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WAIS-IV WMS-IV sample report

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Interpretive Report of WAIS–IV and WMS–IV Testing
Examinee and Testing Information
Examinee Name Sample Examinee Date of Report 7/1/2009 Examinee ID 12345 Years of Education 11 Date of Birth 3/24/1988 Home Language English Gender Male Handedness Right Race/Ethnicity White Examiner Name Sample Examiner Test Administered WAIS–IV (6/23/2009) Age at Testing 21 years 2 months Retest? No WMS–IV (6/23/2009) 21 years 2 months No WAIS–IV Comments Sample Comments.
WMS–IV Comments
The Examinee attended the session alone and was cooperative and gave his best effort during testing.
Purpose for Evaluation
Sample was referred for an evaluation by Sample Referral, his counselor, secondary to School-Related difficulties specifically related to learning and attention.
Background
Sample is a 21-year-old single male who lives alone. Sample completed the 11th grade. Sample has a current diagnosis of ADHD and is currently being treated with medication. In addition to his current treatment, he has previously been treated with medication. Sample has no major medical problems. Sample is currently employed full-time as a(n) construction worker. It is reported that his work performance is unsatisfactory.
Test Session Behavior: WAIS–IV
Sample arrived on time for the test session unaccompanied. His appearance was neat. He was oriented to person, place, time and situation. Sample exhibited difficulties with attention during testing which may have had a minimal effect on his ability to attend to the tasks and thus negatively affected his overall performance.
Test Session Behavior: WMS–IV
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Sample arrived on time for the test session unaccompanied. His appearance was neat.
Interpretation of WAIS–IV Results
General Intellectual Ability
Sample��s unique set of thinking and reasoning abilities make his overall intellectual functioning difficult to summarize by a single score on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–Fourth Edition (WAIS–IV). His nonverbal reasoning abilities are much better developed than his verbal reasoning abilities. Processing complex visual information by forming spatial images of part-whole relationships and/or by manipulating the parts to solve novel problems without using words is a strength. Making sense of complex verbal information and using verbal abilities to solve novel problems are less developed abilities for Sample.
Verbal Comprehension
Sample��s verbal reasoning abilities as measured by the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) are in the average range and above those of approximately 68% of his peers (VCI = 107; 95% confidence interval = 101-112). The VCI is designed to measure verbal reasoning and concept formation. Sample performed comparably on the verbal subtests contributing to the VCI, suggesting that the various verbal cognitive abilities measured by these subtests are similarly developed. Furthermore, he may experience little or no difficulty in keeping up with his peers in situations that require verbal skills.
Perceptual Reasoning
Sample��s nonverbal reasoning abilities as measured by the Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI) are in the superior range and above those of approximately 94% of his peers (PRI =123; 95% confidence interval = 116-128). The PRI is designed to measure fluid reasoning in the perceptual domain with tasks that assess nonverbal concept formation, visual perception and organization, visual-motor coordination, learning, and the ability to separate figure and ground in visual stimuli. Sample presents a diverse set of nonverbal abilities, performing much better on some nonverbal tasks than others. The degree of variability is unusual for individuals his age and may be noticeable to those who know him well. Sample performed much better on the Block Design subtest when speed of performance is considered (Block Design = 16; Block Design No Time Bonus = 14). This variability is quite unusual in general, and worthy of further investigation. Sample��s performance was significantly better on the Visual Puzzles and Block Design subtests than his own mean score. Furthermore, he performed much better than most of his peers, thus demonstrating very strong abilities on the Visual Puzzles and Block Design subtests. The Block Design subtest required Sample to use two-color cubes to construct replicas of two- dimensional, geometric patterns. This subtest assesses nonverbal fluid reasoning and the ability to mentally organize visual information. More specifically, this subtest assesses his ability to analyze part-whole relationships when information is presented spatially. Performance on this task also may be influenced by visual-spatial perception and visual perception-fine motor coordination, as well as planning ability (Block Design scaled score = 16). The Visual Puzzles subtest required Sample to view a completed puzzle and select three response options that, when combined, reconstruct the puzzle, and

