Delta 'South' a few years
ago we spent many happy hours
ferreting out old plantation sites and
other relics of a romanticized bygone
era".



'42

Jane O'Rourke Gaffney has re-
quested a Lasell catalog for youngest
daughter, Betsy. Jane has four other
daughters: Karen Jayne, Judy, Janet
and Ellen. The Gaffneys live in Salem
— "our home faces the ocean, we
own a boat, try not to leave town in
the summer!"

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Marion Waterhouse Scott,
whose only son, Bill, a helicopter
pilot was killed in Vietnam in June
1968. Marion has two daughters,
Susan and Sheila.

Claire DeConto Trodella has
"identified myself with medical and
mental health organizations because
of my husband's profession (he is a
physician), and have become very
active in studying and working for
improvement in the area of mental
retardation."



'43

Margaret "Peggy" Brickett Sawyer
received her M.S. degree in Nursing
from Boston University in May 1970.
Peggy lives nearby in Natick; her
family include David, Susan, Lynda
and Mark.

Barbara Scott Wilson is a member
of the Barre (Vt.) Hospital Auxiliary
and enjoys working in the hospital
gift shop. She enjoys business trips
with her husband — they have traveled
to Puerto Rico, Canada, as well as
many cities in the States. The Wilson



Family (Scott, Meredith, Carol, Bar-
bara and Richard) avail themselves
of the Vermont vacation areas —
picnics and swimming in the sum-
mer; "enthusiastic skiing" in the
winter months.

Pat Bixby McHugo was a member
of the 1970 Vermont Golf Team and
competed in the Tri-State Tourna-
ment. Pat is a research assistant in
the Pathology Department of the Uni-
versity of Vermont Medical College.



'52

Weihnachten Greetings from The
Kurt Marschalls (Virginia Snedaker)
included a most handsome photo —
Kurt, Ginny, David and Laurie — and
a monthly summary of the family
activities i.e.: MARCH: Ginny went to
the States for a week to attend a
National Safety Conference in her
capacity as Safety Chairman of the
European PTA organization. MAY:
Early May saw us all in Luxembourg
for a few days visiting good friends.
. . . Ginny accompanied David's
sixth grade class on a two-day
Rhine River trip, staying overnight at
Bacarach Castle Youth Hostel ... it
took her a week to recover. JUNE:
Kurt took Ginny along to beautiful
Baden-Baden in the Black Forest
region of southern Germany for the
annual German Tire Manufacturers
Conference and formal ball. OCTO-
BER: Ginny back on her regular
routine . . . bowling, swimming, Red
Cross volunteer work at the base
hospital, German-American wives
activities and monthly theater . . .
Laurie joined a local swim club for
two nights a week training sessions
. . . David started target shooting
with a local gun club (air rifles) . . .
we saw our first American football
game in Fulda when two military
teams played on exhibition. DECEM-
BER: Holidays to be spent at home
this year . . . Summer of 1971 will
again bring us back to the U.S.A. for
vacation . . . May 1971 bring you all
that you desire! Until we meet
again. . . .



23





£= Cr^ >



~>^&hr



The Kurt Marschalls (Virginia Snedaker '52)



'53

The Class extends sincere sym-
pathy to Mary Kenney Flynn, whose
six-year-old daughter, Lisa, died on
December 2, 1970.



'54

Weddings:

Joan Blackburn Kaffel and



Eugene J. Crowley on October
11, 1970 in Milton, Mass.
Corinne Coyle Lydem has "had a
very busy two years. On June 29,
1969 we had our first baby, Patrick
Alan. On April 27, 1970 we moved to
our new home (7 Fitzpatrick Road,
Ansonia, Conn.); our second son,
Torrance Noel, arrived on June 13,
1970."



'55

Lasell Class of 1955 — fifteen years

later reports. . . .

Abby Alderman Kleinberg (Mrs.
Arthur G.), 138 Worth Ave., Ham-
den, Conn. 1 girl, 1 boy. Active in
Jewish Center sports program with
husband. Travels to Florida.

Jane Anderten Dekar (Mrs. J. V.), 832
Biscayne Terr., Endwell, N.Y. 2
girls, 2 boys. Homemaker.

Thelma Appel Kaplan (Mrs. Mark),
190 Lincoln Pkwy., Lowell, Mass.

1 girl, 1 boy. Part-time Medical
Secretary, Tennis, bridge, travel,
does enameling on copper.

Joan Baker Cornell (Mrs. Richard A.),
1388 Crittendon Rd., Rochester,
N.Y. 2 boys. Back in school for
degree in Social Work. Was in re-
tailing and dress buying.

Ann Bottjer O'Donnell, (Mrs. Robert
P.), 66 Engelke Ave., Huntington
Station, N.Y. 1 girl, 2 boys. Bowl-
ing, bridge, girl scout leader.

Judy Bowen Drews (Mrs. John G.),
25851 Estacada Dr., Los Altos Hills,
Calif. 3 boys. Sewing, gardening,
bridge. "Have done back-packing
in the Sierra Nevadas".

Nancy Bray Dwyer (Mrs. John), 7
Mary Ann Rd., Manchester, N.H. 3
boys. Teacher grade 2. Now an
outdoor gal camping each sum-
mer.

Sandra Brideau Buckley (Mrs. Her-
bert), 44 Argonne St., Berlin, N.H.

2 girls, 2 boys. Went back to Lasell
for nursing. Active in Mormon
Church. Hopes to enter Mental
Health field.

Jean Bush Jordan (Mrs. Richard H.),
R.D. #1, Neshanic, N.J. 1 girl, 2
boys. Working on degree in educa-



tion. Will be going with husband
to Brussels, Belgium.

Jacqueline Cain Sheilds (Mrs. John
J.), 7 Squanto Rd., Woburn, Mass.
3 girls, 1 boy. Sewing, Den Mother.

Sue Cassan Jones (Mrs. John), 13
Twin Brooks Rd., Fairport, N.Y. 1
girl, 1 boy. Teacher grade 2.
Travels to Puerto Rico, Grand
Bahama Island, Ireland, Florida,
California. Golf and sailing.

Carolyn Chapin Snyder (Mrs. Edward
R.), 115 Kenmore Dr., Long-
meadow, Mass. 2 girls, 3 boys.
"Have taken up skiing, sailing our
Sunfish; traveled to Florida. Enjoy
sewing, crewel and bridge".

Mimi Choi Cooper (Mrs. Stanley W.),
20 Flintlock Rd., Madison, Conn.
1 girl, 1 boy. Housewife, Member
of Conn. Guild of Weavers, passed
apprentice rating.

Suzanne Clark, 110 Evans Rd., Brook-
line, Mass. Assistant Librarian at
Lasell. Planning vacation trip to
England, Scotland and Holland.

Rhea Cooney Simonds (Mrs. Ronald
D.), 173 Overlook Rd., Arlington,
Mass. 1 girl. Housewife, sewing.

Anne Cranton Mix (Mrs. Lyman W.),
28 Sylvester Rd., Natick, Mass. 3
girls. Part time floral designer.
Busy in Women's Club, sewing,
teaching flower arranging. Goes
camping in summer.

Sally Cranton Nolan (Mrs. Robert
H.), 1 Fairview Ave., Natick, Mass.
1 girl, 1 boy. Works in editorial
dept. of Investment Advisory firm.
Church work, Eastern Star, camp-
ing.

Marlene Crompton Brodmerkle (Mrs.
Donald), 22 Gary Circle, Westboro,
Mass. 1 boy. Secretary.

Nancy Curtis Kern (Mrs. George W.),
7616 Harshmanville Rd., Dayton,
Ohio. 2 girls, 4 boys. Husband,
Major USAF. Has lived in N.Y.,
Tenn., Ga., Ariz, and Okinawa.

Carole Darsky Giller (Mrs. Stuart W.),
891 Westgrove Rd., Akron, Ohio
1 girl, 2 boys. Housewife.

Marion Domber James (Mrs. Perry
L), R.D. #1, Box 22, Milford, N.J.
1 girl, 1 boy. Part time farmer and
substitute teacher. Has 90 acre
farm. Raises chickens, goats, all



24



their own meat and vegetables.
Active in 4-H and Girl Scout
Cadette Troop.

Darrylle Donahue Curran (Mrs. Ed-
ward G.), 58 Windsor Rd., So.
Weymouth, Mass. 2 girls, 1 boy
plus twin boy and girl. Boating
enthusiast.

Mary Alice Everett Yurko (Mrs. Mal-
vin), 14 Deerfield Rd., Whippany,
N.J. Physical Therapist at Morris-
town Rehabilitation Center.

Priscilla Fenton Abercrombie (Mrs.
John E.), 12 Phyfe Rd., Fairfield,
Conn. 2 girls, 1 boy. Housewife.
Has lived in Mass., N.J., and N.Y.

Patricia Friberg Karnedy (Mrs.
George M.), 7716 Brookshire Dr.,
Des Moines, Iowa. 1 girl, 3 boys.
Says she is now a confirmed
Mid-Westerner.

Iris Gabel Bellings (Mrs. Herbert),
Box 352, Oceanside, N.Y. 2 girls, 1
boy. P.T.A. president, gardening,
Temple activities.

Elaine Gaysunas Coppinger (Mrs.
Joseph), 129 Clairmont Dr., Wood-
cliff Lake, N.J. 1 girl, 2 boys. Has
taken trips to Calif, and the
Bahamas. Bridge and sewing.

Nancy Goodman Cobin (Mrs. Howard
C), 26 Walcott Ave., Andover,
Mass. 1 girl, 2 boys. Active in
Temple work, N.E. Home for Little
Wanderers, den mother.

Mary Lee Gowdy Belcourt (Mrs.
Noel J.), 78 Bette Court, R.D. #2,
Vernon, Conn. 4 boys. Church
work, antiquing and refinishing
furniture.

Jane Grey Milne (Mrs. George D.),
125 Nelson St., Barre, Vt. 2 boys.
Busy with community activities,
skiing, snowmobiling. Visited Pat
Friberg in Des Moines.

Susan Gray Lichtenstein (Mrs. Alan
C), 111 Millbrook Rd., Hamden,
Conn. 2 boys. Spend winters ski-
ing. On Board for Symphony and
also Child Welfare Association.

Ethel Griffin Browning (Mrs. Charles
C), 10 Spencer Lane, Warren,
N.J. 2 girls, 1 boy. Enjoys water
skiing, fishing, bowling and is a
Girl Scout leader.

Judith Gushue Blythe (Mrs. Larry L.),
1559 Milowyn Place, Atlanta, Ga.



1 girl, 1 boy. Travel Representa-
tive for American Express. Has
traveled through Europe, Hawaii
and Mexico.

Carolyn Hall Browning (Mrs. Robert
J.), 22 Shady Ave., Greenville,
Penna. 1 girl, 1 boy. Homemaker.

Genevieve (Gigi) Harold, 15 Rock-
ledge Rd., Hartsdale, N.Y. Secre-
tary — NBC — N.Y. Traveled to
Mexico City and Acapulco. Skiing
in Austria and Switzerland.

Marcia Harrington McCarthy (Mrs.
John S.), 12 Arlington Rd., Mel-
rose, Mass. 3 girls. Bridge, rug-
making, Mother's Club, children's
activities.

Ann Harris Hughes (Mrs. Donald E.),
336 Concord Rd., Bedford, Mass.
1 girl, 2 boys. Homemaker.

Anne Hartnett Lohnes (Mrs. Walter
H.), 24 Winslow Road, Riverside,
R.I. 2 girls, 1 boy. Past president
of Lasell Alumnae Club. Belongs
to swimming and golfing clubs.

Diane Hendley Cooper (Mrs. Gordon
N.), 38 Musket Trail, Simsbury,
Conn. 1 girl, 2 boys. Housewife.
Enjoys bridge, garden club and
sailing.

Charleen Herrling Smith (Mrs. Theo-
dore N.), 2917 Henneberry Rd.,
Pompey, N.Y. 2 girls, 1 boy. Hobby
is restoring 1803 farm house.
Chartered sailboat through Grene-
dines. San Francisco trip.

Ann Heyman, 321 East 71st St.,
N.Y.C. Platform Assistant at bank.
Trips to Hawaii, Florida, Bermuda,
Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands.
Loves gourment cooking.

Janet Holmes Murphy (Mrs. Richard
K.), 178 Garth Rd., Scarsdale,
N.Y. 1 girl. Community and church
work. Travel business part-time
from home. Plans trip to Europe.

Florence laione Kelly, 10 Briar Circle,
Green Brook, N.J. 3 girls and
identical twin boys. Husband in-
terested in drug abuse program.

Barbara Judd Ozinga (Mrs. Bernardo
E.), 2820 Windsor Terr., Oklahoma
City, Okla. 2 girls, 1 boy. Involved
with PTA, church, Girl Scouts and
League of Women Voters.

Carol Kenneally Gardner (Mrs.
George T.), 5211 Wendover Rd.,



Yorba Linda, Calif. 2 boys. Taking
lessons in oil painting. President
of Southern Calif. Lasell Club.
Hospital work and golf.

Eunice Kerkins Monticone (Mrs.
Silvio A.), 1554 Rose Anna Dr., San
Jose, Calif. 1 girl, 3 boys. Studying
to be elementary teacher. Sight-
seeing in 30 states cross-country
trip.

Beverly Kimball Lamburn (Mrs.
Richard H.), 47 So. Chelmsford
Rd., Westford, Mass. 2 girls, 1 boy.
Church work, Sunday school
teacher, gardening, refinishing an-
tiques. Works part-time.

Mary Lee Klipper Singer (Mrs.
Robert W.), 604 So. Main St., New
City, N.Y. 1 girl, 3 boys. Main in-
terest concerns raising and show-
ing Saint Bernards. Swims a mile a
day, handball, yoga, bowling and
modern dance. Spare time knits
and crochets!

Lois Kuhn Hopson (Mrs. Charles E.),
2 Forest Park Ave., Larchmont,
N.Y. 1 girl, 1 boy. Lives in sailing
and tennis-playing community. Vol-
unteer at Jr. League shop.

Sandra Lally Hovey (Mrs. Ronald),
P.O. Box 73, Encino, Calif. 1 girl.
Private secretary. Bought a Cal-25
sail boat to cruise Calif, coast, and
race. Golf, skiing, clubs.

Judie Lanese Karazulas (Mrs. Charles
P.), 35 Wedgewood Dr., Easton,
Conn. 2 girls, 2 boys. Family loves
to fish Long Island Sound. Active
in Dental Auxiliary (husband is
dentist), bridge.

Nancy Legare Vojtech (Mrs. James),
319 Napoleon St., Playa Del Rey,
Calif. 1 girl, 1 boy. Widowed — now
remarried and enjoys camping in
tent trailer. Took Canyon Tour; this
year to Wisconsin and Yellowstone.

Patricia Lee Oswald (Mrs. Walter J.),
151 Wickham Way, Norwood, Mass.
Secretary. Enjoys skiing in winter
and yachting in summer out of
Charles River Yacht Club and Cat-
aumet. Florida trip.

Nancy Lincoln Martin (Mrs. Hugh
M.), 27 Bowden Dr., Huntington
Station, N.Y. 2 girls, 1 boy. Free
lance artist with own studio, active
in scouting, Arts Council, church



25



and Heart Association.
Barbara Lindsay Ray (Mrs. Donald
E.), Plummer St., Kennebunk, Me.

1 girl, 1 boy. Distributor of snow-
mobiles. Active in Brownies, Public
Health Board, church. Trip to
Bermuda.

Gertrude Little Young (Mrs. Frederick
T.), 51 Cole St., Beverly, Mass. 3
girls. Elementary teacher grade 6.

Joanna Loiacono Keller (Mrs. Hank
S.), 1772 N. Buchanan, Pomona,
Calif. 1 girl, 1 boy. Was IBM sec-
retary. Family plans to go into
mission field with Indians in North-
west.

Shirley MacDonald Biamonte (Mrs.
Robert L.), 6 Boulder Dr., Burling-
ton, Mass. 2 girls, 2 boys. At home.

June McLaughlin Lombino (Mrs.
Robert J.), 81 Apawamis Ave., Rye,
N.Y. 4 girls, 1 boy. Homemaker.
Recently moved into new home.