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do so within a specified time limit. This subtest is designed to measure nonverbal reasoning and the ability to analyze and synthesize abstract visual stimuli. Performance on this task also may be influenced by visual perception, broad visual intelligence, fluid intelligence, simultaneous processing, spatial visualization and manipulation, and the ability to anticipate relationships among parts (Visual Puzzles scaled score = 15).
Working Memory
Sample��s ability to sustain attention, concentrate, and exert mental control is in the average range. He performed better than approximately 30% of his peers in this area (Working Memory Index (WMI) = 92; 95% confidence interval 86-99). Sample��s abilities to sustain attention, concentrate, and exert mental control are a weakness relative to his nonverbal and verbal reasoning abilities. A relative weakness in mental control may make the processing of complex information more time-consuming for Sample, draining his mental energies more quickly as compared to others at his level of ability, and perhaps result in more frequent errors on a variety of learning or complex work tasks. Sample was referred for this evaluation because it is suspected that he may have attention difficulties. His score profile is consistent with this possibility. The pattern of weaker performance on mental control and processing speed tasks than on reasoning tasks occurs more often among individuals with attention deficits and hyperactive behavior than among those without these difficulties.
Processing Speed
Sample��s ability in processing simple or routine visual material without making errors is in the low average range when compared to his peers. He performed better than approximately 14% of his peers on the processing speed tasks (Processing Speed Index [PSI] = 84; 95% confidence interval 77-94). Processing visual material quickly is an ability that Sample performs poorly as compared to his verbal and nonverbal reasoning ability. Processing speed is an indication of the rapidity with which Sample can mentally process simple or routine information without making errors. Because learning often involves a combination of routine information processing (such as reading) and complex information processing (such as reasoning), a weakness in the speed of processing routine information may make the task of comprehending novel information more time-consuming and difficult for Sample. Thus, this weakness in simple visual scanning and tracking may leave him less time and mental energy for the complex task of understanding new material. The learning difficulty noticed by Sample��s counselor may be related to his lower mental control and processing speed abilities. This pattern of mental control and visual processing speed abilities that are both less developed than the individual��s reasoning ability is more common among individuals with learning disabilities than among those without such disabilities.
Summary
Sample was referred for an evaluation by Sample Referral, his counselor, secondary to School-Related difficulties specifically related to learning and attention. Sample is a 21-year-old male who completed the WAIS–IV. His overall cognitive ability, as evaluated by the WAIS–IV, cannot easily be summarized because his nonverbal reasoning abilities are much better developed than his verbal reasoning abilities. Sample��s reasoning abilities on verbal tasks are generally in the average range (VCI = 107), while his nonverbal reasoning abilities are significantly higher and in the superior range (PRI = 123). This pattern of scores is consistent with the learning difficulties noted by Sample��s counselor. Sample��s ability to sustain attention, concentrate, and exert mental control is in the average

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range (WMI = 92). Sample��s ability in processing simple or routine visual material without making errors is in the low average range when compared to his peers (PSI = 84).
Interpretation of WMS–IV Results
Sample was administered 10 subtests of the Adult battery of the Wechsler Memory Scale–Fourth Edition (WMS–IV), from which his index scores were derived. He was also administered the Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE), an optional procedure measuring global cognitive functioning. Sample��s scores on the WMS–IV indexes are discussed in the following sections of this report, as are discrepancies in performance across different modalities and categories of memory processes. In addition, specific strengths and deficits within modalities are discussed. When interpreting performance on the WMS–IV, it is important to take into consideration factors that may have contributed to Sample��s test performance, such as difficulties with vision, hearing, motor functioning, English language proficiency, and speech/language functioning. In addition, personal factors, such as physical illness, fatigue, headache, or factors specific to the testing session such as distractions or a lack of motivation, can affect performance on any given day. According to the information provided, Sample��s performance may have been affected by the following issue. He experienced difficulties paying attention during testing, which may have diminished his concentration and ability to attend to instructions and stimuli and appeared to have a minimal effect on his overall performance.
Brief Cognitive Status Exam
The Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) evaluates basic cognitive functions through tasks that assess orientation to time, incidental recall, mental control, planning/visual perceptual processing, inhibitory control, and verbal productivity. Sample��s global cognitive functioning, as measured by the BCSE, was in the Average range, compared to others, ages 16 to 29, with a similar educational background. This classification level represents 25–100% of cases within his age and education group. Functioning in this range is not typically associated with global impairments in cognitive functioning.
Auditory Memory
The Auditory Memory Index (AMI) is a measure of Sample��s ability to listen to oral information, repeat it immediately, and then recall the information after a 20 to 30 minute delay. Compared to other individuals his age, Sample's auditory memory capacity is in the High Average range (AMI = 115, 95% Confidence Interval = 108-120) and exceeds that of approximately 84 percent of individuals in his age group. However, it is important to note that the severe attention difficulties that Sample appeared to experience during the assessment are suspected of having had a minimal effect on his ability to fully express his auditory memory capacity. In spite of these observed difficulties, Sample performed in the High Average range, and his scores in this area may have been even higher in the absence of these difficulties. The interpretation of Sample��s AMI score should account for the significant inconsistency in performance on specific measures within this domain. A closer look at these subtests is warranted. Within auditory memory, Sample exhibited a strength on the Logical Memory II subtest. At the same time, he displayed a relative weakness on the Verbal Paired Associates I subtest and a relative weakness on the Verbal Paired Associates II subtest. On Logical Memory II, Sample was asked to recall specific details of information presented orally in a story format in a single exposure after a 20