Anne Merchant Davis (Mrs. John G.),
Off Townsend Harbor Rd., Lunen-
burg, Mass. 1 girl, 1 boy. Gradu-
ated Boston University.

Carol Merwin Robinson (Mrs. Henry
A.), Haddam Quarter Rd., Durham,
Conn. 1 girl, 2 boys. Involved
in community activities, church,
Planned Parenthood, raising pon-
ies. Trip to Europe.

Jean Mills Einarson (Mrs. Magnus J.),
15 Sherwood Dr., Westford, Mass.

2 girls, 2 boys. Skiing, bridge,
sailing. Recently moved into new
home — active in Newcomers.

Millie Monahan Regan (Mrs. Thomas
L.), 25 Dunbarton Rd., Belmont,
Mass. 4 girls, 1 boy.

Valerie Montanez Randolph (Mrs.
John W.), 316 Country Club Drive,
Atlantis, Fla. 3 girls, 1 boys. Mar-
ried to a physican. Medical con-
ventions in Hong Kong, Tokyo,
Alcapulco and Madrid. Tennis, golf,
hospital volunteer.

Joan Murano Swanson (Mrs. Philip),
moved recently to 168 Sackett Rd.,
Glen Coe 3, Avon, N.Y. President
of Mothers Club — active in com-
munity affairs. 1 girl, 1 boy.

Linda Nolin Ahern (Mrs. Robert), 106
Hemlock St., Arlington, Mass. 3
girls. Brownie troop leader. Likes
to travel to mountains and lakes



around Sunapee, New Hampshire.

Lucinda Nolin Johnson (Mrs. Warren
A.), 222 Blue Rock Rd., So. Yar-
mouth, Mass. 3 step-sons. Knitting,
fishing, gardening, boating. Trips to
Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Spain and
Mexico.

Joanne Novello McRae, 7494 Sedge-
field Ave., San Ramon, Calif. 2
boys. Husband Navy Jet Pilot.
Keeps busy while he's on tour with
gardening, scouts and boys' activi-
ties.

Adeline Neusner Bain (Mrs. Paul),
43 Marlborough St., Lowell, Mass.
2 boys, 1 girl. Moved into new
home. Traveled to Las Vegas, San
Francisco and Honolulu.

Marion Nutter Bredehoft (Mrs. Bruce
B.), 3 Knollwood Dr., Dover, Mass.
2 boys. Past President and current
Board Member of Lasell Alumnae
Inc. Trips to Midwest, Florida and
Bahamas. Courses in ceramics and
handcrafts.

Beverly O'Brian Perry (Mrs. Arthur
W.), 9936 Chateau Dr., Baton
Rouge, La. 1 boy. Afflicted with
Nephritis — now dependent on kid-
ney machine. Has worked as
modeling director, fashion com-
mentator.

Sandra Oechler Engler (Mrs. Robert),
630 Holly Hill Dr., Brielle, N.J. 2
girls, 1 boy. Active in water sports
and boating. Tennis, bowling, Girl
Scout leader and choir mother.

Arlene Pariseau Cairns (Mrs. George),
7 Hawthorne Circle, Andover, Mass.
1 girl, 3 boys. Part-time job with
Federal Census Bureau. Involved
in Little League. Trip to Nassau.

Nancy Peirce Driscoll (Mrs. John H.),
109-14 Ascan Ave., Forest Hills,
N.Y. 2 girls, 2 boys. Church and
school activities. Vacations on
Cape Cod.

Elizabeth Reynolds, 915 West End
Ave., New York City. Registered
nurse. Travels each year to out-of-
the-way places — Iceland, Nepal
and Grand Canyon via raft.

Maggie Roth Wells (Mrs. James B.),
3431 Landen St., Lynchburg, Va.
1 girl, 1 boy. Just opened a
"Sample Dress Shop". Loves to
knit, golf and go camping. Trip to



California.

Anita Royer Martin (Mrs. Robert S.),
11 Hilltop Dr., W. Hartford, Conn.
3 girls. Sunday school teacher,
Girl Scouts, Brownies, Church
Board, Head Start program and
hospital board.

Susan Savage Klinedinst (Mrs. R. W.),
408 Pembroke Rd., Bala Cynwyd,
Penna. 1 girl, 1 boy. Teaching pre-
school art at YMCA, making craft
items for Boutique shops and giv-
ing puppet shows.

Susan Schofield Jeffrey (Mrs. James),
1720 Commercial St., Weymouth,
Mass. 2 girls. Part-time teacher —
also Drug Counsellor. Golf, tennis,
swimming. Former president So.
Fla. Alumnae Club.

Barbara Schuster Klinefelter (Mrs.
John W.), 26 Park Lane, Darien,
Conn. 1 girl, 1 boy. Husband edu-
cational consultant and teacher
working on 6th year degree. Ski-
ing.

Druscilla Sen Watson, 8209 Rhea
Ave., Reseda, Calif. 3 girls. B.A.
(Sociology UCLA). Travels to
Hawaii, Canada, Orient, Mexico.
Sewing and Jade collecting.

Joan Shanley Verdile (Mrs. Raphael
M.), 848 Sixth Ave., Troy, N.Y. 3
girls, 1 boy. Husband is radiologist.
Lived 3 years in Germany. Fixing
up older 12-room house. PTA and
Symphony Auxiliary.

Susan Sherrill Seggel (Mrs. Lawrence
R.), 1108 Big Cove Rd., S.E.,
Huntsville, Ala. 2 girls, 1 boy.
Candlemaking and sewing. Worn-
ens Stock Club and figure skating
club. Arts and crafts projects.

Carole Smith Handler (Mrs. Richard
W.), 94 Concord St., Waterbury,
Conn. 2 boys. Active in Temple,
YMCA Swim Team Parents Group,
ORT. Travels to Florida, Georgia
and Minnesota.

Caroljean Somers Irrgang, 609
Francis Dr., Pensacola, Fla. 1 girl.
Secretary to VP of local bank. Girl
Scouts, Grey lady with Red Cross.

Joy Stewart Rice (Mrs. Francis J.),
227 Melrose St., Auburndale, Mass.
1 girl, 2 boys. Girl Scouts, League
of Women Voters, VP of Boston
Alumnae Club. Son attends Lasell



26



Nursery School.

Gail Swanson Rees (Mrs. Malcolm
C), Qrts. 51, Naval Air Station,
Pensacola, Fla. 2 boys. Husband
USN. Housewife.

Mary Sweenor Ruggieri (Mrs. Frank),
18 Buttercup Rd., Cranston, R.I. 1
girl, 2 boys. Part-time work in
candy business and nursery
school. Den Mother, Brownies and
Phys. Ed. class.

Elizabeth Taylor Pratt (Mrs. Walter
D.), 20 Samuel Rd., Spring Valley,
N.Y. 1 girl, 2 boys, kindergarten
teacher, Brownies, teaching Sun-
day School, camping, sewing. Trip
to Florida.

Susan Thomas Wiard (Mrs. Robert
C), Quarters 113-B, Fort Wads-
worth, Staten Island, N.Y. 1 girl, 1
boy. Husband Commanding Officer,
President OWC, Brownie leader.
Traveled U.S. and Far East, sewing
and crewel.

Mary Jane Tidman Bridges (Mrs.
Robert G.), 18505 11th Ave. N.,
Wayzata, Minn. 1 girl, 1 boy. Horse-
back riding (own 2 horses), sailing
sunfish and singing in Chorale of
100.

Margaret Tomlinson Morrow (Mrs.
James C), 340 Pleasant St.,
Marshfield Hills, Mass. 2 girls.
Raise and show Labrador Re-
trievers. Swim meets with children.
Camping and riding own horse.

Barbara Travis Hendrick (Mrs. Roe),
5 King Phillip Path, Hingham, Mass.

1 girl, 2 boys. Boating, plan to go
to Star Island, N.H. and Nantucket.
Tennis and bridge.

Susan Twichell Nelson (Mrs. Alan),

2 Freeman Rd., Hanover, N.H. Hus-
band teaches at Dartmouth.
Teaches skiing, plays golf and
bridge and mends clothes! 3 girls
and 1 boy.

Martha Walker Rolfe (Mrs. Walter H.),
65 Shelley Rd., Elk Grove Village,
III. 2 girls. Part-time teacher aide.
Active in church and school. Trips
to New England. Sewing.

Mary Waterman Weaving (Mrs. Wil-
liam F.), 11 Locust St., Branford,
Conn. 3 girls, 1 boy. L.P.N., garden-
ing and knitting.

Marilyn Valter Maclay (Mrs. John C),



426 Blackstone Ct., Walnut Creek.
Calif. 2 boys. Part-time secretary.
Family trips to Bermuda, Virgin
Islands, Hawaii, and Virginia.

Adrienne Vitali Stewart (Mrs. Don-
ald), 10790 Wanda Lane, Denver,
Colo. 1 girl, 1 boy. Skiing. Trips to
Las Vegas and San Francisco.
Active in civic affairs.

Roberta Flint Reinert (Mrs. Russell
R.), 1 boy. Husband minister. Both
are missionaries; plan to go to
Peru in 1971.

Ruth Birch Bastis (Mrs. Thomas E.),
recently moved to 123 Anahola St.,
Honolulu, Hawaii. While living in
Minnesota, Ruth and 3 sons en-
joyed skiing, snowmobiling and
furniture refinishing.

Sandra Brideau Buckley has a son,
David Aaron, born on September
20, 1970.



'56

Weddings:

Barbara C. Foster and Bernard
F. Wickwire on September 12,
1970 in Rochester, N.Y.

Born: To Gail Frank Wells a daugh-
ter, Whitney Ann, born July 28,
1970, adopted August 14, 1970.



'57

Weddings:

Angelica Poleway and Joseph
Papke on September 26, 1970
in Augsburg, Germany.



'58

Born: To Nan Sparks Hunter, an
adopted son, Eric Addison, on
August 6, 1970.

To: Lasell LEAVES

I just thought it's been entirely too
long since I wrote my news and gave
my current address, so here I am.

Walt (who is in real estate develop-
ment) and I have been living in St.
Croix, Virgin Islands for almost four
years. Our children, Brian (6) and
Michelle (5) live a wonderful outdoor



life in our all-year climate. I have a
part time secretarial job mornings.
We love it here as long as we can get
off "the rock" frequently and island
hop or get to the States.

I was happy to see my Lasell
roommate, Debby Hestwood, in New
York City in August. She has a good
job in the fashion department of J.
Walter Thompson. Debby looks just
great.

Our address: Star Rt. 00864, Peli-
can Cove, Christiansted, St. Croix,

V.I. 00820.




and a happy new y ear •



Malcolm and Stuart Rees — sons of Gail
Swanson Rees '55



27




Scoff and Christopher Johnston — sons of Susan Ladd
Johnston '60



Carole Bartholomew Desseau '58
October 5, 1970

Patricia Graff Willoughby writes
from Alabama: "Am enjoying a
career of sorts as an applied mathe-
matics assistant and find it not in-
compatible with raising three daugh-
ters. This field of endeavor would
have been a surprise prediction — ten
years ago — but I enjoy the chal-
lenge." Patricia's address: 302 Beard
Street S.W., Decatur, 35601.

'60

Born: To Susan Ladd Johnston a
third son, Kent Emerson, on
February 27, 1970.

'61

Engagements:

Eileen F. Stack to Thomas R.
Fowler, Jr.

Born: To Valerie Duval Pettinicchi,
first child, a son, Duane Paul,
on June 26, 1970.
To Marie Pelargonio Hall, first
child, a son, Philip Walker, Jr.
on September 16, 1970.

'62

Born: To Lynne Andrews Scielzo, a
second child, second daughter,
on September 29, 1970.



To Linda DiFazio Lech, a
second child, first daughter, on
November 11, 1970.

Sheila Lane Murphy admits: "The
only office I've held since gradua-
tion is that of wife and mother!
Interests and volunteer — the same
— wife and mother".

Reva Rovner Lahnstein has become
interested in the field of mental
retardation. During the summer she
participated in a camp program at
the AHRC Educational Center,
Brookville, Long Island.

Nancy Martin Phelps writes: "Before
the children came (Barbara 3;
Deborah 2) I served as Education
Advisor at an Air Force base in
Germany and helped my husband
work his way through graduate
school".

Marilyn Pierce Elia's "interest in
singing has always been upper-
most. Church choirs, local groups
and in a local production of my
church, I was Annie Oakley in
'Annie Get Your Gun'. I have also
sung at several weddings".

Barbara Rozomofsky Winthrop: "I
participate in our Synagogue activi-
ties and have taught Sunday
School. Am particularly active in
the Junior Service League where
we focus mainly on civic affairs.
We are interested this year in ex-
panding our library facilities. Our
fund raising project was a three-
night production of the 'King and
I' — I was a behind-the-scenes as-
sistant".

Ronna Kosowsky Kravitz is a mem-
ber of the Board of Directors of Mt.
Sinai Hospital Women's Auxiliary,
and serves as Financial Secretary
to the West Hartford chapter of the
National Council of Jewish Women.

Judith Wright Levins is a teller at
the First National Bank of Spring-
field, Vermont; June Bishop Eng-
man, a salesman with Theo. Mayer
Realtors in Cincinnati; and Judith
Morris, a secretary at the Boston
office of the Gillette Company.

Beth Tangarone Kolehmainen re-
ceived her B.S. from the Eliot-
Pearson School in 1964. She



lived in San Francisco for two
years, taught kindergarten; in New
York City she taught in the Head
Start program for two years; con-
tinued in that program in Chicago,
and is now a part-time consultant
at the Educational Workshop in
New York City.



'63

Weddings:

Gail A. Regan and Paul B.
Martin in October 1970 in Wal-
pole, Mass.

Born: To Nancy Anderson Chapman,
a second child, first son, Dana
Reed, on April 6, 1970.
To Dorothy Andler Silber, a
third child, second son,
Andrew Marc, on September
27, 1970.

To Carol Schaller Rooney, a
son, Brian James, born Sep-
tember 20, 1970, adopted Oc-
tober 21, 1970.

Mildred Panetti Gibson spent three
summers on the Navajo Indian
Reservation in Arizona. Her hus-
band, a dentist, is affiliated with
the Public Health Service.

Barbara Noorigian Meehan is "getting
involved in suburban living in Sud-
bury, Mass. I have been active in
the Newcomers Club and in the
local YWCA swimming program".

Dorothy Andler Silber writes: "After
graduating from Lasell, I worked
for three years as a Medical Sec-
retary. Now my time is taken up
with caring for my husband, chil-
dren (Shari and Kenneth) and our
home".

Joan Hosmer Griffith is currently
serving as assistant secretary of
the Elliot Hospital Junior Associ-
ates in Manchester, N.H.

1963 Secretaries include: Marcia
Wightman Sansoucy with the
William A. McClennan and Associ-
ates in Woodstock, Conn.; Lenore
Silvestro Neuweg with Kenneth H.
Green Company, Boston; and Carol
Sneliing, Interactive Data Corpora-
tion in Waltham.



28



Barbara Freer Urquhart is a staff
nurse at Massachusetts General
Hospital; Arlene Glauber Litchfield
is an instructor of Medical Assisting
Program at the Career Academy,
New York City.



'64

Engagements:

Joanne Blaine to Charles A.
Waleik

Weddings:

Jane E. Leonard and George
W. Wilcox on November 21,
1970 in Fall River, Mass.

Born: To Kathleen Hayes Panos, a
third son, Michael Hayes, on
October 21, 1970.

Donna Sue Whiteley, secretary at
the McDonogh School, McDonogh,
'Md., is an ardent scuba diver. She
spent an early spring vacation in
Mexico, where she enjoyed the
Pacific waters.

Karen Asklar Grow writes from
65-P Millside Manor, Delran, N.J.:
"Being on the move so frequently I
have not been able to get involved in
community projects. Currently I am
an active member of the Jaycees;
have chaired several club projects.
My husband and I are avid skiers; I
enjoy making my own clothes and
sew for the children — Geoffrey and
Kimberly."

Elizabeth Daigneau, R.N., is affili-
ated with the Shriners Burn Hospital,
Boston; Barbara Green is a social
worker at New York's Roosevelt Hos-
pital.

Lynn Brown Kargman is advertis-
ing manager of the Harvard Univer-
Isity Press in Cambridge; Alison
Harrington Rustigian is a service
representative for the New England
Telephone Company.

Gale Hutzler Roberts, a first grade
i teacher, reports a new address:
fWestgate Apartments, Clinton, N.C.
.She and her husband spent Christ-
ffrias 1969 at Paradise Island in the
Bahamas.



'65

Weddings:

Patricia Hebert and Lt. Robert
P. Brown, USAF in September
1970 in Estes Park, Colo.

Linda Garber Cohen is enjoying
a new home — 9 Brooks Terrace,
Swampscott, Mass.; even more is en-
joying her young daughter, Kaurie
Ellen, born March 27, 1968.

Andrea Abbott Carlson and hus-
band have recently moved to Glas-
tonbury, Conn.; they are both ex-
tremely interested in conservation;
"hope to put this interest to good
use in our new community."

Louise Schwartz Rose admits:
"Working as librarian in one of
Boston's oldest and largest law
firms is extremely rewarding, and has
prompted me to continue my studies
for a master's degree in Library
Science."

Donna Kane Audibert is a mer-
chandise clerical at Bernard's in
Plymouth, Mass.; Treena Belsky
Sokol, a model and Boutique man-
ager, of The Shop for Pappagallo in
Shaker Heights, Ohio.

Judith Cohen Miller is a tech-
nician at Peter Bent Brigham Hospi-
tal; Lee Gissler Andera, supervisor
of the cytology laboratory at the
Bridgeport (Conn.) Hospital; Ann
Mattioli is a case worker for the
Connecticut State Welfare Depart-
ment in Hartford.

Eleanor Staniland is manager of
the Elaine Powers Figure Salon,
Buffalo, N.Y.; Linda Wilson Olson, an
analyst with Travelers Insurance of
Hartford; Linda Desnoes, a claims
supervisor at Liberty Mutual in Lyn-
brook, N.Y.

Joan Brignano is a secretary at
Global Associates, Honolulu; Susan
Warnick Krueger, at IBM Corpora-
tion, White Plains; and Sibyl Ryan
Piccone is an executive secretary at
Lord & Taylor, New York City.

In the public school teaching field:
Joan Allen Papazian, Southboro,
Mass.; Wendy Myers Winer, Green-
wich, Conn.; Cynthia Hopkins To-
nello, Burlington, Mass.; and Linda
Domscheit Schwarz, Fairfax, Va.



Roberta Krasnow Trallach has re-
cently resigned after two years of
teaching in the Maiden School Sys-
tem. She is now enjoying a new
home at 337 Winter Street, Brockton,
Mass.

Janet Perkins Thompson is com-
pleting work for a degree in Ele-
mentary Education at Fitchburg State
College. She and her husband are
active in the Plymouth Yacht Club
and are members of the Harvard His-
torical Society.

Dorothy Esperian, a second grade
teacher in Millis, Mass., has been
elected by the Annual Convention of
the Armenian Youth Foundation of
America to serve on the Central
Executive of the organization. The
A.Y.F. serves the entire United States
and Canada, and maintains programs
in education, and athletics.



'66

Engagements:

Barbara B. Clute to Randall S.

Lee

Joan L. Robinson to Harold D.

Thomas




Duane Paul Pettinicchi — son of Val-
erie Duval Pettinicchi '61



29



Weddings:

Carolyn Davis and William W.

Fish, III on September 26, 1970

in Stamford, Conn.

Linda J. Fagan and Peter S.

Casey on September 19, 1970

in Milford, Mass.

Charlotte A. Okula and David

M. Baker on December 13,

1969 in Greenfield, Mass.

Joan L. Robinson and Harold

D. Thomas in November 1970

in Boston, Mass.

Laurie Saltz and Gary S.

Cooper on November 1, 1970

in West Newton, Mass.

Ruth E. Scielzo and Richard A.

Waywell on October 10, 1970

in Wyckoff, New Jersey

Linda M. Zoccolante and

George F. Pearson, III in

September 1970 in Plymouth,

Mass.

Born: To Linda Cheney Burney a
daughter, Lori Ann, on Novem-
ber 7, 1970.

Elaine Paquin Healey, a secretary
at the Electric Boat Division, Groton,
Conn, writes: "After two years of
experience, I applied for my present
position — my boss has often com-
plimented me on my fine training — I
know it was due to the excellent
courses I received at Lasell".

Also enjoying secretarial assign-
ments are: Constance Hill, Cinderella
Career and Finishing School, Boston;
Margaret Ann Harrison Boyce, IBM,
White Plains, N.Y.; Laura Arcari
Amara, Superior Electric Company,
Bristol, Conn.; Marcia Moore Reed,
Creative Logic Corp., Paramus, N.J.;
Linda Smith Cohen, Tufts University,
Medford, Mass. Pamela Robbe Burke
has recently retired from her execu-
tive secretarial duties at American
Airlines; her more recent "assign-
ment" is caring for daughter
Michelle, born June 14, 1969.

Barbara Stern is a family reloca-
tion worker for the Boston Redevel-
opment Authority; has become active
in the social agencies in the South
End and Roxbury.

Staff nurses are: Linda Beardslee
(George Washington Memorial Hos-



pital, Washington, D.C.) and Barbara
Titus Spalding (New England Dea-
coness Hospital, Boston).

Kathy Steinmetz Dater is a Public
Health Clinic nurse for the State of
Conn.; Joan Erkkila Fayne is a dental
assistant in Osterville, Mass.; Susan
Campbell, a medical assistant in
Vallejo, Calif.

Holly Hall is secretary to Dr.
Robert W. Copelan of Paris, Ky. Dr.
Copelan is an equine orthopedic
surgeon; his patients are race horses.

Elementary public school teachers
include: Susan Case Anderson in
Albion, N.Y.; Joan Schneider Carp in
Weymouth, Mass.; Barbara Anne Rich
Dennis, Stamford, Conn.; Marsha
Howe, Hudson, N.H.; Susan Ellis
McLaughlin, Lexington, Mass.; Susie
DeWilde Smith-Brunet, Pembroke,
Mass.; and Deborah Fineberg, Bell-
ingham, Mass.

Margaret Bliss Roberts writes from
205A Glenhaven Drive, North Tona-
wanda, N.Y. "My present full-time
job is caring for daughter Kimberly
— born September 13, 1969. Pre-
viously, I was a secretary in the sales
department — Tapp Insulator Com-
pany, LeRoy, N.Y."

Joanne Frankel is working in the
Los Angeles office of C.B.S. Susan
Sturrman is Assistant Fashion Co-
ordinator, McCall Pattern Company,
New York City. Sandra Oakes Ham-
mond is manager of Fashion Lane,
Boston.

From Nassau Diane Cole wrote
Dean Babcock: "I am now off to
London until I am able to move to
New York to take up residence and
work there. Hope that all continues
to go well with you and Lasell; the
very best to you for Christmas and
the New Year."

Susan Zele Buxbaum describes
herself as a "Domestic Engineer".
Son, Michael, is about to celebrate
birthday #3.

'67

Engagements:

Mary Yih-Ping Tung to John
Juang-Ping Liu, November
1970



Weddings:

Carol A. DeVito and Louis W.
Piper on November 16, 1969
in Lexington, Mass.
Jill L. Ginsberg and Joseph E.
Young on September 13, 1970
in Fairfield, Conn.
Nancy Hynes and James R.
Patterson on October 24, 1970
in Phoenix, Arizona
Barbara J. Simpson and
Patrick A. Filoso on September
27, 1970 in Verona, N.J.
Joan A. Valentine and Doug-
las R. Anderson on September
19, 1970 in Framingham, Mass.
Pamela Wentworth and Donald
L. Ferland on October 17, 1970
in Freeport, Me.

From the Retailers: Janice Giam-
pietro Brown: "After graduation, I
worked as an Assistant Buyer for the
N.E. Trading Corporation, Natick,
Mass. for six months until I was
married. I then moved to California
to be with my husband (in the
service). After discharge, we moved
back to Boston where we rent an
apartment and have a year old son".
Barbara Ann O'Bryon is the manager
of the menswear department, Macy's,
Colonie, N.Y. Randi Barrett an as-
sistant buyer with Sperry & Hutchin-
son, N.Y.C. has taken advanced
courses at the Fashion Institute of
Technology.

Nancy Carlson Doak writes: "Have
moved from the job of secretary in
a subsidiary to secretary to two top
vice-presidents of Harrell Interna-
tional of Westport, Conn. This has
been most rewarding". Muriel Brad-
shaw is an assistant secretary with
Point Peter Block Company of
Wilmington, N.C. and is a member
of Home Housing Opportunities
Made Equal in Raleigh. Donelle
Kilbride Baars is a secretary with
Sanders Associates, Inc. of Nashua,
N.H. Ellen Wagner Brunjes, a secre-
tary with the U.S. Army, sends a new
address: USARVAL, A.P.O., N.Y.
09742. Adeline DeFusco is a re-
search secretary at Tufts Dental
School; Cynthia Nowak Cardellichio
is secretary to the principal of
Friends Academy, Locust Valley,



30



N.Y.; teaches cooking to seventh and
eighth grade students at the Acad-
emy. Nancy Murray Charlton is a
medical secretary in Needham; Anne
Martinson Roche is receptionist for a
Leicester (Mass.) doctor.

Audrey Hammar Hinsman writes
from Hayama, Japan: "I am doing
volunteer teaching to three classes
of Japanese children. They are
wonderful; I finish the English
classes by feeling I have accom-
plished more than they".

Sandy Erkis Summer is a substi-
tute teacher in the Columbus (Ohio)
school system; Margaret Ann Gil-
mour Blackmer teaches second
grade in Endwell, N.Y.; Donna
Rothman in Edison, N.J.; Pamela
Robie LaValley in Cohasset, Mass.
Deidre Culley Davis is a substitute
teacher for the Ohio County Board of
Education in Wheeling, W. Va. Mari-
lyn Bloomberg is a resident tutor
for Inner City Schools of Cleveland.
Carolyn Paine Finks is attending the
University of Miami and is a member
of the faculty of Plymouth Pre-
school, Coconut Grove.

Susan Dopman Moran is a design
assistant with Austin Dopman & As-
sociates of Baltimore; Mary McKim
Macdonald is assistant to the head
designer of Louis Mazor Inc. of Balti-
more, Md.

Patricia Lee is research assistant
and "Girl Friday" for Peter Ball Pub-
lications, Southport, Conn. Judith
Collins is medical record technician
at the Milford (Mass.) Hospital. Carol
Ann Shapiro is a registered medical
technologist for the Harvard Univer-
sity Health Services; Bonnie Lord is
a research assistant in electron
microscopy at Harvard Medical
School. Judith Locke Harrigan is a
staff nurse in the Pediatric Clinic,
Hahnemann Hospital, Philadelphia.

Marilea Robbins writes: "After
working two years at Yale University
for Dr. H. A. Lubs, I was asked to go
to Denver with him to open a lab at
the Medical Center and to train new
personnel in cytogenetics. I felt this
was a great honor and an accom-
plishment that made me very happy".

Susan Swienckowski reports: "I



have been employed by United Air
Lines for two years. I'm now acting
as an O.J.T. (on the job trainer) for
the airlines in which I help new
stewardesses while in flight. In my
spare time, I read to blind students,
at the Light House Institute of N.Y.C.,
who are studying for M.A. degress.
I also, on occasion, teach math to
one Viet Nam casualty who is parti-
ally blind".



'68

Engagements:

Elizabeth A. Ensor to Adolfo

R. Garcia

Pamela C. Peterson to Peter H.

Alford

Dale Yellen to Jerome D.

Ginsberg

Weddings:

Laura E. Gordon and Kenneth

A. Wernick on September 20,
1970 in Weston, Mass.
Paula L. Hugenberger and
Ross P. Richardson on Novem-
ber 14, 1970 in Wellesley Hills,
Mass.

Roberta M. Munce and William
G. Hayward, Jr. on October
10, 1970 in Bangor, Me.
Susan D. Penney and Joseph
E. Rizzo, III on October 18,
1970 in Watertown, Mass.
Susan J. Schoen and Joseph

B. Sappington on September
26, 1970 in West Hartford,
Conn.

Ann Sterner and Richard F.
Hyland on July 18, 1970 in
Haddonfield, N.J.
Sally C. Warren and Arthur D.
Hall on September 12, 1970 in
Wilton, Conn.

Stephanie Pendleton is employed
at the Pomeroy Department Store,
Reading, Penna.; Carol Lynn Spindler
is an assistant buyer at Gimbels,
New York City; Nanci Shorter
Kocher, an assistant buyer with
Jordan Marsh in Boston, is attending
night-school classes in management
and public speaking at Northeastern
University.



Jill Meyers Goldfarb is a service
representative in the New Haven
office of Connecticut Blue Cross;
Nancy Joseph Van Amburg has a
similar position with the Southern
N.E. Telephone Company in Bridge-
port; Patricia Berman Landis is a
receptionist at the University of Pitts-
burgh.

Barbara Callahan is a registered
staff nurse at Boston City Hospital;
Joan Peck is on the staff at Mass.
General Hospital; Judy Schaubert is
at the Highland Hospital, Rochester,
N.Y.; Cheryl-Lynn Hammond Boothby
is Recovery Room head nurse at the
Osteopathic Hospital, Portland,
Maine; Anne Torrance Wirth does
weekend duty at Georgetown Uni-
versity Infirmary.

Roberta Stott is a Medical Lab
Technician at St. Francis Hospital,
Hartford; Nancy Medbury Bartlett is
a secretary for a Springfield (Mass.)
medical billing service; Elizabeth
Brown Koss is a secretary at Boston
Children Hospital Medical Center.

Linda Reid, T.W.A. hostess, sends
a San Francisco address: 2280
Pacific. Susan Hawkes Daley teaches
second grade in Falmouth, Maine;
Marlene Starvish Friary is a kinder-
garten teacher at the St. Joseph
School, Taunton, Mass.; Susan
Gregory Gibbs is a credit investigator
for Ford Motor Credit Company,
Elmsford, N.Y.; Sharon Morrill Knight
is with Raytheon's Lowell (Mass.)
office; Francis Madigan Cramb is a
secretary at St. Luke's Hospital,
Chicago.

From Gretchen Glassmire Hanson,
27 Patricia Rd., Marlboro, Mass.: "My
husband and I returned to the Boston
area after Ed finished his college
education in Indiana. This comple-
tion was delayed due to a serve in
the Army in Germany. While in
Indiana, I worked in a small men's
specialty clothing store and was
active in the Wives' Club, an organi-
zation for married students".

Gail Gibson is continuing courses
in Elementary Education at Finch
College; will receive a B.S. degree in
February 1971. Elizabeth Goldberg
was graduated in July from New



31



York University with a degree in
journalism.

For the past two summers, Sharon
Neale, has been a member of the
staff of the Fresh Air Fund, N.Y.C.
Sharon teaches swimming in the
summer camp program for under-
privileged city youth.

Laurie Kanters is a technical as-
sistant for a Ophthalmologist at Chil-
dren's Hospital in Boston. Gail
Hitchcock is a secretary at the Hart-
ford Electric Light Company,
Wethersfield, Conn. She has con-
tinued courses at the University of
Hartford and Central Connecticut
State College.

Prior to moving to Phillipsburg,
N.J., Pat Clifford Fine was a member
of the faculties at Head Start Centers
in Scarboro, Maine and Panton, Vt.

Mary Lou Rossano, a graduate of
Wheelock College, "worked for Fol-
low Through (Cambridge, Mass.) the
summer of 1969 and was an assistant
unit leader at the Harrington School.
We concentrated on art projects, field
trips — Stoneham Zoo and Jordan's
animated circus. Loved it!"



'69

Engagements:

Roberta J. Elfenbein to Marc

E. Adel

Lynn D. Faber to Mark T.

Morrisey

Rena A. Hitchins to Wayne E.

Milligan

Susan C. Hulton to Clifford M.

Curtis

Deborah J. Lehan to Richard

A. Roberts

Linda L. Luskin to Michael L.