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to 30 minute delay. This subtest measures the ability to recall verbal information that is conceptually organized and semantically related after a delay (Logical Memory II scaled score = 16). Verbal Paired Associates I required Sample to recall novel and semantically related word pairs. This subtest measures immediate learning of verbal associations over multiple exposures (Verbal Paired Associates I scaled score = 10). On Verbal Paired Associates II, Sample was required to recall novel and semantically related word pairs after a 20 to 30 minute delay. This subtest provides a measure of delayed cued recall for word associations (Verbal Paired Associates II scaled score = 9). To determine if Sample��s auditory memory capacity is consistent with his general intellectual ability, a comparison between his GAI and AMI index scores is recommended. Sample��s performance on the GAI and AMI indicate that his ability to recall information presented orally is comparable to his level of general intellectual ability (GAI = 117; AMI = 115). Sample��s ability to recall information presented orally is in the High Average range when compared others with similar general intellectual ability (75th percentile). This result indicates no significant difference between his auditory memory and general intellectual functioning (GAI vs. AMI Contrast Scaled Score = 12). Sample��s ability to recall information presented orally is in the High Average range when compared to others with similar verbal comprehension (84th percentile). This result indicates that his auditory memory is somewhat better than expected, given his level of verbal comprehension (VCI vs. AMI Contrast Scaled Score = 13). Sample��s ability to recall orally presented information is in the Superior range when compared to others with similar auditory working memory capacity (91st percentile). This result indicates that his auditory memory is much better than expected, given his level of auditory working memory (WMI vs. AMI Contrast Scaled Score = 14).
Visual Memory
On the Visual Memory Index (VMI), a measure of memory for visual details and spatial location, Sample performed in the Average range (VMI = 95, 95% Confidence Interval = 90-101). Sample's visual memory capacity exceeds that of approximately 37 percent of individuals in his age group. However, it is important to note that the attention difficulties that Sample appeared to experience during the assessment are suspected of having had a minimal effect on his ability to fully express his visual memory capacity. In spite of these observed difficulties, Sample performed in the Average range, and his scores in this area may have been even higher in the absence of these difficulties. The interpretation of Sample��s VMI score should account for the significant inconsistency in performance on specific measures within this domain. A closer look at these subtests is warranted. Within visual memory, Sample exhibited a strength on the Visual Reproduction II subtest. However, he displayed a weakness on the Designs I subtest. On Designs I Sample was required to recall designs and their locations in a grid immediately after seeing them. This subtest measures spatial recall and memory for visual details (Designs I scaled score = 5). Visual Reproduction II required Sample to recall designs viewed and drawn 20 to 30 minutes earlier, without any visual cues. This subtest measures the ability to freely recall and reproduce visual information, without prompting, after a delay (Visual Reproduction II scaled score = 14). To determine if Sample��s visual memory function is consistent with his general intellectual ability, a comparison between his performance on the VMI and GAI is recommended. Sample��s ability to recall

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information presented visually is significantly lower than expected when compared to his general intellectual ability (GAI = 117; VMI = 95). Furthermore, such difference is rare and may be noticeable to those close to him. Sample��s ability to recall orally presented information is in the Low Average range when compared to others with similar general intellectual functioning (9th percentile). This result indicates that his visual memory is lower than expected, given his level of general intellectual functioning (GAI vs. VMI Contrast Scaled Score = 6). Sample��s ability to recall information presented orally is in the Borderline range when compared to others with similar perceptual reasoning ability (5th percentile). This result indicates that his visual memory is much lower than expected, given his level of perceptual reasoning ability (PRI vs. VMI Contrast Scaled Score = 5).
Modality-Specific Memory Strengths and Weaknesses
Some individuals are better at recalling visual information than recalling auditory information, while for others the reverse is true. Compared to individuals with similar auditory memory capacity, Sample��s visual memory performance is in the Average range (25th percentile), indicating no significant difference between his levels of visual and auditory memory functioning. The interpretation of Sample��s modality-specific memory strengths and weaknesses should take into account the previously mentioned difficulties which may have affected his performance.
Visual Working Memory
On the Visual Working Memory Index (VWMI), a measure of his ability to temporarily hold and manipulate spatial locations and visual details, Sample performed in the Average range (VWMI = 94, 95% Confidence Interval = 87-102). Sample��s visual working memory ability exceeds that of approximately 34 percent of individuals in his age group. However, it is important to note that the attention difficulties that Sample appeared to experience during the assessment are suspected of having had a minimal effect on his ability to fully express his visual working memory capacity. In spite of these observed difficulties, Sample performed in the High Average range, and his scores in this area may have been even higher in the absence of these difficulties. Sample��s performance on the Symbol Span subtest was significantly better than his performance on the Spatial Addition subtest, suggesting that his profile of memory functioning within visual working memory exhibits significant variability. Therefore, a closer look at these two subtests is warranted. On Spatial Addition, Sample was shown patterns of blue and red circles on two grids presented consecutively. He was then required to place cards with different colored circles in a grid according to a set of rules, based on the grids that he had been shown. This subtest measures spatial working memory and requires storage, manipulation, and the ability to ignore competing stimuli (Spatial Addition scaled score = 6). Symbol Span required Sample to identify a series of novel symbols, in order from left to right, immediately after seeing the symbols in their correct order. This subtest measures the capacity to keep a mental image of a symbol and its relative spatial position on the page in mind (Symbol Span scaled score = 12). To determine if Sample��s working memory capacity for visual information is consistent with his general intellectual ability, a comparison between his performance on the VWMI and GAI is recommended. Sample��s working memory capacity for visual information is significantly lower than expected, given his general intellectual ability (GAI = 117; VWMI = 94). Furthermore, such difference is rare and may be noticeable to those close to him. Sample��s working memory capacity for

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visual information is in the Low Average range when compared to others with similar general intellectual functioning (9th percentile). This result indicates that his working memory capacity for visual information is lower than expected, given his level of general intellectual functioning (GAI vs. VWMI Contrast Scaled Score = 6). Sample��s working memory capacity for visual information is in the Borderline range when compared to others of similar perceptual reasoning ability (5th percentile). This result indicates that his working memory capacity for visual information is much lower than expected, given his level of perceptual reasoning ability (PRI vs. VMI Contrast Scaled Score = 5). To determine if Sample��s auditor working memory function is consistent with his visual working memory ability, a comparison between his WMI and VWMI index scores is recommended. Sample��s working memory capacity for visual information is in the Average range when compared to others with similar auditory working memory capacity (50th percentile). This result suggests that there is no significant difference between his working memory capacity for visually or orally presented information (WMI vs. VWMI Contrast Scaled Score = 10).
Specificity of Episodic Visual Memory Abilities Compared to Visual Working Memory Abilities
Comparing episodic visual memory to visual working memory performance can help determine the relative influence of visual memory on visual working memory (e.g., to determine if a low VMI score is due to deficits in visual working memory or to episodic visual memory deficits). Compared to individuals with similar visual working memory capacity, Sample��s visual memory performance is in the Average range (50th percentile), indicating no significant difference between his levels of visual memory and visual working memory functioning.
Immediate and Delayed Memory
The Immediate Memory Index (IMI) is a measure of Sample��s ability to recall verbal and visual information immediately after the stimuli is presented. Compared to other individuals his age, Sample's immediate memory capacity is in the Average range (IMI = 102, 95% Confidence Interval = 96-108) and exceeds that of approximately 55 percent of individuals in his age group. On the Delayed Memory Index (DMI), a measure of the ability to recall verbal and visual information after a 20 to 30 minute delay, Sample performed in the High Average range (DMI = 110, 95% Confidence Interval= 103-116). Sample's delayed memory capacity exceeds that of approximately 75 percent of individuals in his age group. However, it is important to note that the severe attention difficulties that Sample appeared to experience during the assessment are suspected of having had a minimal effect on his immediate and delayed memory functioning. In spite of these observed difficulties, Sample performed in the Average range of immediate memory functioning and in the High Average range of delayed memory functioning, and his scores in these areas may have been even higher in the absence of these difficulties. The interpretation of Sample��s IMI score should account for the significant inconsistency in performance on specific measures within this domain. A closer look at these subtests is warranted. Within immediate memory, Sample exhibited a strength on the Logical Memory I subtest. He displayed a weakness on the Designs I subtest. Logical Memory I required Sample to recall specific details of information presented orally in a story format after only a single exposure. This subtest

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measures the ability to recall verbal information that is conceptually organized and semantically related immediately after hearing it (Logical Memory I scaled score = 15). To determine if Sample��s immediate memory recall ability is consistent with his general intellectual functioning, a comparison between his performance on the GAI and IMI is recommended. Sample��s performance indicates that his ability to recall information immediately after its presentation is comparable to his level of general intellectual functioning (GAI = 117; IMI = 102). Sample��s ability to recall information immediately after its presentation is in the Average range when compared to others of similar general intellectual functioning (25th percentile). This result suggests there is no significant difference between his immediate memory recall and general intellectual functioning (GAI vs. IMI Contrast Scaled Score = 8). In order to determine if Sample��s memory recall after a 20–30 minute delay is consistent with his general intellectual ability, a comparison between his GAI and DMI index scores is recommended. Sample��s performance indicates that his ability to recall information after a delay is comparable to his level of general intellectual functioning (GAI = 117; DMI = 110). Sample��s ability to recall information after a delay is in the Average range when compared to others of similar general intellectual ability (50th percentile). This result suggests there is no significant difference between his delayed memory recall and general intellectual functioning (GAI vs. DMI Contrast Scaled Score = 10).
Retention of Information
Some individuals lose information between immediate and delayed recall, while others actually improve their memory performance over time. The overall amount of forgetting and consolidation that occurred between the immediate and delayed tasks is indicated by the level of Sample��s delayed memory performance given his immediate memory performance. Compared to individuals with a similar level of immediate memory capacity, Sample��s delayed memory performance is in the High Average range (84th percentile), indicating that his delayed memory is somewhat better than expected, given his level of initial encoding.
Specific Auditory Memory Abilities
Auditory Process Scores
On a measure of his ability to answer specific questions about details from a previously heard story, Sample performed in the high average range (LM II Recognition cumulative percentage = >75%). Sample performed in the extremely low range on a measure of his ability to identify previously presented word associations (VPA II Recognition cumulative percentage = ��2%). When asked to recall as many words as he could remember from a previously presented list of word pairs, without being required to correctly associate the words, Sample performed in the average range (VPA II Word Recall scaled score = 8).
Auditory Forgetting and Retrieval Scores
The degree to which Sample may benefit from story details being presented in a recognition format instead of a free recall format can be determined by comparing his delayed cued recall performance to that of individuals with a similar level of recognition memory (LM II Recognition vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 16). This comparison suggests that Sample may have better free recall than