Foy

Weddings:

Sara G. Abel and Steven H.
Charno in September 1970 in
South Carolina

Mary A. Conboy and John J.
DeRosa, Jr. in October 1970
in West Roxbury, Mass.
Christine Hill and Michael V.
Rodden on September 19, 1970
in North Andover, Mass.
Carole A. Keller and Edward



P. Greenfield on July 5, 1970
in Great Neck, N.Y.
Linda Kelterborn and George
V. Milbury on August 22, 1970
in Garden City, N.Y.
Paula Lanigan and William G.
Thayer on September 12, 1970
in Winchester, Mass.
Laurie M. Lewis and Richard
A. Crossman on September 19,
1970 in Tulsa, Oklahoma
Nancy L. Sengstaken and
Daniel C. Wright on September
19, 1970 in Cold Spring
Harbor, N.Y.

Celia A. Zalduondo and Wil-
liam P. Beinstein on Decem-
ber 28, 1969



70



Engagements:

Barbara Beck to Albert L.
Mantilia, 3rd.

Ina R. Cohen to Aser Frisch
June R. Keenan to Vincent P.
Scalera

Nancy C. Koziell to Dennis L.
Brann

Candice L. Lamb to Steven J.
Kramer

Amy Marsh to Richard Katz
Betsy Jayne Pike to Richard
J. O'Keefe

Donna R. Provenzano to Wil-
liam F. Smith, III
Donna C. Wallins to Burton E.
Greenspon

Barbara Zecher to Thomas I.
Probert

Weddings:

Lee Brimblecom and Paul D.
Rich in September 1970 in
Needham, Mass.
Anne M. Cause and Kenneth
A. Johnson on September 19,
1970 in Winchester, Mass.
Alexandra M. Taylor and Rus-
sell M. Hills, Jr. on November
7, 1970 in Lincoln, Mass.
Karen I. Thomas and William
A. McDaniel on September 12,
1970 in Needham, Mass.



IN MEMORIAM



Florence Ebersole Bartlett '02 on
November 23, 1970 in Cincin-
nati, Ohio.

Harriet Wetsel Bryan x-'10 in March
1970 in Springfield, Mass.

Esther Ross Winger '18 on January
18, 1970.

Emma Perley Dewar x-'24 on Decem-
ber 14, 1970.

Ruth Ackerman Knapp x-'28 on
November 9, 1970 in Mont-
pelier, Vt.

Gladys Magee Johnston x-'38 on
November 12, 1970 in Portland,
Me.



32



SAVE THESE DATES



April 2-3-4



1971



Twenty-third Annual Alumnae Council Session



Kay Parsons, Chairman of Council



Reunion Weekend for 1971!



June 11-12-13



This is a new idea: ALL ON CAMPUS!



Watch for details in your April issue.



THE LASELL MEDALLION NOMINATING COMMITTEE



invites all alumnae to participate in the selection
of recipients by proposing to the Committee names of
candidates to receive Medallions during the coming
year.



The rules governing the annual awarding of the
Lasell Medallion stipulate that: "At the discretion of
the Committee, the award may be made to any
member of the Lasell Family who, by virtue of dis-
tinguished services to the College or to society at large,
has brought added honor to the name of Lasell. The
award could, therefore, be made to an alumna,
faculty/administrative/staff member, trustee, or to any
person who has shown interest in the College."



Please send your suggestions to Shirley Chesebro,
Medallion Committee Chairman, % Lasell Alumnae, Inc.










*4ii*



' parkview Dr.



J.



07041



^v,



jr?



^



LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE

Alumnae Office
Auburndale, Massachusetts 02166

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED



Non-Profit Org.



U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Auburndale, Mass.
Permit No. 10471




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Alumnae Council Issue
Spring 1971



Lasell Alumnae, Inc.



Officers 1970-71

President

Sandy Shelton Fitch '56 (Mrs. Norman P.)

9 Fox Lane, Medfield 02052

First Vice-President

Faye Wadhams Smith '38 (Mrs. Edward L.)
Duncaster Lane, Bloomfield, Conn. 06002

Second Vice-President

Alice Pratt Brown '29 (Mrs. William W.)
Crest Road, Middlebury, Conn. 06762

Recording Secretary

Nancye Van Deusen Connor '57 (Mrs. Philip J.)
28 Pilgrim Road, Wellesley 02181

Corresponding Secretary

Lee Pool Langley '46 (Mrs. P. B.)
355 Highland Street, Weston 02193

Treasurer

Ruth Turner Crosby '42 (Mrs. R. A.)
170 Harvard Street, Newtonville 02160

Assistant Treasurer

Ruth Buswell Isaacson '36 (Mrs. C. G.)

10 Laurel Avenue, Waltham 02154

Alumnae Fund Committee

Mildred Bell Cole '31 (Mrs. Oliver S.)
95 Fox Hill Street, Westwood 02090

Louise Tardivel Higgins '37 (Mrs. C. A., Jr.)
150 Hickory Road, Weston 02193

Nan Sparks Hunter '61 (Mrs. Carl E.)
69 Main St., Framingham Centre 01701

Scholarship Committee Chairman

Virginia Wolfe Perkins '44 (Mrs. E. F., Jr.)

West Side Road

North Conway, N.H. 03860



Directors

Christina Finlayson Dana '28 (Mrs. Ellis H.)
35 Woodchester Drive, Weston 02193

Dorothy Inett Taylor '30 (Mrs. L. D.)

41 Brentwood Drive, Holden 01520

Shirley Gould Chesebro '33 (Mrs. R. Alan)
110 Carver Road, Newton Highlands 02161

Camie Porter Morison '40 (Mrs. Wm. K.)
8 Park Ridge, Concord, N.H. 03301

Naomi Lederman Grossman '45 (Mrs. Everett P.)

51 Pickwick Road, West Newton 02165

Betty Williams McGowan '47 (Mrs. F. M., Jr.)

52 Brewster Avenue, Braintree Highlands 02185

Mary Small Lee '48 (Mrs. Walter C.)
192 Pine Ridge Road, Waban 02168

Joan Wallace Billings '50 (Mrs. Robert E.)
Ivy Road, Sherborn 01770

Marlene Berman Lewis '55 (Mrs. Milton B.)

42 Buckskin Drive, Weston 02193

Linda Nolin Ahern '55 (Mrs. Robert)
106 Hemlock Street, Arlington 02174

Marion Nutter Bredehoft '55 (Mrs. Bruce B.)
Box 181, Dover 02030

Penny Rafkin Hurwitz '56 (Mrs. Budd H.)
4 Rolling Drive, Framingham 01701

Susan Shaw Abbott '61 (Mrs. William S.)
50 Melvin Road, Arlington 02174



Alumnae Secretary

Marjorie MacClymon '32

Lasell Junior College, Auburndale 02166

Lasell Leaves

Editor

Patricia Searles

Alumnae Editor

Marjorie MacClymon '32



The Lasell Leaves is published quarterly by Lasell Alumnae, Inc., Lasell Junior College, Auburndale, Mass. 02166,
a member of the American Alumni Council since 1947. The views expressed herein are those of the editor and do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of the administration or Lasell Alumnae, Inc. Single copies of Lasell Leaves may
be obtained for $1.25 from the Alumnae Office.




At the annual Alumnae Council luncheon, Sandra
Shelton Fitch '56 read the citation for each of
the Medallion recipients before President Greene
presented the awards. Also attending were
(frames from left to right): Louise "Tap" Tardivel
Higgins '37, Fund Chairman; Mrs. Juliette Fager,
Placement Director for the College; and Ruth
Stafford Clark '33 talks with Virginia Ogden
Hayes '33.



Vol. XCVI No. 3
May 1971



CONTENTS



CREDITS:

Cover: Bragdon, perhaps the best-
remembered of all Lasell buildings, was
the subject chosen by Jane Sharpies '71 ,
who photographed and designed the cover
for this Alumnae Council issue.

Photos: Chalue: 12, 13, 18, 23

Editor: 9,12,13

Roger F. Turner, Jr.: 17
Design: The Editor
Printing: Crimson Printing Co.



A Letter from the President 2

Alumnae Council 1971 4

Amended Constitution 4

Treasurer's Report 8

Alumnae Career Panel 9

Medallion Recipients 12

Bragdon In Review 14

From the Campus 17

Class in skating is introduced
by senior Robin DeAngelis

Women in Politics 18

Mary B. Newman

In Memoriam 23

Alumnae
Wiider N.Smith

Clubs 24

Class Notes 24

Nellie Feagles Kattelle Scholarship 33



A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT



It may surprise you to hear it, but there is
one service you can perform for Lasell that
is almost more important than giving money.

Notice that I said "almost". I don't want to
give anyone the idea I am discouraging
contributions.

At least equally appreciated, however, is
alumnae help in recruiting promising students.
Lasell's reputation in the past, I know, has
always been based on the high caliber of our
student body; we want to keep it that way.
But we are moving into an era of much
sharper competition among colleges for the
good students, and you can be of genuine
service in helping us maintain our standards.

For example, how many girls from your area
are currently applying to Lasell? Do you
know who they are or anything about them?
Would you be willing to help our Admissions
Office screen the list — if there is a list — and
suggest likely candidates of your own?

Perhaps 80 percent of current Lasell
applications come from the Northeast: New
England plus New York and New Jersey. Both
Miss Marie Kaden, our Director of Admissions,
and Mrs. Karen Ferris, our Assistant Director,
maintain rigorous schedules just covering
this area. We want girls from the Northeast,
but we also want girls from the South and
Midwest and Far West. It is going to take



alumnae help to interest new students who
live outside the effective range of our Ad-
missions Officers, not only all over this country,
but in fact all around the world.

In that connection, it may interest you to
know that, in recent years, more and more
foreign students are coming to Lasell. We
applaud this trend. Foreign students automa-
tically contribute to the general educational
process almost as much as they receive; we
would like to have many more of them.

In a few cities, Lasell graduates have already
been of immense help to us in our recruitment
process. Perhaps I can recommend some
of their methods to all of you.

1. There is a return card bound into this
issue of The Leaves. If you have any names
of prospective students to suggest, either for
September 1971, or September 1972, we would
be glad to get them.

2. On receipt of your card, our Admissions
Office will write a warm, friendly note to the
girl(s) in question, giving her some basic
information about the College and telling her
that you have suggested she might be inter-
ested. A copy of this letter will go to you.

3. It would then be up to you to decide if
you wish to pursue it further locally. You
might write her a note yourself, or give her a
call asking if there is any information you
can supply. If you know of more than one
student thinking about Lasell, you might make
sure they know each other.

4. A few alumnae have felt challenged by
the recruitment possibilities, and we have set
up a continuing relationship. We would like to
see the list grow longer. Would you be
interested? This might involve receiving from
us names of other applicants from your area
that have come in independently, and asking
you to serve as our local representative,
making sure they have all the information



they need about Lasell, and providing a
friendly, neighborhood contact.

5. Other activities are also possible, though
some are best arranged through a Lasell Club
or group. You might invite all prospective
applicants to someone's home one evening
for a get-acquainted session. It is even
possible that a current Lasell student, or a
member of the faculty could come down and
talk to the group, bring pictures, slides or
other information. You can doubtless think
of other variations yourself.

What kind of girl to recommend? This is a
hard question to answer. The highly motivated,
well organized high school leaders are obvious
suggestions, of course; girls in this category
are sought by every college — we would be
glad to have them.

Beyond that, what we are looking for is the
girl with potential. She may not yet have
distinguished herself, either academically or
socially. She may not know yet what she is
good at, or even what she wants to do. Yet
you sense the potential is there. If you feel she
would benefit from the small college at-
mosphere, the personal supervision, and
genuine faculty interest that has always been
the hallmark of a Lasell education, we would
urge you to send in her name.

The Leaves will be printing additional insert-
reply cards from time to time; we regard this
as a program for the long pull. Please don't
get discouraged. It is frustrating, I know,
to recommend someone, and do all the work
of follow-through, then have her change her
mind at the last minute, or — even worse —
be turned down by Lasell. But please keep
your suggestions coming. If we can mobilize
all ten thousand of our present alumnae
into a continual channel of recruitment, and
recommendation, Lasell's place will be
secure in the front rank of junior colleges.



— Kenneth M. Greene



ALUMNAE COUNCIL 1971



April 2-3-4 were the dates, the campus was the place,
and alumnae were the featured guests at the Annual
Alumnae Council sessions in which delegates dis-
patched the business of Lasell Alumnae, Inc., gained
some insights into alumnae career patterns and college
affairs, and honored three outstanding alumnae with
Medallions for their distinguished careers since grad-
uation.

The weekend began with a reacquaintance social hour
at the home of President and Mrs. Greene and a buffet
dinner in Woodland Hall. Special guest speaker at
the dinner, Mrs. Elaine Cavanaugh, Director of the
Child Study Center, described some of the activities
of the center through a color slide presentation and
commentary illustrating the programs that were car-
ried out at the Rockwell facilities during the past year.
Alumnae reconvened for a Saturday morning session
devoted to a full agenda of business matters. Ap-
proval was given to an amended version of the con-
stitution prepared by the by-laws committee, treasurer's,
auditor's and scholarship committee's reports were
accepted, and new officers of Lasell Alumnae, Inc. for
the year 1971-72 introduced.



AMENDED CONSTITUTION

The following constitutional changes were proposed by the
By-Laws Committee of the Board of Management of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc. and were subsequently read and accepted at
the annual meeting, Saturday, April 3, 1971.

LASELL ALUMNAE, INC.

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS

CONSTITUTION

Article I — Name
The name of the organization shall be Lasell Alumnae, Inc.

Article II — Object

The object of this Corporation shall be to serve the interests
of Lasell Junior College, to aid deserving students, to
promote a spirit of fellowship among its graduates, past
students, faculty and the administration, and to bind the
alumnae to the college more closely for their mutual benefit.

Article III — Membership

Any Lasell graduate, former student, present or former
member of the administration or faculty, shall become
a member of Lasell Alumnae, Inc. by contributing to the
Annual Alumnae Appeal.

Proposed That "by contributing to the Annual Alumnae
change: Appeal" be deleted.

Article IV — Officers

Section 1 — The officers of this Corporation shall be
President, First Vice President, Second
Vice President, Recording Secretary, Corre-
sponding Secretary, Treasurer, Assistant
Treasurer, Alumnae Secretary, Alumnae Fund
Chairman, Scholarship Committee Chairman,
Directors, the number of which, shall not
exceed fifteen. These officers shall constitute
a Board of Management. This Board shall
also include as many regional Vice Presidents
as deemed necessary.

Proposed That following "Scholarship Committee
change: Chairman," section reads: Medallion Com-
mittee Chairman, Alumnae Clubs Advisor,
Directors, the number of which shall not
exceed twenty. These officers shall constitute
a board of Management. This Board shall
also include as many regional representatives
as deemed necessary.

Section 2 — The President must be a graduate of at least
five years standing.

Article V — Auditor

Section 1 — The Board of Management at least one month
before its annual meeting shall appoint a
competent person, preferably a certified
public accountant, to act as Auditor for the
ensuing year.

Proposed That Section 1 read: The Board of Manage-
change: ment, at least two weeks before its annual
meeting, shall appoint a competent person,
preferably the College Treasurer or Bursar,
to act as Auditor for the ensuing year.



Section 2 — The duty of the Auditor shall be to audit the
accounts of the Treasurer and certify the
same for the annual meeting.

Article VI — Annual Meeting

There shall be an annual business meeting of the
Corporation during the annual Lasell Alumnae Council
Meetings.

Article VII — Fiscal Year

The fiscal year shall be March 15 to March 15.



Proposed
change:



The fiscal year shall be March 31 to March 31.



Article VIII — By-Laws

Section 1 — This Corporation shall be governed by such
By-Laws as it may from time to time adopt.

Section 2 — These By-Laws shall include provision for
annual nomination of members of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc., to act as members of the
Corporation of Lasell Junior College for a
period of five years.

Section 3 — These By-Laws may be amended or suspended
at the annual business meeting of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc., by a two-thirds vote of
members present thereat, providing that a
written notice of such proposed amendment
or suspension has been sent to the Board of
Management, through the Secretary, at least
one month before such meeting.

Article IX — Amendments

This Constitution may be amended or altered at the annual
business meeting of Lasell Alumnae, Inc., by a two-thirds
vote of members present thereat, providing that a written
notice of such proposed amendment or suspension has been
sent to the Board of Management, through the Secretary, at
least one month before such meeting.



By-Laws



I Officers



Section 1 — The President shall be elected for a two-year
term. She shall preside at all meetings of the
Corporation and of the Board of Management,
shall be a member ex-officio of the Board
of Trustees of Lasell Junior College, also an
ex-officio member of all committees except
the Nominating Committee, and shall perform
the usual duties of the office. She is
authorized to countersign Corporation
checks and withdrawal orders after signature
by the Treasurer and may have access to the
safety deposit box when accompanied by
the Treasurer, and shall assist the Treasurer
or Assistant Treasurer when needed in the
transaction of their business.

Proposed That "except the Nominating Committee" be
change: deleted. That the following be added at the
end of Section 1: "Following her term of
office, she is to serve as a Director for a
minimum term of two years."



Section 2 — The First Vice President shall act for the

President in the latter's absence or incapacity
and shall act as alumnae relations officer,
such as Chairman of the Alumnae Council,
and a member of the Scholarship Committee.

Proposed Section 2 to read: "The First Vice President
change: shall be elected for a two-year term. She
shall, etc."

Section 3 — The Second Vice President shall act for the
First Vice President in the latter's absence or
incapacity and shall act as student relations
officer, also co-chairman of the Alumnae
Council.



Proposed
change:



Section 4-



Proposed
change:



Section 3 to read: The Second Vice President
shall be elected for a two-year term. She
shall act for the First Vice President in the
latter's absence or incapacity and shall act
as co-chairman of the Alumnae Council and
Chairman of Alumnae Reunion."

-The Recording Secretary shall keep written
records of the meetings of the Corporation and
of the Board of Management. She shall have
charge and custody of all papers and records
pertaining to her office.

Section 4 to read: "The Recording Secretary
shall be elected for a three-year term.
She shall keep written records of the
meetings of the Corporation and of the Board
of Management. Immediately following all
regular meetings of the Board, she shall send
a copy of the minutes to each member of
the Board of Management. She shall have
charge and custody of all papers and records
pertaining to her office."



Officers



Section 5 — The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct
the general correspondence of the
Corporation and shall have charge and
custody of all papers and records pertaining
to her office. She shall call all meetings of
the Corporation and Board of Management
when notified by the President.

Proposed Section 5 to read: "The Corresponding
change: Secretary shall be elected for a three-year
term. She shall, etc."

Section 6 — The Treasurer shall collect and, under the
direction and vote of the Board of Manage-
ment, shall disburse the funds of the
Corporation. She shall keep adequate records
of the transactions of her office and shall
make a report to the Corporation at its annual
meeting of the state of its finances, and shall
perform the usual duties of the office. She
shall sign all checks and withdrawal orders
with the countersignature of the President or
Assistant Treasurer and with either one of
them shall have access to the safety deposit
box of the Corporation and shall transact
such financial business as the Board of
Management directs.



Proposed Section 6 to read: "The Treasurer shall be
change: elected for a five-year term. She shall collect,
etc."

Section 7 — The Assistant Treasurer shall assist the
Treasurer in all her duties and discharge
the duties of the Treasurer in the absence or
inability to act of that officer. She may
accompany the Treasurer to the safety
deposit box and may countersign Corporation
checks and withdrawal orders after signature
by the Treasurer.

Proposed Section 7 to read: "The Assistant Treasurer
change: shall be elected for a five-year term. She shall
assist, etc." Additional sentence following
"signature by the Treasurer": "She shall also
serve as liaison officer between the Board
of Management and the Leaves Editor."

Section 8 — The Alumnae Secretary shall act as a liaison
officer between the Board of Management and
the College and shall perform the duties of
that position.

Section 9 — The Alumnae Fund Chairman shall be

responsible for the Class Agent System, and
shall assist in the organization of the Alumnae
Council and shall assist the Editor of the
Lasell Leaves in publishing the Fund issue.

Proposed Section 9 to read: "The Alumnae Fund
change: Chairman shall be elected for a four-year

term. She shall be responsible for the Annual
Alumnae Appeal. The Chairman will have
served a minimum term of two years as a
member of the Alumnae Fund Committee. A
member of the Committee shall not serve
more than six consecutive years without an
interim of one year.

Section 10 — The Chairman of the Scholarship Committee
shall meet with her committee and shall
report the recommendations of her
committee to the Board of Management at its
May meeting.

Proposed Section 10 to read: "The Chairman of the
change: Scholarship Committee shall be elected for a
four-year term. She shall report the recom-
mendations of her committee to the Board of
Management at its May meeting and
throughout the year as deemed necessary.

Section 11 — The Chairman of the Medallion Committee

shall be elected for a two-year term. She shall
report the recommendations of her committee
to the Board of Management after April 15.

Section 12 — The Alumnae Clubs Advisor shall be elected
for a four-year term. She shall act as liaison
officer between the Corporation and the
Alumnae Clubs.

Section 13 — Directors shall be elected for a three-year

term. No director shall serve more than three
consecutive years without an interim of one
year.



Section 11 — (a)



Proposed
change:



The Board of Management shall have charge
of the organization, and of its funds, subject to
the approval of the Corporation; shall have
power to transact necessary business in the
interim of meetings; shall appoint an Auditor,
as hereinbefore provided; shall arrange for
the bonding of the three officers having
access to the funds: the President, Treasurer
and Assistant Treasurer — such individual
bond to be not less than 25% of the amount
of the principal at the annual meeting; shall
appoint all standing committees not otherwise
provided for; and shall have power to fill all
vacancies occurring in the Board itself or in
any committee, and, in case of emergency, to
appoint the Assistant Treasurer as Acting
Treasurer and to notify the banks as
necessary.

"Section 11 — (a)" to be renumbered: "Section
14 — (a) Delete: "such individual bond to be
not less than 25% of the amount of the
principal at the Annual Meeting;"



Section 11 — (b)



Proposed
change:



Proposed
change:



Ten members of the Board shall constitute a
quorum for the transaction of business.

"Section 11 — (b)" to be renumbered: "Section
14 — (b)" A quorum shall be determined by
one-half plus one of the voting membership
of the Board of Management,
(c)

The Board shall hold a meeting each year
at least one month before the annual meeting
to prepare for the business of the annual
meeting, and it may hold such others as are
found necessary for due attention to the
welfare of the organization.

"Section 14" to precede "(c)".



II Standing Committees

Proposed Section 1 — Alumnae Fund Committee. This
change: Committee shall consist of the Chairman, the
Treasurer of Lasell Alumnae, Inc., and two
members of the Board of Management.

Section 1 — Scholarship Committee. This committee shall
consist of the Chairman, the First Vice
President of Lasell Alumnae, Inc., and two
administrative officers from Lasell Junior
College, and shall have charge of any
scholarships granted by the Corporation and
all business pertaining to such scholarships.
Income accruing from the Scholarship Fund
may be used to aid students chosen by said
committee.

Proposed That "Section 1" be renumbered "Section 2:
change: and read: "Scholarship Committee. This

committee shall consist of the Chairman, the
First Vice President and Treasurer of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc., and shall have charge, etc."



Proposed Section 3 — Medallion Committee. This
change: Committee shall consist of the Chairman, an
incoming Chairman, President of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc., and three members of the
Board of Management. The Chairman shall
be a member of the preceding year's
Medallion Committee. In addition, ex-officio
members shall include the Alumnae Secretary
and a College Corporation member.

Section 2 — Nominating Committee. This committee shall
consist of three members elected by the
Corporation for one year. Their duties shall
be to present a slate of officers and a new
Nominating Committee to the Board of
Management for election by the Corporation.

Proposed That "Section 2" be renumbered Section 4
change: and the following sentence added: "The
Chairman shall be a non-voting member
ex-officio of the Board of Management.

Section 3 — Quorum. A quorum of each committee shall
consist of a majority of its members.



That "Section 3" be renumbered "Section 5".



Proposed
change:

III Elections



Elections to replace officers whose terms have expired
shall be conducted annually by ballot. A majority vote of
ballots returned shall determine the slate.

Proposed Elections shall be conducted at the Annual
change: Meeting of the Corporation. Officers having
served designated terms may not be re-
elected to the same office without an interim
of one year. Exception: the President, whose
term may be extended one year.

IV Nominations for Alumnae Members of Lasell Junior College
Corporation.

(Lasell Alumnae, Inc. nominates these candidates, but the
College Corporation itself elects them).

The Board of Management shall submit a list of
candidates for membership in the Lasell Junior College
Corporation whenever vacancies are to be filled. The service
of each member elected is for five consecutive years.

V Alumnae Fund

An annual contribution to the Alumnae Fund — minimum
amount to be determined by the Board of Management —
includes membership in this Corporation and a year's
subscription to the alumnae magazine, the Lasell Leaves.



Proposed
change:



That: "V Alumnae Fund" be deleted.



VI Rules of Order

The principles of procedure, as set forth in Roberts'
Rules of Order, Revised, shall govern the proceedings of
this Corporation, subject to the special rules which have
been or may be adopted.



Proposed That "VI Rules of Order" be renumbered
change: "V Rules of Order".



REUNIONERS!



Make your reservations now for our
first "all on campus" reunion



June 11-12-13



and



receive a copy of the reunion brochure



TREASURER'S REPORT



LASELL ALUMNAE, INC.

Annual Report of the Treasurer
April 1, 1970— April 1, 1971

General Fund Checking Account: Newton-Waltham Bank & Trust Comany

INCOME:

Balance Forward 4/1/70 $ 7,711.21

Alumnae Contributions

4/1/70-9/30/70 35,743.25

9/30/70-4/1/71 11,024.05

Sale of Lamp Pins 5.00

Reunion Income 912.00

Sale of Lasell Chairs 95.00
Total Income

EXPENSES:

Leaves (4 issues)

Fund Expenses

American Mail $ 9,249.22

Thank You Letters 50.45

Mailing Stickers & Envelopes 416.50

Letters '71 110.91

Postage 120.00

Council Expenses

American Alumni Dues $ 155.00

Lasell Alumnae Council

Programs 340.00

Speakers 106.00

Flowers 15.00

Delegate to A.A.C. Conference 50.00

Reunion Expenses

1970 Reunion $ 366.54

Deposit for Caterer '71 100.00

Miscellaneous

Telephone-Postage-Stationery $ 24.19

Lamp Pins — reorder 527.52

File Tax Report 3.00

Medallions (engraving) 28.94

Chairs 85.25

Gifts 87.64

Postage (special mailing) 339.29

Checks — reorder 8.29

Instant Updating — Files 510.94

Total Expenses

Transferred to Scholarship Fund

Transferred to Building Fund

Total Disbursements

Balance on hand 4/1/71 (Checking Account)



$ 55,490.51



$ 19,350.59



$ 9,947.08



666.00



$ 466.54



$ 1,615.06
$ 32,045.27
$ 2,000.00
$ 10,000.00



$ 44,045.27
$ 11,445.24



SPECIAL FUNDS

Newton Savings Bank (90 day Notice Account)

Balance forward 4/1/70

Gifts

Interest

Transferred from Checking Account

Transferred to Term Deposit Certificate
Balance on hand 4/1/71 Newton Savings Bank

Newton Savings Bank (Daily Interest Account)

Balance forward 4/1/70

Interest

Balance on hand 4/1/71 Newton Savings Bank

West Newton Savings Bank (Scholarship Fund)

Balance forward 4/1/70

Gifts

Interest & Dividends

Transferred from Checking Account



Less: Payment to Lasell Jr. College

Scholarship Awards
Balance on hand 4/1/71 West Newton Savings Bank
Needham Cooperative Shares — 5 shares



$106,366.25

202.00

1,534.22





$


10,000.00


$118,102.47
$100,000.00
$ 18,102.47


$ 2,776.31
111.64










$ 2,887.95


$ 3,746.28
110.00
379.19









$


2,000.00


$


6,235.47


$


2,200.00



First National Bank (90 day Notice Account)

Balance forward 4/1/70

Interest

Balance on hand 4/1/71 First National Bank

Newton Savings Bank — General Fund

Balance forward 4/1/70

Interest



$ 28,976.10
1,471.39



$ 7,731.36
299.17



Balance on hand 4/1/71 Newton Savings Bank General Fund
Auburndale Cooperative Bank — 5 shares

Newton Savings Bank — Term Deposit Certificate

Account opened 4/17/70

Transferred from 90 day Notice Account

Interest

Balance on hand 4/1/71



$100,000.00
3,571.62



$ 4,035.47
$ 1,000.00
$ 5,035.47



$ 30,447.49



$ 8,030.53
$ 1,000.00
$ 9,030.53



$103,571.62



TOTAL BALANCES

Checking Account
Building Funds
General Funds
Scholarship Fund

Total 4/1/71



$ 11,445.24

152,121.58

11,918.48

5,035.47

$180,520.77



FUND DEPOSITORIES

Newton-Waltham Bank & Trust Company Checking Account

Newton Savings Bank (90 day Notice Account)

Newton Savings Bank (Daily Interest Account)

West Newton Savings Bank (Scholarship Fund)

First National Bank (90 day Notice Account)

Newton Savings Bank (General Reserve Fund)

Newton Savings Bank — 1-yr. Term Deposit Certificate

Auburndale Cooperative Bank — 5 shares

Needham Cooperative Bank — 5 shares

TOTAL 4/1/71



$ 11,445.24

18,102.47

2,887.95

4,035.47

30,447.49

8,030.53

103,571.62

1,000.00

1,000.00

$180,520.77



Ruth E. Crosby, Treasurer

The audit of Lasell Alumnae, Inc., books and records was made by Miss Alice May,
Bursar — Lasell Junior College.






Alumnae

Career

Panel




Career Panel (from left to right): Barbara Moulton '63; Marcia Madden '62; Alumnae Secretary,
Marjorie MacClymon '32, who introduced the panelists; Jean Dewar Farrell '43; and Nan
Sparks Hunter '61.



While the voices of women's libera-
tionists continue their outcry against
the inequality of opportunity for
women, and their subsequent frustra-
tions in seeking meaningful careers,
the career panel of alumnae returning
to talk about their respective involve-
ments offered a note of compensating
optimism of a sort. Certainly they
presented, with refreshing candor,
four positive avenues for achievement
which, in keeping with the spirit of
the seventies, were in the service
of others. The following account of
the challenges and rewards found in
each of their chosen professions may
reflect at least in part some of the
obvious sense of fulfillment each
expressed in describing these
commitments.



Barbara Moulton '63

[The youngest of three daughters of
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Moulton, Larchmont,
N.Y., all of whom attended Lasell
(Shirley Moulton DeVore '50 and
Carol Moulton Hokanson '54), Barbara
joined the Hartford National Bank
and Trust Company on graduation
as a clerk typist. Today she is one of
four personnel assistants for the
company, which, as the largest bank
in Connecticut, has 2500 employees.]

Opening the panel with a description
of what is involved in performing all
the personnel functions for 2500
employees, Barbara explained that
finding qualified applicants is really



only a small part of her job. Since
the staff is relatively small, the
responsibilities are quite varied and
to describe them one would have to
choose not a typical day in the office,
but a typical year in which all of these
projects would work through their
various stages of development.

But basically a job description
would have to include: counseling
employees; gaining information for
salary reviews; recruiting at colleges;
handling newspaper advertising,
business details, employment
agencies; conducting orientation
sessions; and finally, the screening
and hiring of applicants.

Dealing with all of these aspects of
the basic function makes it unstruc-
tured work, and working with an
enormous variety of people, makes
each situation in a sense unique.
You have to enjoy both of these
conditions to enjoy the work, she
explained. The people to be inter-
viewed, too, provide a variety of
problems and situations to cope with.
While some are looking for their first
jobs, some are trained and
experienced; some are technically
skilled workers, others are office
personnel. In short, she said, each of
these situations requires of the
personnel interviewer a whole set of
personal and professional attributes
that must be applied to making
on-the-spot decisions.

As the company representative in



these interviews, the interviewer's
job is really to assume responsibility
for making independent decisions that
translate company policy to fit the
situation at hand. Whatever you
decide, you must stick with it, and
this, she added, is what makes it so
interesting. You learn a great deal
about people, and you learn to cope
with almost any kind of question that
may be thrown to you.