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recognition for story details. This is unusual, because most individuals perform better when asked specific questions about a story than when asked to recall story details with no cues. The degree to which Sample forgot the story details he learned during the immediate condition of Logical Memory I can be determined by comparing his delayed recall performance to that of others with a similar level of immediate recall (LM II Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 13). This comparison indicates that Sample has relatively good delayed recall, given his initial level of recall. The degree to which Sample may benefit from word associations being presented in recognition format versus cued recall can be determined by comparing his delayed cued recall performance to that of individuals with a similar level of recognition memory (VPA II Recognition vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 16). Based on this comparison, Sample��s cued recall for word associations may be better than his recognition memory. This is unusual, and suggests that for Sample, the recognition format may interfere with memory retrieval. The degree to which Sample forgot the word associations he learned during immediate recall of Verbal Paired Associates I can be determined by comparing his delayed recall performance to that of others with a similar level of immediate recall (VPA II Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 8). This comparison indicates that Sample is able to recall cued word associations after a delay as well as expected, given his level of immediate recall.
Specific Visual Memory Abilities
Visual Process Scores
Sample��s immediate and delayed memory for visual details are both below average, suggesting that he may have general difficulties recalling specific visual information when compared to individuals his age (DE I Content scaled score = 4, DE II Content scaled score = 7). When required to recall designs and their locations in a grid, Sample��s immediate and delayed memory for the locations of cards placed in the grid, regardless of his ability to recall the visual details of the cards, are both below average, suggesting that he may have general difficulty recalling spatial locations when compared to individuals his age (DE I Spatial scaled score = 3, DE II Spatial scaled score = 7). On a measure of his ability to recognize designs previously presented and the correct locations for the designs, Sample performed in the high average range when compared to others his age (DE II Recognition cumulative percentage = >75%). When required to simply copy designs as he looked at them, Sample was able to perform the task as well as or better than 3-9% percent of individuals his age. It should be noted that Sample��s performance on the memory portions of the Visual Reproduction subtest may be confounded by his poor copying ability.
Visual Forgetting and Retrieval Scores
Sample��s immediate recall of visual details is below average when compared to others with similar levels of immediate spatial memory ability. His delayed recall of visual details is average when compared to others with similar levels of delayed spatial memory ability. Sample��s level of free recall for visual details and spatial locations relative to his recognition memory for this visual information can be determined by comparing his delayed recall performance to that of individuals with a similar level of recognition memory (DE II Recognition vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 5). This comparison indicates that his free recall for visual information is lower than expected, given his recognition memory. The degree to which Sample forgot the visual details and spatial locations he