And, not only is it educational and
challenging, but the satisfactions are
many — especially for a woman, since
it is a field where there is no
discrimination against women. A
woman in personnel is paid well, she
makes just as much as her male
counterpart, is just as involved as he
in all phases of the work.

The final and most important
satisfaction, she concluded is feeling
that you are really reaching and
helping people. There is the inevitable
human failure that comes in dealing
with people, "the feeling of not
reaching enough, not helping enough,
but when you can, it is extremely
rewarding."



Marcia Madden '62

[Receiving the silver scholarship
medal and a Lasell Jacket at her
graduation, Marcia continued her
education at the University of New
Hampshire, completing requirements



for her degree in Occupational
Therapy in 1966. Since then she has
been affiliated with: the District of
Columbia General Hospital, the
Memminger Foundation, Topeka; and
the Lemuel Shattuck Hospital, Boston.
Presently she is a member of the
Executive Board of the Massachusetts
Association for Occupational Therapy
and is head therapist at the Dr. Harry
Solomon Mental Health Center in
Lowell. Her mother, Priscilla Parmenter
Madden '37 is a past president of
Lasell Alumnae, Inc., a member of
the Corporation, and former member
of the Board of Management.]

To clear away any lingering wisps
of an image of some "leather bag"
occupational therapist, Marcia began
by describing the training required to
enter the profession. First, she
explained, it is a five-year program
of medically-oriented courses. Biology,
zoology, anatomy, neurology, and
neuroanatomy are required, and her
own curriculum contained an addi-
tional minor in psychology with
emphasis on the behavioral sciences.
There are activity-oriented courses too,
maybe designed to develop a craft
or work skill, to help the student learn
to evaluate a patient's prevocational
skills.

Basically there are two areas of
occupational therapy: working with
physical disabilities, where the aim is
to help the individual attain the
highest level of functioning he can.
Here training is directed to improve
muscle strength, range of motion, and
performance of basic life tasks, such
as dressing, eating, etc. The second,
mental health, is the area of her
particular interest.

In mental health the basic definition
of purpose is that essentially you are
concerned with action, or with the
doing processes — in creating in-
creased skills that will yield a certain
satisfaction and sense of creative
self-fulfillment and social balance in
the patient. Presently she is involved
in three major area of mental health
therapy:

First, she does activities pro-
gramming — developing recreational



or craft programs and overseeing
them to be sure they do in fact
provide a basis for new social skills
and self-development.

Second, she is part of a mental
health team that makes home visits to
out-patients, or people referred by
the community. In this area especially,
she says, she tries to emphasize what
people can do, rather than what
they can't. Utilizing the limited time
she has to help them perform more
realistically, she tries to help them
make decisions where they may not
realize there is a choice of action,
to find alternatives, and in this way
to go beyond their anxiety to seek
and find solutions to their problem.

Third, she described her work with
a task-oriented group set up as part of
a model cities program to effect
change. Again, she explained, the
problem was one of getting through
the feelings of the members of the
group and providing them with the
means to find alternative action,
and to feel in creating change that
they were really affecting their
environment.

In other areas of rehabilitation her
work includes visits to youths in jail,
helping them develop problem-solving
tools that will give them a way to
decide what they'll do next, and
running a communications center for
the parents of juveniles now in half-
way houses. One way they've found
to bring parents and these youths
into a closer understanding, she said,
has been to involve parents
separately in the same simulated
problem-solving projects used to help
their children develop alternatives.
Later they are brought together to
confront the same problem set
simultaneously.

Her work in the area of drug
rehabilitation has taken the form of
consulting with SHARE in Lowell,
planning drop-in centers for the
seven surrounding areas, countering
by involving children in craft projects
at the playgrounds where drugs are
being obtained. Coping with the drug



scene in a slightly different way too,
she is acting as a consultant helping
to set up a therapeutic drug com-
munity, which, while run for and by
residents, does utilize "involved"
consultants.

The work is enjoyable, Marcia
added, because you are helping
people to use their strengths. "The
work you are doing with people is
in a sense preventative, and it's very
exciting — you yourself are always
developing new skills in working with
people."



Nan Sparks Hunter '61

[The mother of four, and active in a
number of local organizations to help
children of all ages, Nan has served
as co-ordinator for the Fresh Air
Fund in this part of Massachusetts
for the last seven years. This year
she was selected by the Outstanding
Young Women of America Program
from 6,000 nominations of young
women between 21 and 35 to appear
in the 1970 listing which is designated
to recognize those who contribute to
the betterment of their communities,
professions and country. Currently
she is involved in work for the Fresh
Air Fund and Families for Inter-racial
Adoption. Among her many recent
interests have been: teaching nursery
school in Framingham, and substitute
teaching in special classes for
retarded children in the Nixon School
in Sudbury. She is majoring in
Kindergarten education at Framingham
State College and is presently serving
as a Director of Lasell Alumnae, Inc.]

Speaking first about her activities
with the Fresh Air Fund Nan supplied
some background information about
the organization which goes back
to its establishment by a minister in
the poor section of New York City
in 1877. Admitting 4-5 children from
these areas in its first year, it was
designed so that they might experi-
ence a summer in a family situation
out of the city. The program steadily
grew, with the help of its then spon-



10



soring agent the New York Herald
Tribune, until this year more than
15,500 children between the ages
of five and twelve visited 2,500
communities scattered through
twelve states from Virginia to Maine.

In her role as area chairman for the
fund during the last seven years,
she has helped the program to
increase the number of children in
the Framingham area alone from 19
to 90. Most of her time is spent
matching host-families with visiting
children. Each spring she conducts
group sessions for prospective
families, and on arrival day she joins
each of the host families to welcome
their two-week visitors, to answer
questions, and to be on hand to help
iron out any difficulties that may arise
while they are here. She also handles
publicity for the fund and organizes
activities for the four sub-chairman
that assist her during the two-week
summer period. Usually there are
children in the families already, she
explained, so that no special attention
has to be given to prescribing
activities. The idea is really to create
a whole family situation, especially
one with a father at its head, which
in so many cases has been lacking in
the child's experience.

The four-year old Families for
Inter-racial Adoption, is, she said,
her second love. Again, she is
involved in publicizing and recruiting
for this program as well. Most of the
recruiting is done by holding small
coffee discussions in people's homes,
largely with people who are already
looking for children to adopt. The
point, she said, is not really to
persuade people who might not be
otherwise interested in the program,
because you can not really anticipate
for them how they will handle some
of the problems that will come up
in the difficult teenage years, but
rather to encourage people who may
have some inherent interest in the
program.

While there are no particular
qualifications for families who are



interested in adopting these children,
Nan added, many are afraid. She
herself feels from her own experience
that, "If you love children, you will
have an understanding that will
enable you to do a lot more than you
think you can."



Jean Dewar Farrell '43

[After raising four children, Jean
recently completed all the require-
ments for her master's degree at
Salem State College, and expects to
graduate in June with a Master of
Education in Guidance. Returning to
college a few years ago, she was
one of the thirteen first women
graduates in the Women's Day
Program at Northeastern University,
where she was also awarded the
first scholarship. Meanwhile, evenings
she attended classes at Framingham
State College and between semesters
she went to summer classes at
Tufts and Boston University to
complete her program in 1968.
Presently Jean is certified by the
state in guidance and teaching and
is working for the Cerebral Palsy
Clinic and Preschool where she is in
charge of all psychological and social
services. Also a member of a Lasell
family, Jean's mother, the late Emma
Perley Dewar, and her aunt, Margaret
Perley Downey, both graduated in
1920, and a sister, Ann Dewar Condon,
was graduated in 1949.]

Jean began talking about her
"two for one" life, as she calls it (with
first a family, then a full-fledged career)
by explaining about cerebral
palsy, which is an insult during or
at the time of birth, in the motor
action center of the body. If you
think of it as a normal brain with
BB shot, she suggested, you can
better visualize both the localized
damage, which produces normal
intelligence with mild problems with
the arms or legs, or the diffuse
damage, which causes the quadra-
plegic (use of arms and legs
impaired up to 50%), the mentally
retarded, and the perceptually handi-
capped. Of these generally, the more
aware, the brighter the student, the



deeper the emotional handicap. "It
is, you see," she added, "truly a
multiple handicap."

Working through the North Shore
Celebral Palsy Association, her
aim has been to bring tools for growth
to both the clinic, where out-patient
physical and speech therapy is
conducted, and to the pre-school
program, where placements may be
made for children anywhere between
the ages of four and eight (there are
no hard-line age requirements). Here
they receive academic readiness and
social programs similar to those of
regular schools along with special
speech and motor therapy.

In most cases the children have a
severe perceptual handicap, which
can be seen when they are asked
to translate a perceived object, such
as a square for example, onto paper.
Although the object is seen, they
have no body orientation and their
direction loss means they cannot
draw it. The reason for this is that
since this type of child has been
paralyzed since birth, he has never
crawled, or bumped into things, or
fallen, and so doesn't know where
his body ends and the world begins;
there is no middle of him, no right or
left; hence, he also has no reading
ability.

The most important thing she
learned, when starting this work,
she said, did not come from a book
but in her first field assignment when
she realized it wasn't the specific
job she might be assigned to that
mattered, but what she might make
out of it. So, when she was assigned
as a home visitor at the North Shore
center a year and a half ago, she
began training the children psy-
chologically for school, and now she
is working as the psychologist in
charge of all social and psychological
services, including testing.

"My day runs a year," she explained,
"and I call it following the trail."
First I interview the child to decide
what to do, determining speech
abilities and school level through: a
home visit to get medical and social
data on the child; taking part in the
pre-school program to observe the
child's ability to respond as well as his



11



independent action; and then formal
psychological testing, using verbal
activity and fine motor control tests.

And this has become the real
focal point of her work, since she
says, there simply are no tests that
adequately measure the ability of
these children. Since they measure
performance, they can tell you a
child is functioning on a retarded
level, but this does not necessarily
mean he is retarded mentally. Here
the challenge is know your materials
well enough to read true ability
through them. It's a frontier where
you must devise ways of measuring
and communicating that have never
been tried before.

After testing there are staff con-
sultations to design a curriculum to
fit the child's individual needs,
according to his development profile.
Next, you think about placement
which requires reevaluating the
children and reassessing the school
services which are continually
changing. Then there is counseling at
home with the child's parents, since
many of these children are bankrupt
emotionally.

As a next step all placements are
followed up. Usually there is some
advising involved and testing in the
public school. The outside activities
that can be developed for them are
continued too, since they gain in
importance when, as is often the
case, the world closes in on these
children. She has devised recreational
programs such as arts, music, crafts,
and bowling. She supervises some of
these on Saturdays, and finds time
too to try to raise money for these
programs; trying to get legislative
action for state support, since most
of the children are on welfare.
Eventually she hopes to get a mobile
unit going to take therapists and the
testing to the schools.

When people ask Jean if it isn't
depressing working with these
children, she answers, "Not at all. If
you wonder why suffering, you can
look at these children who are so
brave and happy, so flexible, and are
so much deeper and more mature
people for their suffering."



Medallion
Recipients

The following citations were made
by Lasell Alumnae, Inc. President
Sandra Shelton Fitch '56 before Dr.
Greene presented each of the three
recipients with the Lasell Medallion.





1.
Ida Beane Rice '15

Ida Beane Rice was graduated
from Lasell in 1915, married in 1916
and until 1950 was busy raising her
family — a son and a daughter — now
expanded to include seven grand-
children and one great-granddaughter.
Plus the list of usual activities,
including courses in law, writing,
religion and painting, Mrs. Rice has
been very active in the life of her
church, the Waban Woman's Club,
the Newton League of Woman Voters
and the D.A.R.

In 1949 she met Dr. Miriam Van
Waters, the famed penologist, who
was superintendent of the Massachu-
setts Correctional Institution, the only
prison for women in the state. Mrs.
Rice greatly admired Dr. Van Waters
and under her guidance worked with
a group — "Friendly Visitors" — who
counselled and visited with the
confined girls.

Convinced that a secure, decent
place to live — help to find and retain




a job — an opportunity to live within
the law in a community — was vital
for a woman released from prison,
Mrs. Rice, then president of Friends
of Framingham, organized and
established the first Half Way House.
With no precedent to follow and
deep-rooted prejudices to overcome,
it was a long struggle to complete the
pioneer project. The House has been
in continuous operation for seven
years and has meant Hope to many
discouraged women.

Mrs. Rice now serves as an
Honorary Director of Friends of
Framingham; certainly no way of life
is more rewarding than service unto
others. It is a distinct pleasure for
Lasell Alumnae Incorporated to award
a Medallion to Ida Beane Rice.



Dorothy Burnham Eaton '20

From the world of letters and
from the Class of 1920 comes the
next Lasell graduate to be honored
today. The poems of Dorothy Burnham
Eaton have been included in various
anthologies and have appeared in
several publications, including poetry
magazines and in: The Saturday
Review, Saturday Evening Post,
Ladies' Home Journal, McCalls, Poet
Lore, Lyric, Nature, Outdoor World,
N.Y. Times, and former Herald
Tribune. Her book of selected verse,
"True Places," was published in 1955.




President Greene presenting Medallions
to: 1. Ida Beane Rice '15, 2. Dorothy
Burnham Eaton '20, and 3. Adele Bigham
Nelson '24.



Mrs. Eaton has won the Golden
Rose of the New England Poetry Club,
awarded for distingushed service to
poetry. Other prizes include those
given by Poet Lore, Lyric, Poetry
Society of Virginia, and the
Poetry Society of America.

In recent years she has taught
classes and individuals in versification
and the enjoyment of poetry. For the
past four years her essay series,
"Our Two Acres," which describes
the wild life visitors to the Eaton's
country home in Harvard, Massachu-
setts, has been a regular twice-a-
month feature in the Christian Science
Monitor.

Mrs. Eaton is a member of many
local and national poetry societies
and has made a gift of poetry and
literary magazines to the Lasell
Library.

In recognition of her many literary
contributions, Lasell Alumnae
Incorporated is pleased to award a
Medallion to Dorothy Burnham Eaton.





Adele Bigham Nelson '24

Adele Bigham Nelson, founder
and chairman of the Council on
Recreation and Education for Senior
Citizens in Onondaga County, is
Executive Director of the Corinthian
Foundation, Inc. of Syracuse, N.Y.
Her work with senior citizens can be
traced back to 1928 when she
launched her career as a volunteer
worker through the Junior League.
Representing Central New York on a
five-man State Council on Recreation
for the Elderly since its inception in
1956, Mrs. Nelson continues to
encourage the establishment and
operation of municipal recreational
programs for older men and women.

Mrs. Nelson was selected as
All-Time Woman of Achievement by
the Syracuse Post Standard in 1968;
prior recognitions include the Syracuse
Rotary Club Community Service
Award; in 1956 she was named
Woman of the Year by the Jewish
Home of Central New York. She is a
member of the National Council on the
Aging, The Gerontological Society
and various civic auxiliaries and
organizations in Syracuse.

The editors of the 1924 Lamp
were far-sighted in their personal
evaluation: "Del is one of the more
recent recruits to our ranks, but her
generosity and helpfulness have
placed her among the tried veterans."
Mrs. Nelson's daughter, Diane Nelson
Cowan, is a member of Lasell's
Centennial Class — 1951 ; her sister-in-
law is Dorothy Ely Bigham '21.

Lasell Alumnae Incorporated is
grateful for this opportunity to honor
Adele Bigham Nelson.



13



BRAGDON IN REVIEW



1851-65




Statuesque on the hill above the
newer campus, Bragdon has for
generations of Lasell graduates not
only served a range of functions, but
has stood as an historic landmark
blending the past with today. Her full
familiar grandure, however, was
acquired slowly, from her early life in
the 19th century when she stood at
something considerably less than half
of her present size.

Cushman Hall, as Bragdon
was first called, was planned by
Boston architects Billings & Sleeper
for the six and a half acre lot bought
by Edward Lasell on what was
already an historic Woodland Road —
known to have been in existence



since 1664 and to have been the
county highway over which General
Burgoyne's captive army retreated to
Boston in 1777. When the doors were
finally opened in November of 1851,
one hundred and nine young ladies
moved in to mark the beginning of
the seminary.