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learned during the immediate condition of the Designs subtest can be determined by comparing his delayed recall performance to that of individuals with a similar level of immediate memory (DE Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 11). Based on this comparison, Sample is able to recall visual details and spatial locations after a delay as well as expected, given his level of immediate recall. When compared to others with a similar level of simple copying ability, Sample��s ability to immediately recall and draw the details and relative spatial relationships among elements of a design is very good considering his level of copying ability (VR II Copy vs. Immediate Recall contrast scaled score = 15). The degree to which Sample forgot the details and relative spatial relationship among elements of the designs presented during the immediate recall of the Visual Reproduction subtest can be determined by comparing his ability to recall and draw the designs after a delay to that of individuals with a similar level of immediate ability (VR Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall contrast scaled score = 14). Based on this comparison, his delayed recall for this type of visual information is above average. This suggests that the interval between immediate and delayed recall may benefit Sample by providing time for him to consolidate his ability to recall and draw the designs.
Summary of WMS–IV Memory Abilities
Sample is a 21-year-old male who completed the WMS–IV. Sample was referred for an evaluation by Sample Referral, his counselor, secondary to School-Related difficulties specifically related to learning and attention. When reviewing Sample��s results, it is important to keep in mind the previously noted factors that may have affected his test performance. Sample was administered 10 subtests of the Adult battery of the WMS–IV. Sample��s global cognitive functioning as measured by the BCSE was in the Average range, compared to others ages 16 to 29 and of a similar educational background. Sample's ability to listen to oral information and repeat it immediately, and then recall the information after a 20 to 30 minute delay is in the High Average range. His memory for visual details and spatial location is in the Average range. His ability to temporarily hold and manipulate spatial locations and visual details is in the Average range. Sample��s ability to recall verbal and visual information immediately after the stimuli is presented is in the Average range. His ability to recall verbal and visual information after a 20 to 30 minute delay is in the High Average range. Sample displayed a notable amount of consolidation between the immediate and delayed tasks of the WMS–IV. Compared to individuals with a similar level of immediate memory capacity, Sample��s delayed memory performance is in the High Average range, indicating that his delayed memory is somewhat better than expected given his level of initial encoding.
Summary of Intellectual and Memory Abilities
A comparison of Sample��s auditory memory ability (AMI) to his results on WAIS–IV revealed that he performed within the expected range when compared to his general intellectual functioning. The adjustment of Sample��s AMI result by his verbal comprehension ability generated a contrast scaled score in the High Average range, indicating that his auditory memory is somewhat better than expected. The adjustment of Sample��s AMI result by his working memory ability (WMI) generated a contrast scaled score in the Superior range, indicating that his auditory memory is much better than expected. A comparison of Sample��s visual memory (VMI) to his results on WAIS–IV revealed that he performed significantly outside the expected range when compared to his general intellectual

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functioning. The adjustment of Sample��s VMI result by his general intellectual ability (GAI) generated a contrast scaled score in the Low Average range, indicating that his visual memory is lower than expected. The adjustment of Sample��s VMI result by his perceptual reasoning (PRI) generated a contrast scaled score is in the Borderline range, indicating that his visual memory is much lower than expected. A comparison of Sample��s visual working memory (VWMI) to his results on WAIS–IV revealed that he performed significantly outside the expected range when compared to his general intellectual functioning. The adjustment of Sample��s VWMI results by his general intellectual ability generated a contrast scaled score is in the High Average range, indicating that his visual working memory is lower than expected. The adjustment of Sample��s VWMI result by his perceptual reasoning ability (PRI) generated a contrast scaled score in the Borderline range, indicating that his visual working memory is much lower than expected. A comparison of Sample��s immediate memory recall (IMI) to his results on WAIS–IV revealed that he performed within the expected range when compared to his general intellectual functioning. A comparison of Sample��s delayed memory recall (DMI) to his results on the WAIS–IV revealed that he performed within the expected range when compared to his general intellectual functioning.
Recommendations
Sample is encouraged to study or work in an area with few visual and auditory distractions. Provide Sample with a mixture of tasks that are of both high- and low-interest to him. This report is valid only if signed by a qualified professional:
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Score Report
WAIS–IV Results
Composite Score Summary
Scale Sum of Scaled Scores Composite Score Percentile Rank 95% Confidence Interval Qualitative Description
Verbal Comprehension 34 VCI 107 68 101-112 Average Perceptual Reasoning 42 PRI 123 94 116-128 Superior Working Memory 17 WMI 92 30 86-99 Average Processing Speed 14 PSI 84 14 77-94 Low Average Full Scale 107 FSIQ 104 61 100-108 Average General Ability 76 GAI 117 87 112-121 High Average Confidence Intervals are based on the Overall Average SEMs. Values reported in the SEM column are based on the examinee��s age. The GAI is an optional composite summary score that is less sensitive to the influence of working memory and processing speed. Because working memory and processing speed are vital to a comprehensive evaluation of cognitive ability, it should be noted that the GAI does not have the breadth of construct coverage as the FSIQ.

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Composite Scores and Standard Error of Measurement
Composite Score
SEM
VCI 107 3 PRI 123 3.67 WMI 92 4.24 PSI 84 4.74 FSIQ 104 2.12 GAI 117 2.6
Composite Score Profile
The vertical bars represent the standard error of measurement (SEM).
Index Level Discrepancy Comparisons
Comparison Score 1 Score 2 Difference Critical Value .05 Significant Difference Y / N Base Rate Overall Sample
VCI - PRI 107 123 -16 9.29 Y 11.9 VCI - WMI 107 92 15 10.18 Y 12.2 VCI - PSI 107 84 23 10.99 Y 8 PRI - WMI 123 92 31 10.99 Y 1.3 PRI - PSI 123 84 39 11.75 Y 0.6 WMI - PSI 92 84 8 12.46 N 30.1 FSIQ - GAI 104 117 -13 3.5 Y 0.4 Base rate by overall sample. Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
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Verbal Comprehension Subtests Summary
Subtest Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Reference Group Scaled Score
SEM
Similarities 24 10 50 10 1.16 Vocabulary 39 12 75 11 0.73 Information 16 12 75 12 0.9
Perceptual Reasoning Subtests Summary
Subtest Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Reference Group Scaled Score
SEM
Block Design 63 16 98 16 1.2 Matrix Reasoning 21 11 63 12 1.04 Visual Puzzles 23 15 95 15 0.95 (Figure Weights) 21 13 84 13 1.04
Working Memory Subtests Summary
Subtest Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Reference Group Scaled Score
SEM
Digit Span 24 8 25 8 0.9 Arithmetic 13 9 37 9 1.2
Processing Speed Subtests Summary
Subtest Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Reference Group Scaled Score
SEM
Symbol Search 26 7 16 7 1.31 Coding 53 7 16 7 1.16
Subtest Level Discrepancy Comparisons
Subtest Comparison Score 1 Score 2 Difference Critical Value .05 Significant Difference Y / N Base Rate
Digit Span - Arithmetic 8 9 -1 2.57 N 42.2 Symbol Search - Coding 7 7 0 3.41 N Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.