Chronologically, the first changes
to the building were made, according
to Ruth Hopkins Spooner in "Lasell's
First Century, 1851-1951," under
the administration of Charles W.
Cushing (1864-1874). At that time,
she says, "Gas was installed for
lighting," with the intention of
" 'rendering the building safe in
regard to fire' "*




Sometime later, before the east
wing was built, the roof was raised
the height of one floor and the
studio put on top. From this studio,
which in 1878 consisted of two large
rooms called the Crayon Room and
Oil Painting Studio, soon sprang
an art gallery which by 1890 was
flourishing with 1,900 pieces, many of
them originals, including: color, oil,
and water paintings, engravings,
sculpture — and photographs — which
were all given a catalogue listing.

In May 1881 ground was broken
for the new east wing, followed
closely by construction of the south
wing — in all more than doubling the
size of the building at that time at
an additional cost of $30,000. The
plans of this first addition, according
to Mrs. Spooner, provided for the
gymnasium and dining room in the
basement; principal's apartments,
kitchen for cooking classes, and an
elevator on the south side of the first
floor hall; principal's, teachers' and
students' parlours, guest and music
rooms, and offices on the north side;
students' rooms on the second floor;
a society room, sanitorium, and eight
or nine student rooms on the third
floor; and piano practice rooms and
store room for trunks on the fourth
floor. Mr. Ordway notes that the 12-15
pianos kept in these practice rooms
by a music department that was
thriving during the first two decades
of the 20th century were in 1920
replaced with new ones which
"were hoisted the five floors in the
rear and taken in through a window."



'Parenthetically, it's perhaps interesting to note that when fire did break out much later (in 1908), it started in an
oil soaked table where the watchman filled the big kerosene lamps used in the kitchen, according to Mr. Earl
Ordway, half-brother of Dr. Winslow, who for years was in charge of buildings and grounds for the College.
In his notebook he recorded, "This table was at the foot of the stairs going down from the kitchen to the base-
ment. When the fire department arrived they found the hydrant on Grove Street frozen, but they were able to keep
the fire from going above the first floor, though some walls on that floor were broken open to stop the fire, especi-
ally in the hall and chapel walls." Although the damage was not extensive, it did require considerable
renovation in the area called the "Back Bay" where rooms for office and dining room personnel were subse-
quently replaced by classrooms.










1880



It was an era when interest in
physical education was high,
occasioning the building of the new
gymnasium, or south wing, in
1883-4, together with Carter Hall.
In this gymnasium was a "ten-pin
alley," which remained until about
1912, and a "natatorium,"
Lasell's swimming pool. Mrs.
Spooner adds in her description of
this period: "A resident physician
looked after the health, habits of
dress, and recreation of the pupils.
With this care and regular hours
there were very few 'delicate' girls
left."

Almost fifteen years later the
26-member class of 1898 on its
graduation made it possible for
Bragdon to stretch to her full
rambling stature by making a gift of
$25,000— the largest of the then-
traditional class gifts ever presented
to the college. With this fund (which
they intended for a memorial hall with
a chapel, club rooms, and art
gallery) construction began the
following year on the south side of
the gymnasium, for an addition to
be connected to the main building by
a covered bridge. Above the ground
floor, which was set aside for a
bicycle room, were sorority rooms;



above that the auditorium was
extended and a stage built with a
large three-pipe manual organ at the
center, dressing rooms on either side,
and all the theatrical equipment
their successors could wish.

With that, her skeletal growth
was complete for a while, leaving only
the lower part of the east end
addition to the library to be completed
in 1914 and the upper part some years
later.



In 1881 technological develop-
ments began to make their imprint on
her way of life when the first school
telephone was installed in December,
opening communication between the
seminary and the larger towns between
Boston and Worcester. Mr. Ordway
writes that in 1903 this wall model
was the only telephone in the school.
In-house communication was
accomplished between kitchen and
boiler room and the "preceptress'
rooms" upstairs by whistle tube. In



1882-3





7883 1877



the laundry in the basement five
women did all the laundry for students,
help, and all the linen — a great deal
of which was hand ironing.

"At various times," he adds, "the
electrical requirements were taken
care of by our own plant. In 1903
electricity was generated by a 15
h.p. and 10 h.p. horseshoe generator
driven by single acting Westinghouse
2-cycle engines. In 1911 a Nash
25 h.p. engine and generator were
installed. This first was run on
distillate and then later changed to
gas. A storage battery was used to



take care of day and late night
loads." Later it was replaced by a
small gas engine-generator. Coal or
coke was used for fuel in both the
kitchen and oven in the bake shop,
located on the ground floor. Though
the kitchen ranges were converted
to gas later, the oven used hard fuel
as long is it was used. (This brick
construction, measuring about 10 x
10x7 feet, when demolished,
apparently supplied all the school's
brick needs for many years thereafter.)
In Carter a practice kitchen and
Home Economics department kitchen
depended on wood-burning stoves.



Change across the many decades
represented by a history now
spanning a grand 120 years, brought
many adaptations to the interior,
too. Walls were removed, rooms
rebuilt, new uses found for them.
The old chapel became the library,
then classrooms; the south side was
converted to classrooms and offices;
administrative offices were shifted
and eventually all moved to other
buildings as the campus spread
around the original "Seminary
Building" site. And to each generation
of students something will always be
remembered of how it once was.




16



FROM THE CAMPUS



Robin DeAngelis



Skating Class Introduced by Senior

It happens every Thursday . . .a
busload of Lasell Junior College girls,
carrying ice skates, head toward the
MDC rink at Cleveland Circle,
Brighton, to take an accredited course
in skating.

If we can't tell which is the
teacher, it's because she's one of
them. . . a liberal arts student at
Lasell Junior College, Robin
DeAngelis, 19, of 111 Silverbrook
Road, Milton.

Robin, who has been working on
her 7th figure skating test (the 8th is
the final and gold medal test) — has
decided she may turn professional.

She is the only Lasell student
ever to teach there and the class is
the school's first student-taught class.
There was a moment or two on the
first day when she must have
wondered whether it was a good idea.

On the first day of the assigned
class, she double checked on the
rink they were to have used. She was
more than chagrined when the
arrangements had to be changed
because of poor ice conditions for
figure skating. Last minute flurry of
telephone calls . . . inquiries . . . new
arrangements ... on her way. . . .

For the moment, she was calling
herself "Robin-Run-Ragged," but
since then, things have settled down,
and the girls tell her they are
enjoying and learning a lot.

"Of course, we haven't pro-
gressed much beyond the basic
stroking across the ice, and step, step,
glide," Robin explained. "None of the
girls have to cling to the barrier to
stay on their feet, so that's good,
and some would like to do more,
but I tell them there's no point going
on until they've really mastered one
phase."

This is a standard that the 5'3"
brunette has set for herself as well.
She has always felt she was
competing against herself in exhibition
skating, and was always trying harder.

"No skater is perfect," says
Robin. "The closest to it is Peggy
Fleming."



Skating seriously since she was
12, she participated in classes in
figure skating and free style skating
summers at Michigan State University
and at Troy, N.Y. and Rochester
Institute of Technology, Rochester,
N.Y.

Here, among other places, she
says she learned to value the student-
teacher relationship.

One of the lessons she learned
was to win or lose with a smile, not
too easy for anyone, let alone a really
serious teenager.

One way she gained extra under-
standing was to serve as a trial
judge — to sit in with the regular
judges on skating tests — to watch the
applicant and make her own decisions.
The decision of the trial judge is
only for herself and in no way affects
the outcome of the applicant's test.
A judge's lot is not an easy one.

Neither is a skater's if she wants
to improve all the time.

Robin's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph DeAngelis, have always been
pulling for her in practical ways.
"There were times I was discouraged
— if I failed a test, for example — and I
wanted to stop, they kept me going."

Also, Mrs. DeAngelis served as
chauffeur, seamstress and whatever
else was needed. Miniskirts were no
new thing for Robin, whose costumes
through the years were made by her
mother. She never liked micro-minis.

"Among other things," she said,
"skaters often don't have the legs
for them."

She enjoys maxi skirts, though,
and the only midi she'll consider is a
midi coat.

Robin was active in the Common-
wealth Skating Club of Weymouth
and is a member of the Boston Skating
Club.

She has skated in the New
England Regional Figure Skating
intermediate division and in the
novice ladies' class. She has also
been invited to skate in the Southern
New Hampshire skating shows by
Ray Hawes, director, "not as a




competitor or champion skater,"
emphasizes Robin, "but just as
myself."

She has always enjoyed dancing,
and her ballet lessons have stood
her in good stead on the rink. She is
also finding out the joy of interpreting
music through skating.

Skating is the medium in which
she communicates best, although she
has other interests. Fashion is one.
She was on the first teenage fashion
board at South Shore Plaza, and was
queen of the senior prom at Milton
High School one year.

In 1969, she was a Christmas
angel in the Boston Skating Club
pageant. Past angels, who skate to
carols and are always dressed in
shimmering white for the occasion,
have the privilege of choosing the
following year's angel.

Robin believes in starting
skating whether it's for pleasure or a
pleasant career, on neighborhood
ponds, as she did with her family.

Now, most of her spare time is
taken up with skating, although she
knits occasionally, makes time some-
how to date.

And it's not true that she only
dates skaters!

The above article, by Dorothy
Jacobsen, is reprinted here from the
Quincy Patriot Ledger.




MRS Ni:\NM/\H









tut—im



Jl




WOMEN IN POLITICS



/Wary B. Newman, former member of the Massachusetts
Legislature, shares some views on careers for women i
political offices.



During the spring there was considerable dialogue
on campus about careers for women, and although not
all the speakers were directing their remarks speci-
fically to a Lasell audience, their message was
pertinent to the broad issues of women's role and the
search for revelance in education today.

An impressive gathering of female talent at the Eighth
Annual conference on "Careers in Industry and
Business," held at Lasell during spring vacation, had
some particularly poignant insights to offer. Sponsored
by the Newton-Needham Chamber of Commerce in
cooperation with the Massachusetts Secondary School
Principals Association, the Massachusetts Association
of Women Deans and Counselors, and the Massa-
chusetts School Counselors Association, the confer-
ence this year drew approximately 200 high school
principals and counselors to hear panelists describe
"New Career Opportunities for Women."

With Pat Collins of WBZ-TV moderating the discus-
sion, two sets of panelists representing women in
advertising, banking, education, hotel and travel busi-
nesses, industry, and politics, painted a rather grim
picture of vestigial prejudice and stereotyping still
influencing women's opportunities across all of their
respective fields. They did offer the collective con-
clusion that with an overcompensating effort and
considerable sacrifice of personal life, women can
become successful, but only if they are willing to "try
harder."



While in the consensus of the panelists it is still
institutions, and specifically, stereotyping by male
administrators within these institutions, that account
for much of the inequality that persists in spite of
policy advances and invidual achievement, Mrs. Mary
B. Newman, speaking as a former member of the
Massachusetts legislature about careers for women in
politics, suggested that subtleties of attitudes among
members of both sexes may really be perpetuating the
static role of women today. Because her remarks reach
beyond politics into the nature of some of these at-
titudes, they have been included here in their entirety.

With Mrs. Newman on the panel were: Mrs. Frances
Fletcher, Innkeeper of the Holiday Inn, Newton; and
Mrs. Margaret Dezotell, Vice-Treasurer of the Newton
Savings Bank. The second panel included Miss Barbara
Bancroft, Office Manager of B.B.D.O. in Boston; Mrs.
Hope Danielson, Assistant Director of Personnel for
the Newton Public Schools; and Mrs. Barbara Mac-
Kinnon, Personnel Manager for the Sherman Division
of St. Regis Paper Co.



18



Mrs. Newman:

I was listening and realizing as I
heard the closing remarks of my
predecessor on the panel that, sure
enough, you can get trained for
banking, and you can get trained
for hotel work, there are a lot of
careers for women for which you can
go out and study to reassure and
prepare yourself. There's kind of a set
course about the whole thing. And
that cast a new light all of a sudden on
an old story.

I was talking with a group of
Harvard Law wives about ten years
ago, as bright, and heads up, and
interesting a group of gals as you'd
want to meet. And I was encouraging
them to get into politics. I was
talking about women in politics and
what it's like. Then in the question
period one of them said to me, in a
rather reproachful tone, "But, Mrs.
Newman, you talk as if all of us should
be willing to get into politics, and
you haven't asked if we're qualified
or not. Now, myself," she said, "I'm
not a lawyer, and I don't know
anything about taxes." I said, "Well,
honey, you know in the state
legislature — there are 240 people in
it — right at the moment 236 of them
are men and 4 of them are women in
the house; in the senate it's 39 to 1 .

Do you know how the average
guy got into the legislature? He
belonged to a fraternal organization
or veteran's group; so one of his
friends that he knew in the fraternal
organization or veteran's group
was in the legislature or on the
City Council. And some time before
elections one year he started to
help him by going out on the sound
truck or passing out cards or helping
them with their rallies in some
fashion. He did this for a couple of
elections and then his friend decided
to run for something else or dropped
out of politics and somebody said,
"Well, Bill, why don't you run, you
know everybody?" And he said, "I
think I will." He didn't ask anybody if
he knew anything about taxes or
whether he needed a law degree.

And in a basic sort of way I
think Bill's probably right. To be a



"To be a representative in government doesn't necessarily mean to be
a person who knows more than anybody else in the legislature. It's a
person who knows, and understands, and is trusted by the people
that he wants to represent."



". . . judgment, understanding, and call it integrity, are the three most
important things in the minds of people."



representative in government doesn't
necessarily mean to be a person
who knows more than anybody else
in the legislature. It's a person who
knows, and understands, and is
trusted by the people that he wants
to represent.

You know it's kind of startling to
think about those figures: four out of
240 in the house and one out of 40
in the senate. You know that women's
lib or no women's lib, we're a long
way from being a matriarchy in
Massachusetts; and what's more,
that's a decrease. The high at one
time was 2 women in the senate and 7
in the house. So we've come down
from 9 to 5, and at this rate of attrition
we're in a considerable amount of
trouble.

This is kind of surprising when
you think 53% of the voters in
Massachusetts are women. So, as
our moderator said, it's a question
of who wants to hire whom, but it's
not solely a question of who wants
to hire whom. It's also who wants to
go out and be hired.

When I think back to what our
foremothers, if I may call them that,
went through in order to get the vote
and to establish their right to be
persons in the United States of
America, I get a little embarrassed
sometimes about what some of us
think about, and are nervous about,
and are sort of self-conscious about,
here in 1971.

Some of you may know the name
of, or may even have known, Jennie
Loitmann Barron, a member of
the superior court — and a great
actress, really, the Bernhardt of the
Massachusetts bench. And I remember
a story she told about the time when,
as a young girl of 17 or 18, she was
working in a semester she took off
from Columbia, for women's suffrage



in Massachusetts. It was a Saturday
night in Davis Square in Somerville,
before the saloons had been closed,
and things were a little rough in Davis
Square. Jennie was standing up in
the back of an open touring car with
two other women in the front and a
woman sitting beside her. One of
the men, who had come out of one
of the saloons, was getting a little
bit rough in his talk; there was a
lot of laughing going on, and the
women were kind of nervous. One of
them said to Jennie, "If you can't keep
them quiet, we'd better move on,
I'm afraid the crowd's getting a little
bit restless." And Jennie Loitmann
Barron said, "and I looked at him,"
she said, "and it came to me, and I
said, 'That man can vote and my own
mother can't.' Well," she said, "they
almost lynched him."

Politics 50 years ago, when our
foremothers were fighting and working
so hard and so intelligently to get
the vote, was a pretty difficult field
for women. But I wonder if the time
hasn't come, now, that it's not only
almost demanded that we get into
politics, but it's also much easier.
Because politics has moved from
Davis Square on a Saturday night
in an open touring car, from the back
of a railroad train, pretty much into
people's living rooms. And I think
there is not a person in this room,
a man or woman, who hasn't got the
capacity, if this seems to be the thing
to be done, to relate to his or her
neighbors.

I think there are two real barriers
to the thought of women getting into
politics. The first is, as my young
friend from the Harvard Law wives
suggested, that we think too highly
of it: it's something that demands
some kind of training, some kind
of excellence, some kind of superior
knowledge.