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Subtest Scaled Score Profile
The vertical bars represent the standard error of measurement (SEM)
Determining Strengths and Weaknesses
Differences Between Subtest and Overall Mean of Subtest Scores
Subtest Subtest Scaled Score Mean Scaled Score Difference Critical Value .05 Strength or Weakness Base Rate
Block Design 16 10.70 5.3 2.85 S 1-2% Similarities 10 10.70 -0.7 2.82 >25% Digit Span 8 10.70 -2.7 2.22 W 15-25% Matrix Reasoning 11 10.70 0.3 2.54 >25% Vocabulary 12 10.70 1.3 2.03 >25% Arithmetic 9 10.70 -1.7 2.73 >25% Symbol Search 7 10.70 -3.7 3.42 W 10-15% Visual Puzzles 15 10.70 4.3 2.71 S 5% Information 12 10.70 1.3 2.19 >25% Coding 7 10.70 -3.7 2.97 W 10% Overall: Mean = 10.7, Scatter = 9, Base rate = 16.7. Base Rate for Intersubtest Scatter is reported for 10 Full Scale Subtests. Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 15 of 22

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Perceptual Reasoning Process Score Summary
Process Score Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank
SEM
Block Design No Time Bonus 48 14 91 1.31
Working Memory Process Score Summary
Process Score Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Base Rate
SEM
Digit Span Forward 10 9 37 -- 1.34 Digit Span Backward 8 9 37 -- 1.34 Digit Span Sequencing 6 6 9 -- 1.27 Longest Digit Span Forward 5 -- -- 97.5 -- Longest Digit Span Backward 4 -- -- 92 -- Longest Digit Span Sequence 3 -- -- 98.5 --
Process Level Discrepancy Comparisons
Process Comparison Score 1 Score 2 Difference Critical Value .05 Significant Difference Y / N Base Rate
Block Design - Block Design No Time Bonus 16 14 2 3.08 N 3.1 Digit Span Forward - Digit Span Backward 9 9 0 3.65 N Digit Span Forward - Digit Span Sequencing 9 6 3 3.6 N 21.1 Digit Span Backward - Digit Span Sequencing 9 6 3 3.56 N 20.5 Longest DS Forward - Longest DS Backward 5 4 1 -- -- 83.5 Longest DS Forward - Longest DS Sequence 5 3 2 -- -- 34.5 Longest DS Backward - Longest DS Sequence 4 3 1 -- -- 15 Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 16 of 22

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Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 17 of 22
WMS–IV Results
Brief Cognitive Status Exam Classification
Age Years of Education Raw Score Classification Level Base Rate
21 years 2 months 11 53 Average 100.0
Index Score Summary
Index Sum of Scaled Scores Index Score Percentile Rank 95% Confidence Interval Qualitative Description
Auditory Memory 50 AMI 115 84 108-120 High Average Visual Memory 37 VMI 95 37 90-101 Average Visual Working Memory 18 VWMI 94 34 87-102 Average Immediate Memory 41 IMI 102 55 96-108 Average Delayed Memory 46 DMI 110 75 103-116 High Average

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Index Score Profile
The vertical bars represent the standard error of measurement (SEM).
Index Scores and Standard Error of Measurement
Index Score
SEM
AMI 115 3.35 VMI 95 3 VWMI 94 3.67 IMI 102 3.35 DMI 110 3.35
Primary Subtest Scaled Score Summary
Subtest Domain Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank
Logical Memory I AM 39 15 95 Logical Memory II AM 39 16 98 Verbal Paired Associates I AM 40 10 50 Verbal Paired Associates II AM 11 9 37 Designs I VM 53 5 5 Designs II VM 52 7 16 Visual Reproduction I VM 41 11 63 Visual Reproduction II VM 40 14 91 Spatial Addition VWM 10 6 9 Symbol Span VWM 32 12 75
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Primary Subtest Scaled Score Profile Auditory Memory Process Score Summary
Process Score Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Cumulative Percentage (Base Rate)
LM II Recognition 29 - - >75% VPA II Recognition 26 - - ��2% VPA II Word Recall 16 8 25 -
Visual Memory Process Score Summary
Process Score Raw Score Scaled Score Percentile Rank Cumulative Percentage (Base Rate)
DE I Content 26 4 2 - DE I Spatial 9 3 1 - DE II Content 30 7 16 - DE II Spatial 10 7 16 - DE II Recognition 21 - - >75% VR II Copy 40 - - 3-9%
Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 19 of 22