19



The other, which is just as
compelling in the opposite direction,
perhaps more so, is the feeing that
politics is a pretty dirty business;
that it's conducted in smoke-filled
back rooms; that it's a matter of
deals and compromises; that really
nice people must have an awful time
when they get mixed up in that bunch
of thieves.

When I used to go out with the
League of Women voters and talk
about our legislative programs
and how we tried to influence people
to vote for certification of teachers
and better treatment of women
offenders and those things, someone
would often say to me, "Well, Mrs.
Newman, do you think of yourself
as a lobbyist?" and I'd say, "Yes" . . .
And the response would be, "Oh,
(gasp) you're one of those people."

When I got into the legislature
and began to talk to people about
what it was like to be in the
legislature; and somebody would
ask me, "But you don't think of
yourself as a politician do you?"
and I would say, "Yes," — the gasps
would be even louder. And I
would realize that one of the great
problems was that I had apparently
graduated without getting too much
tainted from pick-pocketing to
bankrobbing, but that I had entered
a fie'd which really shocks people,
that you thought of on a professional
level.

And I think this is one of the most
frightening things, and one of the
most serious lacks in our view of
politics. Because we think of the
institutionalized forms with which we
govern ourselves and our community
as being operated by a bunch of
people with whom a decent person
can not very easily associate,
we're leaving the most important
social activities of our community
lives pretty much at the mercy of
these people, and not caring who
they are. And if we don't care who
they are, we won't run, we won't go
out and work for others who do run;
we won't think of this as a place of
high calling to which people who



have this kind of idealism and the
kind of aspiration and ability that
we want, ought to aspire in order to be
elected.

What is it that people really are
looking for in their candidates? The
first time I ran for office in Cambridge,
I started out as everybody does
that reads the books and talks to
people, to ring doorbells. And I went
up and down in the ward that felt
itself the most isolated and called
itself the forgotten ward, handing
people my card saying, "I'm Mary
Newman, I'm a candidate for the
legislature, I've come to introduce
myself."

And while I was doing this (and
finding it scarey but very interesting),
I came across a friend of mine, a
woman who had been very active in
the League of Women Voters. She
said, "I understand you're ringing
doorbells. I think that's wonderful.
How many have you rung?" and I
said, "I guess about a 1000 so far."
And she said, "Well, now tell me,
what do you say when they ask you
what your platform is?" And I
thought, oh — and I knew her well,
she's an issue-oriented politician and
a scholar's wife — and I said,
"Elizabeth, I hate to tell you, but
nobody's asked me what my platform
is." She was really shocked . . .and
then she said, "You can't mean it.
Well then, is it just a matter of
popularity?" And I said, "No, I don't
think so." But she started me ques-
tioning.

In the next 1200 or so doorbells
I rang, I tried to listen beyond the
questions of, "Where did you get the
picture taken" and "You mean it's you
that's running and not your husband,"
and "Where do you live in Cambridge
dear," the typical questions you get
for the beginning of your call, . . .to
what was it that the voter was really
seeking when she or he had time to
ask me in for a few minutes of



conversation. And I came to realize,
to believe at least, and I have subse-
quently become more convinced this
is so, that the voter is nor an issue-
oriented person. In very rare cases
is there one single overriding issue
which is going to be the decisive one
in whether you vote for the person or
not. Nobody has time or knowledge
to keep a tally sheet and most people
know it.

What the voter is asking is, first of
all, perhaps: I don't know all the
things that are going to be coming up,
but is this the kind of person I want
to have making decisions for me,
on matters I don't know about? What
kind of judgment does she, or he,
have?

The second thing, I think was
brought out when people would tell
me about troubles that their cousin
had had, or their husband, or some-
one who couldn't get a job or who
had been sick, and it ran something
like this: I don't have anything
particularly bothering me right now,
but if I did have a problem, is this
the kind of a person who would care
what happens to me? There was a
kind of a search for understanding.

Third, and, I've come to believe
this is the most important: there were
people who started to find out how
you stood on something, then gave
you a violent argument, and watched
you like a hawk to see if you'd welch
on it. Those people, I think, were
looking for a kind of honesty, or a
kind of integrity; and they were saying,
am I going to get a straight story out
of this person, or am I just going to
get another run around when I have an
opinion?

So I think that judgment, under-
standing, and call it integrity, are the
three most important things in the
minds of people. And if you believe
that, then politics, responding to



20



these three qualities people are
seeking, becomes a high calling. And
if you're cynical about it, you're
letting your whole government and
community down.

Naturally if you go into politics as
a woman, you are going to have
problems. And I smile for myself. It's
as my predecessor [on the panel]
said, "you have to know a little bit
more." It's like running the 100-yard
dash, but you have to run 110 yards.
But it can be done. Sometimes you
hear people say, "It's too bad they
ever gave women the vote," and then
they turn around, and say, "Oh, but
I don't mean you. . . ."

I think that many men who go
into politics and find themselves in the
state legislature have thought of
politics as almost exclusively a
masculine area. And when they find
there are women here, their first
thought is — they're a little bit pleased;
they like to have a few. I don't know
what would be the maximum number
of women in the legislature from the
point of view of men — I'm pretty sure
four is too small.

But I think that we can no longer
overlook the fact that politics is a
time-consuming and important area
of our lives. And we can not any
longer overlook the fact that we can
not leave political service to those
who are eminent and successful — and
busy, among the male sex. Young
people and women must look at
themselves as part of a group from
which more qualified candidates are
available in the political sense. And
the candidate that's available is some-
body who has time to run, and will
run, that's electable, and could serve
if he was elected.

Now when you stop and think of
your ideal candidate you think of an
attractive man, he's someone between
35 and 45, he's probably got a college



"Naturally if you go into politics as a woman, you are going to have
problems. . . . It's like running the 100-yard dash, but you have to run
110 yards."



education. Of course, he's done
pretty well in the community, as a
civic leader. He's got a successful
business or profession, and you
think, wouldn't he be a marvelous
representative. So somebody goes
over and talks to him about running
for office and he says, "gee I can't,
I've got 3 kids getting ready to go to
college, one of them already in
college. . . I'm going to be a senior
partner in another year." He's up
to his ears in the kinds of things that
have made him the kind of person he
wants to be.

And sitting right across the room
from him, is Mrs. Potential. She's
been to college. She's been active in
all these civic things that he's been
active in. She's helped him in training
for his profession or worked with
him in starting his business. She has
just about every bit of the qualifications
that he has, and she probably knows
her neighbors a little bit better than
he does. Her three children are getting
ready to go to college too, and she's
got time to serve. If you went around
to any community and picked the
free-to-serve person, I think you'd get
a far better qualified person, who's
free-to-run, among the women.

Now I think we women have got
not ony the self-confidence but the
humility to see that this is a job that
needs to be done. But we don't have
to worry about whether we're going
to feel foolish. Of course, we're
going to feel foolish. Everybody feels
foolish. That's not important, you
get over it. You're going to have
butterflies in your stomach not just
the first time you talk but for the first
6 months that you talk. And every time



you talk in a new place for a long
time after that. But that's not important,
everybody does that and gets over
it.

I think what's held women back,
has been partly prejudice, of course.
Partly prejudice on the part of other
women? Of course, though there
are pluses. There are people who will
vote for you because you're a woman
just as much as there are people
who won't vote for you because you're
a woman. But basically, what has held
women back, I think, in the political
field is an understanding of the
need of our society, and the humility
as well as the concern which will
take you out to ring those first 1000
doorbells.



Question, from the floor: Mrs.
Newman, can you tell us something
about what a person can do to serve
government rather than in an elected
position?

I suppose there are three really
distinct areas of political work to be
done, one of which is avocational.
There are, of course, a great many
areas of work that do not involve
running for an elective office.

In the governor's staff, to a certain
extent the legislative staff, even in
the state legislature, and of course
quite extensively at the congressional
level, there are women and men
doing research, handling public
relations, writing speeches, carrying
on important legislative and admin-
istrative work. For this kind of career,
a woman would, in almost every
instance, I think, want to have some
kind of work beyond high school. I
think the college training is important:
work in government, in history, in
economics and statistics, would be an
extremely helpful step.



21



". . . we cannot leave political service to those who are eminent
and successful — and busy, among the male sex."



"But basically, what has held women back, I think, in the political
field is an understanding of the need of our society and the humility as
well as the concern which will take you out to ring those first 1000
doorbells."



A law degree is, I think, probably
less important than it seems. While in
one or two intern programs on the
congressional level that I've been
quite familiar with, they do take some
law students, they really prefer
students who are juniors in college,
who will have another year in which
to make use of the motivation they
acquired as summer interns, who
will come to work and think of them-
selves as people who have been
involved in research or administrative
work, rather than just in legal work.

There are in most legislatures,
including our own in Massachusetts,
some sorts of intern programs. Some
of them are summer intern programs;
some of them are year-round intern
programs which have been sponsored
by such foundations as the Ford
Foundation and others. Some of our
most intelligent and useful young
aides around the state house are
people who have come in through
these intern programs. The summer
one doesn't offer a very wide
opportunity. Last year I think they had
120 young people who passed the
examination and would have been
satisfactory on the interview, and they
found it possible to place about 15
of them in jobs for the summer, partly
because of budgetary problems.



Ten or fifteen years ago I was
told by a man within the state service
for some time, that the state was
really being run by about 100 people,
most of whom had come into state
service during the depression in the
30's, or just after. I came to identify
with these people. Most of them
retired and the others will retire in
the next 3 or 4 or 5 years. I can tell
you that there is a dire need in the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
for men and women who have the
same intelligence, capability and
dedication that those people are
taking away with them.

One of the big problems about
getting into state service is that so
much of it takes you through the
channels of civil service, and so much
of what is open in civil service, is at
the level of junior c!erk or senior clerk
typist, or the junior engineering aide,
something like that, from which you
move on. State salaries in those
middle grades are not very inspiring
to young people today — not even
female young people today.

But it's an area in which you
have a tremendous demand and
there's a growing gap — if a vacuum
can grow, we've got one growing.
And if it isn't filled the state service is
going to fail much more seriously
than it has in the last 15 to 20 years.

I suggest to you that now we need
two things in this area. We need the
vocational aspiration of people who
want to give their time and energies
to government. We need the
avocational efforts of those who want
to make the civil service responsive,
opening the doors for these people.



22



IN MEMORIAM



Alumnae

Mabel Taylor Gannett '95 on March
16, 1971 in Manhasset, N.Y.

Ruth Crandell '98 on November 5,
1966 in Newton, Mass.

Elsie Young Hayden '06 on January

23, 1971 in Nashua, N.H.
Elsie Davenport Hilliard x-'08 on

November 4, 1970 in Peoria,

III.
Ethel McCorkindale Harwood x-'08

on January 27, 1971 in

Hampden, Mass.

Frances Ebersole Hall '09 on March
12, 1971 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Mary Starr Utter Maxson '12 on
December 23, 1970 in Wester-
ly, R.I.

Sara Shuttleworth Houwert x-'12 on
November 4, 1969 in Amster-
dam, N.Y.

Gladys Burnet Watts '20 on August
9, 1970 in Knightstown, Ind.

Mildred Harvey Ecker x-'22 on
March 9, 1971 in Toledo, Ohio.

Marion T. Weidman x-'22 on Decem-
ber 14, 1970 in Rockport,
Maine.

Dorothy Messenger Heath '26 on
January 16, 1971 in Goffstown,
N.H.

Minerva Pritchard Barratt '32 on
September 15, 1970 in Vero
Beach, Fla.

Janet McCartney Abel x-'32 on
November 25, 1967.

Mary Dunn Porte x-'38 on March 7,
1971 in St. Louis, Mo.

Arlene Ryan Henry '41 on February
21, 1971 in Framingham,
Mass.

Jacqueline Darcy '46 on January 17,
1971 in Gloucester, Mass.

Mr. Wilder N. Smith (Trustee 1951-
71) on April 6, 1971 in Sara-
sota, Fla.

Mr. Leonard P. Wolfe (Trustee 1956-
71) on February 15, 1971 in
Bedford, Mass.



Wilder N. Smith







i*/***"




On April 6, 1971 Lasell lost a devoted friend
when Wilder N. Smith, former Chairman of
the Board of Trustees, died after a short
illness at the Sarasota Memorial Hospital
near his Florida retirement home.

Elected to the Board of Trustees in 1950, he
served the College for twelve years as both
Vice-President of the Corporation and a
member of the Finance Committee. In 1962
he was named Chairman of the Board,
succeeding the late Priscilla Alden Wolfe '19.
He remained Chairman until his retirement in
1969.

A leader in the Boston retail community,
Mr. Smith was treasurer and comptroller of the
Gilchrist Company with which he was
associated for 44 years. He graduated from
the Boston University School of Business
Administration and later also became president
of the Credit Bureau, treasurer of the Retail
Trade Board, and president of the Charga-
Plate Associates.

Last year the Board of Management of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc. awarded Mr. Smith a Medallion
at its 1970 Annual Alumnae Council Meeting
in grateful recognition of his long and
dedicated service to Lasell with the following
citation: "Upon his retirement as Chairman
of the Board we wish to say thank you for
a job most well done. It is a distinct privilege
for Lasell Alumnae, Incorporated to award
a Medallion to this loyal and devoted friend
who has given so untiringly of himself to
promote and sustain the good name of Lasell."

Mr. Smith is survived by his wife, Antoinette
Meritt Smith '23, also a former trustee and
member of the Board of Management of Lasell
Alumnae, Inc. until her retirement in 1970.



23



CLUBS



Florida

Florida Gold Coast Club held its
Annual Meeting on Saturday,
February 6 at Heilman's Restaurant
in Fort Lauderdale. Special recog-
nition was given to Lela Cones
Shaffer, a member of the Class of
1906 and to Betty Wells Tuttle '29,
who traveled the furthest distance.
The group is looking forward to
meeting Dr. and Mrs. Greene at
next year's Luncheon.



Western Massachusetts

Mrs. William E. Roy (Betty Smith
'43) entertained Western Massa-
chusetts Club at her home for
Luncheon on Wednesday, March
17. Guests of honor were Dr. and
Mrs. Greene.



CLASS NOTES





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Alumnae guests of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Gregorian at the Kahala Hilton in Honolulu
this February were: (left to right) Helen Duncan Devereaux '26; Janet Woodward Powers
'51, daughter Kathie (a sophomore at Panahou), Molly Ing Louis '46, Mr. Gregorian,
Brook Young (a senior at Panahou), and Mrs. Gregorian.



'04

On January 17 the Waltham Hospital dedicated its new building, the Walter R.
Amesbury Building in honor of Walter Raleigh Amesbury who served as Comp-
troller of the hospital from 1930 to 1933, Administrator from 1941 to 1959, and
Treasurer from 1933 to 1970.

Mr. and Mrs. Amesbury (Jane Ford Amesbury x-'04) attended the special
January dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremonies where Mr. Amesbury
received a silver tray marking his years of service to the hospital and bearing
the inscription:

In grateful recognition of over 40 years of service to The Waltham Hospital

and upon the occasion of the dedication of the Amesbury Building. The

Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees have hereunto affixed their

signatures.

Their fourteen signatures were engraved on the tray informally around the

inscription. Mr. and Mrs. Amesbury's daughter, Virginia Amesbury Stone, was

graduated from Lasell in the class of '38.



'13

Ruth Stokes Crick x-'13 writes: "I
am enclosing a clipping from the
Middletown (Penna.) Journal that I
think might be of interest to any
Lasell-mates that may remember me.
My roommate was the late Ruth
Ketcham from Oak Park, Illinois. We
shared the same first names and the
same birth dates." The clipping was
a picture of Mrs. Crick displaying a
sugar bowl and cream pitcher given
her by Major and Mrs. Stuart Roosa
and family. Mrs. Crick recalls her
"baby-sitting" days for the Roosa
family when they resided at Meade
Heights. Major Roosa was command
module pilot for the Apollo 14 flight.

(Lasell has another "contact" with
Apollo 14: Capt. Alan Shepard's



24



grandmother, the late Anna Bart-
lett Shepard, attended the Sem-
inary in 1878-80. Ed.)