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Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 20 of 22
Auditory Memory Index
Subtest Scaled Score AMI Mean Score Difference from Mean Critical Value Base Rate
Logical Memory I 15 12.50 2.50 2.64 15% Logical Memory II 16 12.50 3.50 2.48 2-5% Verbal Paired Associates I 10 12.50 -2.50 1.90 15% Verbal Paired Associates II 9 12.50 -3.50 2.48 5% Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
Visual Memory Index
Subtest Scaled Score VMI Mean Score Difference from Mean Critical Value Base Rate
Designs I 5 9.25 -4.25 2.38 2% Designs II 7 9.25 -2.25 2.38 15-25% Visual Reproduction I 11 9.25 1.75 1.86 >25% Visual Reproduction II 14 9.25 4.75 1.48 2-5% Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
Immediate Memory Index
Subtest Scaled Score IMI Mean Score Difference from Mean Critical Value Base Rate
Logical Memory I 15 10.25 4.75 2.59 2-5% Verbal Paired Associates I 10 10.25 -0.25 1.82 >25% Designs I 5 10.25 -5.25 2.42 1-2% Visual Reproduction I 11 10.25 0.75 1.91 >25% Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
Delayed Memory Index
Subtest Scaled Score DMI Mean Score Difference from Mean Critical Value Base Rate
Logical Memory II 16 11.50 4.50 2.44 5% Verbal Paired Associates II 9 11.50 -2.50 2.44 15-25% Designs II 7 11.50 -4.50 2.44 5% Visual Reproduction II 14 11.50 2.50 1.57 15-25% Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.
Subtest Discrepancy Comparison
Comparison Score 1 Score 2 Difference Critical Value Base Rate
Spatial Addition – Symbol Span 6 12 -6 2.74 8.4 Statistical significance (critical value) at the .05 level.

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Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 21 of 22
Logical Memory
Score Score 1 Score 2 Contrast Scaled Score
LM II Recognition vs. Delayed Recall >75% 16 16 LM Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall 15 16 13
Verbal Paired Associates
Score Score 1 Score 2 Contrast Scaled Score
VPA II Recognition vs. Delayed Recall ��2% 9 16 VPA Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall 10 9 8
Designs
Score Score 1 Score 2 Contrast Scaled Score
DE I Spatial vs. Content 3 4 6 DE II Spatial vs. Content 7 7 8 DE II Recognition vs. Delayed Recall >75% 7 5 DE Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall 5 7 11
Visual Reproduction
Score Score 1 Score 2 Contrast Scaled Score
VR Copy vs. Immediate Recall 3-9% 11 15 VR Immediate Recall vs. Delayed Recall 11 14 14
Index-Level Contrast Scaled Scores
WMS–IV Indexes
Score Score 1 Score 2 Contrast Scaled Score
Auditory Memory Index vs. Visual Memory Index 115 95 8 Visual Working Memory Index vs. Visual Memory Index 94 95 10 Immediate Memory Index vs. Delayed Memory Index 102 110 13

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Copyright © 2009 by NCS Pearson, Inc. Normative data copyright © 2008 by NCS Pearson, Inc. All rights reserved. Sample Examinee Page 22 of 22
Ability-Memory Analysis
Ability Score Type: GAI Ability Score: 117
Predicted Difference Method
Index Predicted WMS–IV Index Score Actual WMS– IV Index Score Difference Critical Value Significant Difference Y / N Base Rate
Auditory Memory
109 115 -6 9.35 N
Visual Memory
110 95 15 8.95 Y 10-15%
Visual Working Memory
111 94 17 10.61 Y 5-10%
Immediate Memory
111 102 9 9.78 N
Delayed Memory
110 110 0 9.57 N Statistical significance (critical value) at the .01 level.
Contrast Scaled Scores
Score Score 1 Score 2 Contrast Scaled Score
General Ability Index vs. Auditory Memory Index 117 115 12 General Ability Index vs. Visual Memory Index 117 95 6 General Ability Index vs. Visual Working Memory Index 117 94 6 General Ability Index vs. Immediate Memory Index 117 102 8 General Ability Index vs. Delayed Memory Index 117 110 10 Verbal Comprehension Index vs. Auditory Memory Index 107 115 13 Perceptual Reasoning Index vs. Visual Memory Index 123 95 5 Perceptual Reasoning Index vs. Visual Working Memory Index 123 94 5 Working Memory Index vs. Auditory Memory Index 92 115 14 Working Memory Index vs. Visual Working Memory Index 92 94 10
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